stay home sign
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The number of men dying from cancer in private homes during the coronavirus pandemic is roughly 50 per cent higher than the five-year average, new figures show.

The Office for National Statistics (ONS) has released startling figures which appear to show the impact the Covid-19 crisis is having on other health services across England.

Deaths from dementia and Alzheimer's disease in private homes in England have risen 79 per cent during the pandemic compared with the five-year average.

The figures show that the leading cause of death in private homes during Covid-19 was ischaemic heart disease.

The ONS confirmed that excess deaths in private homes - the number of deaths above the average for the corresponding period in the previous five years - have mostly been deaths not involving Covid-19.

Excess deaths
© ONS
Excess deaths in private homes, care homes and hospitals
Of the 25,472 excess deaths in private homes in England that were registered up to September 11, 2,358 (nine per cent) were deaths involving Covid-19 while 23,114 (91 per cent) were non-Covid excess deaths.

In Wales, of the 1,624 excess deaths in private homes over the same period, 134 (eight per cent) were deaths involving Covid-19 while 1,490 (92 per cent) were non-Covid excess deaths.

Deaths in private homes in England for males from heart disease since the start of the coronavirus pandemic are 26 per cent higher than the five-year average.

Prostate cancer deaths have increased 53 per cent while deaths from bowel cancer are up 46 per cent.

For women in England, deaths in private homes from dementia and Alzheimer's disease have increased 75 per cent while deaths from breast cancer are up 47 per cent.

In Wales, deaths in private homes for males from heart disease are up 23 per cent on the five-year average, prostate cancer deaths have increased 75 per cent and bowel cancer deaths are up 52 per cent.

The number of female deaths in private homes from dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Wales is almost double the five-year average (up 92 per cent) while deaths from breast cancer are up 28 per cent.

All figures cover deaths that were registered between March 14 and September 11.

Sarah Caul, the ONS' head of mortality analysis, said: "While deaths in hospitals and care homes have dropped below the five-year average since the initial peak of the coronavirus pandemic, we've consistently seen deaths in private homes remain well above the five-year average.

"We have seen an overall increase of deaths as well as a redistribution of various causes of death.

"For instance, while deaths of heart disease are below average in hospital, it has been above average at home.

"It's a similar picture when looking at prostate cancer for males and dementia and Alzheimer's disease for females.

"Unlike the high numbers of deaths involving Covid-19 in hospitals and care homes, the majority of deaths in private homes are unrelated to Covid-19."