north las vegas mayor john lee
© Steve Marcus/Las Vegas Sun
North Las Vegas Democrat Mayor John Lee
Republicans are "the clear favorites" to retake control of the House and perhaps even the Senate in November's midterm elections.

North Las Vegas Democrat Mayor John Lee recently announced that he's running for re-election as a Republican. Lee said he became a Republican because the Democrats have embraced socialism and an "anti-American" agenda.

"The party moved past me. In fact, Democrats are now leaving that party in droves because of the socialist agenda that has taken place in the Democratic Party," Lee began. "They're totally anti-American. There was nowhere for people who thought and felt like I did about the virtues and values and morals of being a good American. It was time to leave. They have destroyed the Democratic Party now."

Lee argued the Democrats' "elitist" and "socialist" agenda is not one he "can stand with anymore."

"They had an election recently for leadership, and four of the five people were card-carrying members of the Socialist Party. It's not the party that I grew up with 25 years ago in this environment, and it's not the party I can stand with anymore," he said.

"The working class, or working men and women of this country, and also the small business owners are not a part of the conversation anymore. It all has to do with the elitists and it has to do with the socialists. That is not the agenda that I have in mind for this country of the future," he continued.

"When you're a pro-life Democrat, a pro-gun Democrat, and you're a very conservative person, that's not really well known in the Democratic Party anymore. And so for me to hang on as long as I did, hoping the party would change, it didn't, it got worse," he added.

In fact, Democrats continue to move so far to the Left that a new report reveals that many are switching parties and joining the GOP.

Over the past year, a new report found that more than 1.7 million voters have left the Democratic Party to join the GOP.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi is also facing serious political headwinds heading into November's midterm elections. A whopping 32 Democrats have announced they will not seek re-election. The Senate will also be in place in the fall.

The switch in party affiliations came over the course of the past 12 months, as policies enacted by President Joe Biden and spending bills passed by the Democrat-controlled Congress have been roundly blamed for rampant inflation that has seen record-high average gas and diesel fuel prices, rising food and rent costs, and an enduring supply chain crisis as well as a chaotic, porous southwestern border.

Interestingly, Republicans are gaining a lot of ground in the suburbs of both large and medium-sized cities, "where voters who supported President Biden in 2020 are struggling with inflation and growing increasingly critical of Democratic social issues," Fox News reported, citing data compiled by The Associated Press.

The outlet adds:
While not the final nail in the coffin for Democrats, the voter trend is yet another indicator that Republicans stand to make large gains in Congress and state governments across the country in November.

Biden's administration has scrambled to address skyrocketing gas prices, as well as inflation that sits at a 40-year high and shows no signs of slowing down.

Members of Biden's own party have criticized the White House response to the economic crises, saying he is being too passive.
"I support the president's efforts, but we need a bolder vision and faster action," Rep. Ro Khanna, D-Calif., wrote in an op-ed for The New York Times earlier in June.

"To meet the moment, Mr. Biden should convene an emergency task force empowered to lower prices and address shortages. We need an all-out mobilization, not just a few ad hoc initiatives reacting to headlines," he added.

There are other signs that Democrats are looking at a blowout come November.

Fifty-five members of Congress are not running for re-election this year, which breaks down to 6 U.S. Senators and 49 House lawmakers.

Of those 49 House lawmakers who will not run for re-election,32 of them are Democrats.