Water covered the streets in Swanage, Dorset amid Storm Alex

Water covered the streets in Swanage, Dorset amid Storm Alex this month
The UK had its wettest day on record earlier this month - with enough rain falling to fill Loch Ness, according to the Met Office.

Data shows Saturday 3 October - the day after Storm Alex - brought the highest volume of rainfall since 1891.

An average of 31.7mm (1.25in) fell across the whole of the UK, beating the previous record of 29.8mm (1.17in) seen in August 1986.

To illustrate the significance of this milestone, the head of the Met Office's National Climate Information Centre said the downpours were enough to fill Britain's largest lake, which has a capacity of 7.4 cubic kilometres.

Mark McCarthy added: "In climate statistics, 2019 will be remembered for possessing the UK's hottest day, whereas 2020 will be associated with rainfall records.

"It is exceptional to have 30mm to 50mm or more of rain falling so extensively across the UK - from the south coast of England to the north coast of Scotland - in a single day."

Storm Alex killed two people in France and left at least nine others missing, and caused devastation over the border in Italy.

Scientists warn that global warming is causing more extreme weather and heavy downpours.


The UK has already seen 68% of its average rainfall for the month of October - with some counties in England, including Buckinghamshire and Berkshire, already well over 130%.

Parts of northern Scotland, the North of England, the Midlands and the Isle of Wight have already had more rain than they usually would for the whole month.

But while England has been wetter than usual, Scotland, Northern Ireland and Wales have seen normal amounts of rain, figures show.

The Scottish highlands of Argyll and Bute have been significantly drier than elsewhere - with only 29% of October's total average rain falling so far.