pink fluid

A scientist holds cultures containing a pink fluid to grow new Human-Engineered Meat for Human Consumption.
Starting with a very particular cell extracted from dead cows necks at a local slaughterhouse, a select team of scientists are now close to serving up the world's first human-engineered, cultured meat burger. That's right. A whopping 5 ounce burger will be freshly made from lab grown bits of cultured meat and muscle tissue. The burger, the first of its kind, will be served to curious diner's somewhere in London in the coming weeks.

The whole concept of the program takes us right into a science fiction nightmare made for TV, as billions of fetal cells are needed to make this burger.

In fact, scientists now claim they have proven through studies that if the human population of earth consumes "cultured meat", the world will then save a considerable amount of water and resources, essentially reducing environmental impact from humans. The study titled, Environmental Impacts of Cultured Meat Production, basically outlines how humans are bad, and that we will need to eat all synthetic meat soon as we have become an overpopulated species.

This will likely be one of the next major focus points for globalists such as the Bilderberger's and others who seek to more easily manage the populace of indentured servants.

However, yet even more amazing is the outstanding accuracy and portrayal of future events deriving from Hollywood as we now live in the middle of real-time predictive programming production. In fact, the 1973 film Soylent Green, directed by Richard Fleischer, starring Charlton Heston, takes place in 2022, as the timeline approaches in reality.

An excerpt from the Wikipedia page "Soylent Green" reads, "In 2022, with 40 million people in New York City alone, housing is dilapidated and overcrowded; homeless people fill the streets and food is scarce, and most of the population survives on rations produced by the Soylent Corporation, whose newest product is Soylent Green, a green wafer advertised to contain "high-energy plankton", more nutritious and palatable than its predecessors "Red" and "Yellow", but in short supply.

New York City Police Department detective Robert Thorn lives with his aged friend Solomon "Sol" Roth, a former scholar who helps Thorn's investigations. While investigating the murder of William R. Simonson, a director of the Soylent Corporation, Thorn questions Shirl, a concubine (referred to as "furniture"), and Tab Fielding, Simonson's bodyguard, who, when the murder took place, was escorting Shirl to a store selling meat "under the counter" for Simonson. Thorn later gives Roth the Soylent Oceanographic Survey Report, 2015 to 2019 found in Simonson's apartment. At the police station, Thorn tells his lieutenant (Hatcher) that he suspects an assassination: nothing was stolen from the apartment, its sophisticated alarm and security cameras failed to detect the intruder, and Simonson's bodyguard was conveniently absent. Continuing his investigation, Thorn visits Fielding's apartment and questions Fielding's concubine, Martha, helping himself to a teaspoon of strawberry jam, later identified by Roth as too great a luxury for the concubine of a bodyguard. Under questioning, Shirl reveals that Simonson became troubled in the days before his death. Thorn questions a Catholic priest Simonson had visited, but the priest at first fails to remember Simonson and is later unable to describe the confession. Fielding later murders the priest to silence him."

A recent article by Henry fountain describes the painstaking research and the amount of funding that has been placed into the project. While the financial backer wishes to remain secret, the 5 ounce burger comes at a cost of about $325,000.

Henry Fountain wrote, "But the meat is produced with materials - including fetal calf serum, used as a medium in which to grow the cells - that eventually would have to be replaced by similar materials of non-animal origin. The burger was created at phenomenal cost - 250,000 euros, or about $325,000, provided by a donor who so far has remained anonymous. Large-scale manufacturing of cultured meat that could sit side by side with conventional meat in a supermarket and compete with it in price is at the very least a long way off.

"This is still an early-stage technology," said Neil Stephens, a social scientist at Cardiff University in Wales who has long studied the development of what is also sometimes referred to as "shmeat." "There's still a huge number of things they need to learn."

There are also questions of safety - though Dr. Post and others say cultured meat should be as safe as, or safer than, conventional meat, and might even be made to be healthier - and of the consumer appeal of a product that may bear little resemblance to a thick, juicy steak.

"This is something very new," Dr. Stephens said. "People need to wrestle with the idea of whether this is meat or not."

Dr. Post is well aware of the obstacles. "I see the major hurdles, probably better than anybody else," he said. "But you've got to have faith in technological advances that they will be solved."

As with any technology, costs should eventually come down. "If it can be done more efficiently, there's no reason why it can't be cheaper," he said. "It has to be done using the right materials, introducing recycling into the system, controlling labor through automation."

Cultured meat would have some inherent cost advantages over conventional meat, said Hanna Tuomisto, whose research while at the University of Oxford in England was the basis for the Environmental Science and Technology study. "It's really about the conversion of feed to meat," she said. "In cultured meat production it's much more efficient; only the meat is produced, and not all the other parts."

As of now the meat that will be served up in this first 5 ounce burger is made of fetal calf and animal tissue.

Sources:

^http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soylent_Green

^http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/es200130u

^http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/14/science/engineering-the-325000-in-vitro-burger.html?hp&_r=3&pagewanted=all&