Two wolf cubs are picked up on hidden cameras in the nature reserve of Castel di Guido near Rome, which is run by run by LIPU, the Italian League for the Protection of Birds

Two wolf cubs are picked up on hidden cameras in the nature reserve of Castel di Guido near Rome, which is run by run by LIPU, the Italian League for the Protection of Birds
Wolves have been spotted on the outskirts of Rome for the first time in more than a hundred years.

The predators were seen roaming through the Castel di Guido, near Leonardo da Vinci airport, walking close to a three-lane motorway.

Scientists have welcomed the symbolic return, given that the city's symbol is two children - Romulus and Remus - suckling on a wolf.

Alessia De Lorenzis, a professor of natural sciences who is monitoring the wolf pack, told The Telegraph: 'This is the first time in more than 100 years that wolves have been found living near Rome.


The predators, one of which is seen here, were picked up by hidden cameras roaming through the Castel di Guido near Leonardo da Vinci airport walking close to a three-lane motorway

The predators, one of which is seen here, were picked up by hidden cameras roaming through the Castel di Guido near Leonardo da Vinci airport walking close to a three-lane motorway
Scientists have welcomed the symbolic return of the wolf, seen here in a deep puddle, given that the city's symbol is two children - Romulus and Remus - suckling on a wolf

Scientists have welcomed the symbolic return of the wolf, seen here in a deep puddle, given that the city's symbol is two children - Romulus and Remus - suckling on a wolf
'We're very pleased that they are back.'

One of the male wolves has been nicknamed Romulus in a nod to the city's symbol.

Killing wolves was encouraged in 1970 in Italy which reduced the population to just 100.

A year later the species was given protected status and the population is now estimated as between 1,500 and 2,000.

The nature reserve where the four wolves were spotted is run by the Italian League for the Protection of Birds (LIPU), whose president Fulvio Mamone Capria said: 'It's an extraordinary event. We are honored to be able to accommodate in our oasis.'

It is thought the wolves are surviving exclusively on a diet of wild boar having made their way from the Alps and there are claims the animals are also living in the countryside near Paris.

One of the male wolves, possibly one of these two predators seen in the dark, has been nicknamed Romulus in a nod to the city's symbol

One of the male wolves, possibly one of these two predators seen in the dark, has been nicknamed Romulus in a nod to the city's symbol