Graham Hancock ancient apocalypse netflix
© Screenshot/Youtube/Netflix
Author Graham Hancock
The Society for American Archaeology officially called the fun police on Netflix's documentary series Ancient Apocalypse in an open letter published Nov. 30.

The SAA's letter accuses the show's host and creator, Graham Hancock, in part, of promoting racist theories. Said "theories" referenced by Hancock (who is in a mixed race marriage, has mixed race children and grandchildren) are not theories at all. Hancock, as a journalist, simply presented the indigenous myths, legends, and religious stories written in history books as data supporting his hypothesis that human society was more evolved than we realized somewhere prior to the Younger Dryas period (11,700 - 12,900 years ago).

He also never mentions race.

The rest of the SAA letter is one big temper tantrum because Hancock is making its entire industry look foolish by failing to explore any of the physical and literary evidence for his hypothesis of a precursory civilization. After trying to speak to the SAA to get their side of the data to back-up the claims made in their letter, I tend to think they are an inherently foolish bunch headed toward the wrong side of history (IRONY! LOL).

Herein lies the issue with the SAA, and every other elitist, closed-minded cabal in the scientific world: once one or a few folks reach a position of power, the entire field is held to their biased standard, expectations, and assumptions. For example, in medicine, one man was elevated to a position of power that led to him shutting down the entire country during our last major pandemic, starting the collapse of the American idea. That's what unchecked power does — it devolves us.

The leaders in archaeology are so scared of Hancock, a journalist, calling bullsh*t on their total inaction on exploring human prehistory that they're willing to call him a racist, make him out to be a bully, and ignore their responsibilities to explore our pre-history.

Surely it's more racist to hear the origin stories told by such indigenous people and dismiss them entirely as myth and legend? In failing to explore the scientific underpinning of these stories, isn't the field of archaeology racist?

Also, imagine being a professional and having a tantrum instead of doing your job ... that's the easiest way to lose funding if ever I heard it. Right?

Hancock is a real-life Indiana Jones, and archeologists are jealous, in my opinion. After interviewing Hancock and several others in the fields of geology, geography, and archaeology, all I see are parallels between the SAA's behavior and petty little high school girls, too insecure to put their hands up and say, "we failed because we didn't do the work, and now Hancock has our glory. What can we do to help him and make this a team effort?"

I mean, if all of what we've hypothesized and theorized is true, the fate of humanity is in the balance here, guys. Isn't it time we shut up and do the work together? Failure to investigate our past will surely lead to our collapse, and it's pretty horrendous to see the one institution responsible for this data collection not only turn a blind eye, but to attack the one man doing the investigations they should have been doing this entire time.

A phone call and comprehensive email was sent to the SAA by the Daily Caller, requesting all data and information pertaining to the claims made in the letter to Netflix, as well as asking a member of the organization to take part in an interview. I wanted to present a balanced discussion for both parties. A single-line response said that they had no further comment.