GFS 2m Temp Anomalies (C) for Dec 2.
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GFS 2m Temp Anomalies (C) for Dec 2.
While the mainstream media reports "Australians are set to sizzle through the most dangerous heatwave of the year so far," what they also fail to mention is that 1) such bursts of heat are typical for this time of year, 2) the conditions will last fewer than three days, and 3) they will be closely followed by record-cold Antarctic air and even rare December snow.

The MSM is using images of last year's wildfires in the hope that their readers are too trusting and/or stupid (or perhaps too busy) to do their own research.

Chief warm-mongers, The Guardian are warning that Friday's temperatures will lead to heat-related illness such as dizziness, tiredness, irritability, shallow breathing, vomiting and confusion.

However, one quick check of the weather charts reveals the only vomit-inducing and confusing things here are the MSM's bias reporting, not the mercury: 1) 30C to 40C is hardly unprecedented at this time of year, and 2) the heat is also very fleeting, running from the evening of Nov 26 and concluding, for most, on Nov 28.

Moreover, the balmy temps will be replaced by record polar cold as the calendar flips to December (a setup serving as yet another example of the prevalence of swing between extremes during times of low solar activity).

Both the GFS and ECMWF are currently in alignment here, with each weather model foreseeing Antarctic air sweeping in from the west on Tuesday and engulfing central and southern regions by Wednesday:
GFS 2m Temp Anomalies (C) for Dec 2.

GFS 2m Temp Anomalies (C) for Dec 2.
The picture turns a little uncertain after that, but by then the higher elevations of Tasmania are forecast to have received a rare dumping of summer snow, perhaps as much as 2.2 inches (5.9 cm):
ECMWF “new snow” forecast for Dec 1 [windy.com].
© windy.com
ECMWF “new snow” forecast for Dec 1
GFS “total snowfall” for Dec 1 [tropicaltidbits.com].
© tropicaltidbits.com
GFS “total snowfall” for Dec 1
Eyeing east and across the Tasman sea, New Zealand's South Island is on for some truly astonishing December totals by the end of next week.

The cold air mass that engulfed southern Australia at the start of the week is set to deliver bone-chilling lows and up to 31.8 inches (80.8 cm) of summer snow down the western mountain ranges:
ECMWF “new snow” forecast from Nov 27 to Dec 6 [windy.com].
© windy.com
ECMWF “new snow” forecast from Nov 27 to Dec 6
These dumpings could threaten all-time December snowfall records.
Stay tuned for updates.

Winter 2020 was a relatively mild one across New Zealand, but with the arrival of spring came a violent switch in fortunes.

September 1 saw widespread snowfall across the South Island with accumulations building at abnormally low-levels: inland parts of Canterbury and Otago, for example, saw5+cm (2+inches)

The cold and snowy conditions lingered through September, and conspired to deliver 1.3 feet of spring snow to the nation's ski-fields mid-month

The COLD TIMES are returning, the mid-latitudes are REFREEZING in line with historically low solar activity, cloud-nucleating Cosmic Rays, and a meridional jet stream flow.

Both NOAA and NASA appear to agree, if you read between the lines, with NOAA saying we're entering a 'full-blown' Grand Solar Minimum in the late-2020s, and NASA seeing this upcoming solar cycle (25) as "the weakest of the past 200 years", with the agency correlating previous solar shutdowns to prolonged periods of global cooling here.

Furthermore, we can't ignore the slew of new scientific papers stating the immense impact The Beaufort Gyre could have on the Gulf Stream, and therefore the climate overall.

NASA prediction Solar Cycle 25
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NASA prediction Solar Cycle 25
400 Years of Sunspot Observations
© electroverse.net
400 Years of Sunspot Observations
Prepare accordinglylearn the facts, relocate if need be, and grow your own.