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House

Communities designed by baby boomers for retirement

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Building your retirement community while you're still young allows you to develop relationships before anyone needs too much help.
A few years ago, Marianne Kilkenny's elderly parents moved into an assisted living community. That got her thinking about her own plans because she didn't want to end up in a similar community or a facility run by a company.

Kilkenny, 65, the founder of Women For Living in Community, is among a growing number of baby boomers who are taking matters into their own hands by creating their own retirement communities.

"I'm part of a movement," says Kilkenny, who lives in Asheville, North Carolina, and is the author of Your Quest for Home: A Guidebook to Find the Ideal Community for Your Later Years. She says the focus of the movement is "aging in community as opposed to aging in place."

Comment: Cohousing of all types seems to be the growing trend on the bbm. Enriching lives and taking care of one another is catching on!


Bulb

Dr. Suzanne Humphries has a lot to say about Aluminum in vaccines

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Suzanne Humphries, a once sought-after nephrologist based out of Maine, has dedicated the last decade of her career to searching for the truth about vaccine safety.

Her most recent book, Dissolving Illusions: Disease, Vaccines and the Forgotten History, is a telling and thorough collection of historical documents and research that paints a different picture of vaccine safety and efficacy than is commonly presented by pro-vaccine advocates.

In a recent lecture, Humphries explains how aluminum, a widely used vaccine adjuvant, poses a greater risk to the health of the public than once previously thought, especially in regards to vaccines being given to pregnant women.

Comment: Additional dangers of Aluminum provided in the following articles:


Health

Monsanto's Roundup linked to cancer of the lymph system

About 30 years of research regarding non-Hodgkin lymphoma (cancer) and its correlation with occupational exposure to 80 agricultural pesticides and 21 chemical groups has linked glyphosate, the main ingredient in Monsanto's Roundup, with cancer of the lymph tissue. In a paper published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 44 papers representing studies in high-income countries found that there was a "striking increase" in the incidence of non-Hodgkin's type lymphomas in the last 30 years.

The paper explains that farmers have high cancer rates, overall, and agrochemical exposure is likely the culprit, even among a group that normally has low across-the board mortality rates. Among the pesticides studied, glyphosate exposure was found to be positively associated with a particular type of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma - called B cell lymphoma. This best-selling toxin distributed primarily by Monsanto is just the tip of the iceberg, as pointed out by Sayer Ji of GreenMedInfo.

Comment: See also Besides cancer, Monsanto's Roundup is being linked to a host of other diseases and illnesses.


Info

Sitting for too long can do harm to your body

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With the continuous progress of technology, we need to put less and less effort to get the things done. And it's not only about jobs which are getting more and more computerized every day; it's about our lifestyle in general.

If in the recent past we had to wash the dishes and clean the floor ourselves, now there are people who have a dishwasher and a robotic vacuum cleaner which can do that for us. I'm not saying it's bad to take advantage of the privileges of technology (I'm a fan of technology myself), but the problem is that, as a result, there are those of us who sometimes tend to avoid physical activity and end up sitting for more hours a day than our parents and grandparents did.

Comment: Additional information about the negative effects of sitting too long: Also check out this excellent article by Mark Sisson: 10 principles of primal living that are (finally) getting mainstream media coverage
Yes, Primal health principles and positions are getting mainstream recognition. Let's take a look at some of the major ones.

That sitting is bad and exercise might not be enough.

Everyone knows that being sedentary is a poor health choice. But most people figured the solution was to set aside regular times each week to exercise. Formal exercise was the answer, and movement was segregated from "normal" life. As long as you hit the gym every other day, you could do nothing for the remainder of your time and be perfectly healthy.

That's just intermittent sedentism, though, and it
doesn't work. Frequent low level movement throughout the day punctuated by intermittent bouts of intense exercise is what I've prescribed for years, and the mainstream is beginning to get the hint. Articles lamenting the prevalence of sitting, its scary effect on our health, and how exercising isn't enough to counter it come out on a regular basis now.

Going barefoot isn't insane.

Going barefoot is perhaps the most intuitive Primal lifestyle change. People can deny the meat-eating, fat-loving, sun-seeking behavior, they can claim that "sleep is for the weak" and "gluten-free is a fad" all they want, but they can't ignore the shoeless feet that humans have been born with for millions of years. The bare feet we wear to bed at night somehow use to walk without teetering over and falling or twisting an ankle on the way to the bathroom are also fairly competent vehicles for daily locomotion.

Ignoring the big push back from podiatrists (likely worried about losing patients and orthotics addicts), the mass media coverage of barefooting has been reasonable. They don't wholeheartedly endorse it, but then again, neither do we without caveats like "do it gradually" and "walk before you run." Harvard even has a guide to safe barefoot running. And the people who matter - the ones who decide to or decide not to go barefoot, as opposed to the experts urging them to reconsider - are embracing it; sales of shoes that emulate the unshod state have stabilized but remain high.



Syringe

Why do pro-vaxxers chicken-out on vaccine debates?

Within the last few weeks, two debates about vaccines and vaccinations were highly anticipated by those who pejoratively are referred to as "anti-vaxxers."

One was to have been a debate on April 8, 2015 between vaccine rights attorney Alan Phillips, JD, and Dr. Annie Sparrow, a pediatrician who obviously pushes vaccines literally and figuratively, with the venue being WMNF Radio's The Fairness Doctrine. Dr. Sparrow flew away and cancelled at the last minute. How disappointing! Consequently, Attorney Phillips issued a three-page paper after the debate actually took place with Radio Host Jennifer Sullivan taking the pro-vaccine argument that Dr. Sparrow obviously was to have 'nailed down' but reneged on. One has to question if Dr. Sparrow got cold feet, or if the facts were too hot to handle.

The other debate was to have taken place between two medical doctors: Paul Offit, MD, vaccine inventor, and Toni Bark, MD, an integrative medical practitioner with credentials an arm's length long, on Wednesday, April 13th, on Chicago 560. The topic to be discussed was "Parental choice and vaccination," a hot, hot topic now that there have been more and more vaccines added to the CDC's schedule for children in order to enroll in daycare centers and schools. Again, there was a last-minute "chicken out" by Dr. Offit.

Syringe

Elmo: Corporate America's latest pro-vaccine whore

Everyone loves Elmo, that cute furry little muppet spokesperson for the pre-school set. But there's a deep, dark secret behind his adorable visage.

I hate to break it to you, but Elmo is a whore.

He's being pimped out.

Harsh, right? Well, prostitution is the act of selling oneself for money. And Elmo is now the cutest little spokesperson around for pro-vaccine propaganda. Watch the following video right from the Sesame Street corner. Keep a barf bag handy.

Sun

Lack of sun exposure causing huge increase in cases of rickets in young children


Rickets is caused by a deficiency in vitamin D and causes bone deformities such as bowed legs, pictured, and a curvature of the spine
Doctors have called for under-fours to be given free vitamins after a rise in the number of cases of rickets due to a lack of exposure to sunlight.

The country's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies is said to be concerned at the number of children suffering from the condition, which is caused by a deficiency in vitamin D.

The disease, a scourge of Victorian Britain, was virtually eradicated after the Second World War but is returning as more and more youngsters are used to staying indoors playing video games than going outside.

Now, it has been reported that Professor Davies has ordered the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) to review the cost of providing vitamin supplements to all children under the age of four, in a bid to reverse the trend.

The move is being supported by one of Britain's leading experts on vitamin D deficiency at University College Hospital London Alastair Sutcliffe, who has spoken about an 'epidemic' of cases due to a lack of sun exposure and overuse of sunscreen.

He told the Sunday Times: 'Nothing is free but the cost of the ill-effects of deficiency, such as rickets and anaemia from families not providing children with these supplements is greater for the NHS.

Comment: Getting adequate sunshine and supplementing with Vitamin D3 when necessary will help prevent a host of diseases that are associated with low levels of the vitamin. Deficiencies can lead to obesity, diabetes, hypertension, depression, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, osteoporosis, and neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, in addition to some types of cancers like breast, prostate, and colon. It is also important to know that if you have a low vitamin D level in spite of taking supplements, a magnesium deficiency can be one of the reasons you can't correct it. Be aware that it is quite difficult to obtain enough magnesium from food sources as our soils have been deficient in magnesium for decades, so supplementation may be necessary.


Shoe

Movements of ADHD children vital to how they remember information and workout complex cognitive tasks


New research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study.
For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to "Sit still and concentrate!"

But new research conducted at UCF shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study published in an early online release of the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

The findings show the longtime prevailing methods for helping children with ADHD may be misguided.

"The typical interventions target reducing hyperactivity. It's exactly the opposite of what we should be doing for a majority of children with ADHD," said one of the study's authors, Mark Rapport, head of the Children's Learning Clinic at the University of Central Florida. "The message isn't 'Let them run around the room,' but you need to be able to facilitate their movement so they can maintain the level of alertness necessary for cognitive activities."

Question

Which comes first: The leaky gut or the dysfunctional immune system?

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I was asked by healthline.com to comment on a new study from researchers at Lund University in Sweden that was published earlier this month in the journal PLoS ONE. The study is entitled Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction Develops at the Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, and Can Be Induced by Adoptive Transfer of Auto-Reactive T Cells. Yep, that's a mouthful, but hang in there. This study is absolutely fascinating and is very relevant to everyone battling autoimmune disease. It's so interesting that I'm devoting an entire blog post to it!

Comment: Learn more about the importance of Gut health listen to The Health and Wellness Show - 13 April 2015 - Connecting the Dots


Pills

Negative thoughts? Try probiotics

New research finds that our gut bacteria linked with negative thinking - and supplementing probiotics can reduce negative thoughts.
Negative thinking is defined as a spiraling of thinking that takes a person from one negative thought to the next. Often this is lightly attributed to getting up on the wrong side of the bed. But now we find it may also be a case of 'bad bugs'.

Could the little microbes teeming in our gut have anything to do with negative thinking? Surely not, you say smugly.

Think again.

Triple-blind study finds probiotics affect negative thoughts

Research from the Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition in The Netherlands has determined that one's gut bacteria indeed will affect our negative thinking and cognitive state.

Comment: For more on probiotics see: Also, listen to the Health and Wellness show's episode on gut health.