On Saturday, Sept. 10, a park ranger took this photo of waterfalls in normally-dry Death Valley National Park. Badwater Road, south of Natural Bridge.
© National Park Service
On Saturday, Sept. 10, a park ranger took this photo of waterfalls in normally-dry Death Valley National Park. Badwater Road, south of Natural Bridge.
It's been a summer of extreme extremes in California's Death Valley.

From flash flooding in August that left a vehicle swallowed in the mud to an extremely high, possibly record-breaking, September temperature of 127 degrees at Furnace Creek.

Now, the aftermath of Hurricane Kay has led to more heavy rainfall and an unlikely sight — waterfalls in one of the driest, hottest places in the world.

"Storms fueled by the remnants of Hurricane Kay caused localized, heavy damage in Death Valley National Park on Saturday afternoon," park authorities wrote on Facebook on Sunday, alongside a stunning video showing muddy waterfalls cascading down the mountainside by Badwater Basin.



(SFGATE reported on that very spot recently, including a walk across its dried, hexagonal salt patterns without a drop of water in sight.)

The National Park Service said in a statement that Highway 190, the main road in and out of the valley, has a section of pavement missing across both lanes near Towne Pass. It reported that rangers asked visitors to leave after receiving a warning to the storm one hour prior to its arrival from the National Weather Service. Numerous vehicles were reported temporarily blocked by the active flooding before the NPS road crew came to their aid.

Badwater Basin, seen from Dante's View, Death Valley, California.
© Mark Newman/Getty Images
Badwater Basin, seen from Dante's View, Death Valley, California.
State Route 190 is closed between Keeler and Stovepipe Wells, and Badwater Road is fully closed. The NPS added that some other park roads are still closed from the flash flooding in August, a storm that the park service referred to as a "1,000 year rain event."
Death Valley receives approximately 2.2 inches of rain a year. The August flood measured 1.46 inches in just a few hours.