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Bizarro Earth

Scientist map Mount Rainer magma, say it will erupt again

mount rainier magma map
Scientists from the University of Utah have determined that Mount Rainier, one of the most prominent peaks in North America, will erupt again. The question of when remains unanswered, but science has recently discovered how: By measuring how quickly Earth conducts electricity and seismic waves, they've effectively "mapped" Rainier's magma "plumbing."

"This is the most direct image yet capturing the melting process that feeds magma into a crustal reservoir that eventually is tapped for eruptions," says geophysicist Phil Wannamaker, of the university's Energy & Geoscience Institute and Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering. "But it does not provide any information on the timing of future eruptions from Mount Rainier or other Cascade Range volcanoes."

Comment: For more information see:

Rainier, third most dangerous U.S. volcano, USGS says
Mapping the deep magma reservoir below Washington's Mt. Rainier

Bizarro Earth

Mapping the deep magma reservoir below Washington's Mt. Rainier

© R. Shane McGary / Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
Map shows, in purple and pink, the west-east line of magnetotelluric sensors that were placed north of Mount Rainier.
Experts have mapped a huge magma reservoir below Mount Rainier in Washington state that begins melting deep in the Earth's mantle before pushing upwards to where it will eventually be tapped for eruption. Researchers from the United States and Norway used seismic imaging and the measurement of variations in electrical and magnetic fields to create a detailed road map of the pathway molten rock takes to the surface.

Their findings, published this week in the journal Nature, are aimed at helping experts understand the volcano's inner workings, and eventually determine when it might again erupt. A state landmark, Mount Rainier last erupted in the 19th century. It is widely expected to erupt again, according to the U.S. National Park Service.

The tallest volcano and fifth-highest peak in the contiguous United States, it towers some 14,410-feet (4,392 meters) about 58 miles (93 km) southeast of Seattle, from most of which it is visible.

Comment: No such thing as a dormant volcano: Magma chambers awake sooner than thought

Alarm Clock

Volcanic earthquakes detected at Philippine's Bulusan volcano

© USGS/Chris Newhall
Although not posing any serious threats at the moment, the Philippine Institute of Volcanology and Seismology (Phivolcs) on Sunday told the public to stay away from Bulusan volcano's permanent danger zone in Sorsogon after volcanic earthquakes were detected.

"During the 24-hour observation period, the seismic network detected thirteen (13) volcanic earthquakes. Ground deformation data from continuous GPS and precise leveling survey also indicated that the volcano is slightly inflated," Phivolcs said in a statement.

The agency said the volcano's status is still at alert level 0.

"The local government units and the public are reminded that entry to the four-kilometer radius Permanent Danger Zone (PDZ) is strictly prohibited due to the possibility of sudden and hazardous steam-driven or phreatic eruptions," Phivolcs said.

It warned against aircraft flying near the volcano's summit since sudden eruption may be harmful.
Attention

Mount Sinabung volcano erupts (again) in Indonesia

© Baltimore Sun/Matt Bracken
Mount Sinabung, one of the most active volcanoes in Indonesia, has erupted, spewing ash to the sky. No casualty was reported, official said here Sunday.

The volcano located in Karo district of North Sumatra province erupted at 23.05 p.m. Saturday, Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, spokesman of national disaster management agency, said.

"The height of the eruption could not be determined as it took place at night and there were many clouds," he told Xinhua by phone.

"Rains of hot ash occurred in several place in Karo district, but it did not trigger further evacuation," Sutopo added.

The 2,600-metre (8,530-foot) Mount Sinabung last erupted June 29, shooting columns of ash by up to 4,000 metres into the sky.

Bizarro Earth

El Salvador's Chaparrastique volcano continues to show significant levels of internal seismic activity

The Chaparrastique volcano near San Miguel, El Salvador continues to show significant levels of internal seismic activity. Authorities are on a high level of preparedness should actions be needed. The activity since yesterday has been at the highest levels seen. The chart below shows activity during July -- the average, normal level is 50, and current levels are above 1100.
This graphic shows the location of micro-quakes on the northern slopes of the volcano:
Bizarro Earth

Costa Rica's 'extinct' Chata volcano being re-examined for activity

Volcanologists of the National Seismological Network (RSN) have begun early research on the Chato volcano, located southeast of Poas volcano, to find out information such as its last eruption. RSN volcanologist, Gino Gonzalez, said that measurements of the temperature of the lagoon taken by sonar instrumentation, determining that the surface of the lake is about 19°C and approximately 6 meters deeper the temperature of the lagoon varies drastically.

"It's a volcano which very little is known about its historical activity, so we have seismic stations for periodic sampling and we are starting a campaign to closely monitor it every six months," Gonzalez said. Chato is considered an extinct volcano according to the authorities who made the first sampling to verify the behavior and activity.

According to volcanologist at greater depths there is an increase in the amount of dissolved oxygen in the lake, which could be due to a strong photosynthetic activity, consistent with high turbidity or gas accumulation at deeper levels. The maximum depth of the lake is around 18 meters, averaging 15 meters.
Phoenix

Hot spot: Yellowstone road melts, sites closed

Yellowstone
© National park Service
Firehole Lake Drive superheated by surrounding thermals
The ever-changing thermal geology of Yellowstone National Park has created a hot spot that melted an asphalt road and closed access to popular geysers and other attractions at the height of tourist season, officials said Thursday.

As they examined possible fixes, park officials warned visitors not to hike into the affected area, where the danger of stepping through solid-looking soil into boiling-hot water was high.

"There are plenty of other great places to see thermal features in the park," Yellowstone spokesman Al Nash said. "I wouldn't risk personal injury to see these during this temporary closure."

Naturally changing thermal features often damage Yellowstone's roads and boardwalks. Steaming potholes in asphalt roads and parking lots - marked off by traffic cones - are fairly common curiosities.

However, the damage to Firehole Lake Drive is unusually severe and could take several days to fix. The 3.3-mile loop six miles north of Old Faithful takes visitors past Great Fountain Geyser, White Dome Geyser and Firehole Lake.

Unusually warm weather for Yellowstone - with high temperatures in the mid-80s - has contributed to turning the road into a hot, sticky mess.

"We've got some ideas. We're going to try them. Our maintenance staff has really looked at the issue," Nash said.
Sherlock

Deep in the Antarctic ice, the history of planet's biggest volcanic explosions

© Independent
Scientists have been able to trace the history of volcanic eruptions over the last 2,000 years by analysing deposits of sulphate dust in a series of ice cores drilled deep into the West Antarctic ice sheet

Some of the biggest volcanic eruptions of the last 2,000 years have left their indelible mark deep within the pristine ice sheet of the Antarctic, a study has found.

Scientists have been able to trace the most complete history of volcanic eruptions since the birth of Christ by analysing deposits of sulphate dust in a series of ice cores drilled deep into the West Antarctic ice sheet.

The time series from 26 separate ice cores drilled out from 19 different sites shows that there were 116 volcanic eruptions in the past two millennia that were big enough to result in plumes of volcanic sulphate dust being transported as far as the South Pole.

Most the eruptions cannot be identified, however the biggest, in 1257, was already hinted at from medieval chronicles and tree rings. Scientists identified the sulphate deposits as coming from the Samalas volcano on Lombok Island of Indonesia.
Bizarro Earth

Kamchatka volcano spews new ash plume 8 km into sky

Shiveluch Volcano
© Vesti.Ru
Shiveluch, one of the largest and most active volcanos of Russia's far-eastern Kamchatka Peninsula, has spewed a plume of ash as high as 8 km into the air, the Kamchatka Emergency Service reported on Sunday.

"The wind is driving the ash cloud southeastwards. There are no populated centers along its path," the report says.

Although no ash fallouts have been registered in the Ust-Kamchatsky district, rescuers have recommended tourist operators to cancel tours in the vicinity of the volcano. The orange-level volcanic alert has been issued for aircraft flying over the peninsula.

It's the second ash plume ejected by Shiveluch since the beginning of July. On July 1, a cloud of ash shot up 7 km above sea-level. The town of Klyuchi with a population of 5,000 is the nearest community to the 2,500-high volcano, 45 km away from it.

After Shiveluch intensified in May 2009, a crack about 30 m deep appeared in its dome.
Cloud Lightning

SOTT Earth Changes Video Summary - June 2014

Signs of the Times in June 2014

© SOTT.net
The sixth installment in our new monthly series, the following video compiles footage of 'signs of the times' from around the world during June 2014 - 'earth changes', extreme weather and planetary upheaval.

While billions have been glued to TV screens for the soccer World Cup this past month, Nature put on a show that saw major flooding on every continent, not least in Brazil where 250 people were killed by flash-flooding and landslides, and a huge sinkhole swallowed streets just miles from one of the host nation's venues. Mid-18th century flood-level records were broken in the U.S. and E.U. There were also a LOT of tornadoes and waterspouts in places that don't normally see them.

The month began and ended with dramatic fireball appearances in the UK. The first one was really weird: a fireball turning circles in the sky! While many are attributing 'intelligence' to this burning object, accounts from previous eras of environmental and social upheaval describe such 'fire in the sky', whose gravity-defying behavior can be explained via plasma physics.

Then there were the hailstorms. 'Baseball-sized hail' used to mean something rare and freakish. Now it's positively common! Last month they were sweeping away piles of hail with diggers in Sao Paulo; this month they did likewise in eastern Spain, Tokyo and Turkey. The damage caused runs into billions of dollars. Iowa's corn crop was savaged, farmers in Turkey are devastated, and this year's fruit crop in Valencia, Spain, was all but wiped out.

Spectacular electrical storms in summertime aren't unusual, but snowfall in regions adjacent to territory scorched by wildfires are: despite earlier heatwaves, snow returned to much of Scandinavia, the Rockies and Western Canada. Speaking of wildfires, so far this year Russia has seen twice the number of wildfires reported last year, while in the U.S. they have already surpassed the 2013 total.

Get ready for the Greatest Show on Earth!


Comment: Correction 6 July 2014

It has been brought to our attention that footage included in this Video Summary of record-breaking flooding in Hungary is in fact from last year, early June 2013.

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