A resident digs out their car after a snowstorm dumped over a foot of snow
© Bob Karp
A resident digs out their car after a snowstorm dumped over a foot of snow around the area Wednesday, March 7, 2018, in Morristown, N.J. The storm carrying wind, rain and heavy snow was expected to continue into Wednesday night.
For the second time in less than a week, a nor'easter is tearing up the East Coast. The last one blasted New England with gusts up to 97 mph and knocked out power to 2 million homes and businesses. This one will dump more than a foot of snow from Philadelphia to Boston.

By the time this storm is over late Thursday morning, New York City will be under 8 to 12 inches — but the heaviest snow will fall in New Jersey and parts of Upstate New York. As much as 24 inches is possible in those areas.

* Snowfall rates topped 2 inches per hour this afternoon in New Jersey

* Power outages are possible as branches break under the weight of the snow

* Combined wind and snow will lead to whiteout conditions at the height of the storm



We're updating this story through the day...

11:04 a.m. — It's still snowing!

Snow ended for the Tri-State area late Wednesday night, but it's still snowing from Eastern Massachusetts north through New England. Snowfall rates peaked at a whopping 6 inches per hour last night in Vermont. Maine is getting the heaviest snow on Thursday morning, although a few significant bands are trickling down into Massachusetts. Only a couple more inches will fall there, but parts of Maine will get over a foot on top of what has already been measured.

A quick look at snowfall totals seems to suggest the forecast was pretty good. The only place it didn't do well was New York City, where temperatures were just too warm for the storm to overcome. It started snowing there late Wednesday morning, but didn't really begin to accumulate until early evening when the sun went down. Temperatures near the ground (and the ground temperatures themselves) were too warm for accumulation.

This is fairly typical, though — the urban heat island effect almost always reduces the amount of snow a big metropolitan area like D.C., Philadelphia and New York will get. The hard part is knowing how much of that warmth to take into account in the snow forecast. For better or worse, meteorologists tend to play it safe and forecast snow on the high end so people are prepared.

snow map
John Visco is pictured clearing off his driveway in Derry, New Hampshire, after Wedneday night's storm covered the town in a blanket of snow

John Visco is pictured clearing off his driveway in Derry, New Hampshire, after Wedneday night's storm covered the town in a blanket of snow
Select snow totals through Thursday morning, in inches:

New York

MONROE — 26.0
SLOATSBURG — 26.0
HIGHLAND MILLS — 24.3
CENTRAL PARK — 3.2
NYC/JFK AIRPORT — 2.8
NYC/LA GUARDIA AIRPORT — 1.7

New Jersey

KINNELON — 31.0
FRANKLIN LAKES — 24.0
NORTH CALDWELL — 23.0
NEWARK AIRPORT — 4.6
ATLANTIC CITY INTL ARPT — 2.5

Pennsylvania

RICHBORO — 16.0
ROSEMONT — 14.3
NEWTOWN GRANT — 13.2
PHILADELHIA INTL AIRPORT — 6.1

Connecticut

WARREN — 28.0
NEW FAIRFIELD — 26.8
NEWTOWN — 24.3
NEW HARTFORD CENTER — 12.3

Rhode Island

BURRILLVILLE — 13.0
NORTH FOSTER — 11.3

Vermont

WOODFORD — 36.0
LONDONDERRY — 30.0
PERU — 28.0
WILMINGTON — 27.0

New Hampshire

SUNAPEE — 18.0
DOVER — 16.0

Massachusetts

BECKET — 23.3
WESTBOROUGH — 16.9
WORCESTER — 16.2
BOSTON LOGAN — 5.9

Delaware

GREENVILLE — 10.4
BEL AIR — 3.0
ANNAPOLIS — 2.0
BOWIE — 2.0
BALTIMORE-WASHINGTON INTL — 1.8

10:15 p.m. — In Vermont, 18 inches of snow in three hours

That's impressive by any standard — even Vermont's. The Berkshires are getting slammed multiple feet of snow tonight, and it's not the heavy wet kind that fell along the I-95 corridor. The air is much colder there, which means all of the precipitation will fall as light, fluffy snow. That also means snow depth will be much deeper because it's less compact.

Because of the wet and heavy nature of the snow

Because of the wet and heavy nature of the snow, multiple trees were taken down across the northeast, knocking out power to over 1,000 homes and businesses. Pictured is Brian Farrell of Walpole, Massachusetts entering his home Thursday after a tree fell on it and his car
A police vehicle is pictured blocking off a road near dozens of downed power lines in Matic, Massachusetts, after the second storm in a week knocked out power for dozens in the town

A police vehicle is pictured blocking off a road near dozens of downed power lines in Matic, Massachusetts, after the second storm in a week knocked out power for dozens in the town


This was the scene earlier in the evening as reported by NBC Boston. Several inches of snow has accumulated on the roads in Massachusetts and they are treacherous. This looked like it was going to be a slow-motion tragedy up until the last second.


And in Hamden, Conn., we see what it looks like when a transformer blows right in front of your house. This usually happens when power is cut off in one area, causing too much electricity to flow through other transformers. When this happens close to home, power will usually be out for a while until the entire transformer can be replaced.


(Read more here)