parachute meteor stunt los angeles red bull
© Michael Clark/Red Bull Content Pool
Mike Swanson in wingsuit flies through downtown Los Angeles on March 20, 2019.
A streak of light in the skies over downtown Los Angeles Wednesday night that sparked the attention of onlookers wasn't the opening to the next Hollywood disaster flick, but instead a stunt to celebrate the final supermoon of the year.

The spectacle was reported around 7:30 p.m., with many taking to Twitter to share videos and photos of the sight.

"What is this flying item on fire above downtown Los Angeles?" Dennis Hegstad wrote.


Others shared what they saw over the downtown area.

"Saw a meteor burn through the sky of LA today," another Twitter user wrote.

The spectacle even drew the attention of the Los Angeles Police Department, who reassured the public that the streak of the light was not Mars attacking.
red bull skydive meteor losangeles
© Michael Clark/Red Bull Content Pool
Skydivers from the Red Bull Air Force leaped from a helicopter 4,000 feet above Los Angeles and swooped into the downtown at more than 120 mph to celebrate the final supermoon of 2019.
"PSA: A meteor did not crash into Downtown Los Angeles, and no, it's not an alien invasion...just a film shoot," police said. "This is Tinseltown after all."

But it wasn't quite a film shoot, either.

The whole stunt was pulled off by the Red Bull Air Force to celebrate the final supermoon of 2019.

"In order to mark the occasion, some of the most experienced skydivers, BASE jumpers and freeflyers on the planet in the Red Bull Air Force took to the skies above the famous American city for the aerial stunt," the group said.

The team leaped from a helicopter 4,000 feet above Los Angeles and swooped into the downtown area at more than 120 mph wearing wingsuits.


Jon Devore wingsuit flys past the Supermoon in Los Angeles, California, USA on 20 March, 2019. (Andy Farrington/Red Bull Content Pool)

"To add a touch of Hollywood glitz, the suits were fitted with LED lights and sparking pyrotechnics that lit up the night sky as the sun set and the supermoon rose," the company announced.