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Question

'Natural' food: Who defines it?

© marciacrawford.net
With consumers confusing natural and organic, the feds must not remain silent any longer.

The natural products business is booming. By some industry estimates, retail sales topped an eye-popping $100 billion last year, with nearly 60 percent coming from food. No wonder more food marketers are labeling their products - from Pepsi to Cheetos - natural. But what does the term actually mean?

Despite the term's popularity - or because of it - there is no official definition of "natural." With the potential to deceive consumers, the issue is now reaching a breaking point. The proposed solutions from trade groups, lawyers and government agencies range from defining the term to suing over it to ignoring it. Some consumer-advocacy organizations are even calling for a complete ban on the use of "natural" in labeling. But such disparate approaches won't help shoppers become any less confused and may even make the problem worse.

One group that wants to define "natural" is called the Organic and Natural Health Association (ONHA), a brand new trade group whose mission includes "creating and promoting transparent business practices that safeguard access to organic and natural food, products, and services." I recently attended Supply Side West, an ingredient trade show, where ONHA hosted a panel about its plan to create a Natural Seal certification based on "objective and transparent criteria." CEO Karen Howard said that "defining the word 'natural' has become a priority for the natural products industry" and that her group plans to "take swift action." (By swift they mean by the end of 2015, Howard told me.)

Comment: Additional articles on The Great Organic Deceivers:

Syringe

More nonsense: Vaccines and "herd immunity"

Hail to the group! The group is all!

The concept of herd immunity (protection for the population) is often used by vaccine addicts as a way to push guilt at people who don't line up, with their children, like robots for their shots.

From the point of view of protecting people who are already vaccinated, herd immunity is flat-out absurd.

Little Jimmy, whose parents have decided not to vaccinate him, will pass diseases on to kids who are already vaccinated? Oh, you mean those immunized kids aren't really safe? Then why did you vaccinate them in the first place?

From another point of view, herd immunity is the idea that people who "can't be" vaccinated (for example, those who are obviously allergic to elements contained in vaccines) will gain a measure of protection, if larger and larger numbers of others are vaccinated.

The vaccinated protecting the unvaccinated.

Comment: Key points to consider when addressing the idea of 'Herd immunity'
  • Even though endemic outbreaks of common childhood diseases, such as measles, have been eliminated in some regions after prolonged mass-vaccination efforts, we are still being constantly reminded that reducing vaccination coverage of children in a community poses the risk of a reimported disease outbreak with potentially dire consequences to infants and immuno-compromised individuals. We are also being persuaded that implementing strict vaccination compliance will prevent an outbreak and protect vaccine-ineligible infants via the herd-immunity effect.
  • There is no question that a disease outbreak can happen in a non-immune community, if a virus gets there. The real question is, how well can high-vaccination compliance ensure herd immunity and protect a community from an outbreak?
  • The belief in herd immunity has no doubt been influencing vaccine-related legislation in many U.S. states and other countries. This notion is used as a trump card to justify and mandate legal measures aiming to increase vaccination compliance. An implicit assumption is that liberal vaccine exemptions somehow compromise this precious herd immunity, which the public-health authorities strive to establish and maintain via vaccination.
  • The medical establishment got it all in reverse: it is not vaccine-exempt children who endanger us all, it is the effects of prolonged mass-vaccination campaigns that have done so. When will the medical establishment (and the media) start paying attention to the long-term consequences of mass-vaccination measures instead of hastily and unjustifiably blaming every outbreak on the unvaccinated?


People

Menopausal symptoms may be lessened with young children in the house

A new study by researchers at The Kinsey Institute and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has found that the timeless, multicultural tradition of grandmothering might have an unexpected benefit: helping some women temper their hot flashes and night sweats during menopause.

The researchers, two clinicians and a bioanthropologist, examined how close relationships can help women in midlife with this inevitable change -- with the clinicians looking for therapeutic benefits that might help patients deal with this unpredictable, poorly understood transition, and the bioanthropologist predicting an evolutionary connection. Their study, which focused on the relationship between mid-life women and young children, found that women who underwent rapid menopause, caused by the surgical removal of ovaries, had fewer hot flashes and night sweats when young children lived in their homes.

The study was published in Menopause: the Journal of the North American Menopause Society. Study authors are Tierney Lorenz, postdoctoral fellow at The Kinsey Institute at Indiana University Bloomington, Bonnie A McGregor, researcher at University of Washington's Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, and Virginia J. Vitzthum, professor of anthropology and senior research scientist at The Kinsey Institute.
Magic Wand

Paying attention to emotions better weight loss strategy than nutritional knowledge

emotional eating
Learning to pay attention to your emotions is a more powerful weight-loss strategy than greater nutritional knowledge, a new study finds.

With obesity rates rising, many policy-makers argue that nutritional education will help people make better decisions.

The new research, though, points to the greater benefits of learning to understand and respond to your own inner states over and above nutritional education.
In one study, published in the Journal of Marketing Research, a group of people were given a nutritional knowledge course and they were taught to recognise basic emotions in both themselves and other people (Kidwell et al., 2014).

A comparison group was given just the nutritional knowledge course.

Part of the emotion training involved being presented with food products and asked to notice how this changed their own emotions, and those of other people.

Comment: One thing that also helps to combat emotional eating is to learn how to de-stress, so you are not using food as a calming agent. One of the best ways to enhance emotional well-being with immediate affects is the Éiriú Eolas program which can be learned online here.

An excellent way to manage weight is to follow a ketogenic diet. This program keeps blood sugar levels stable, gives you more energy and alleviates many health issues. See: The Ketogenic Diet - An Overview

Also see:
Dr. Gabor Maté: "When the Body Says No: Understanding the Stress-Disease Connection"

Green Light

Bilingual brains process information more efficiently

© IOTAGLOBAL
Forget Sudoku: Speaking multiple languages routinely exercises the brain

Speaking more than one language is good for the brain, according to new research that indicates bilingual speakers process information more efficiently and more easily than those who know a single language.

The benefits occur because the bilingual brain is constantly activating both languages and choosing which language to use and which to ignore, said Northwestern University's Viorica Marian, the lead author of the research and a professor in the department of communication sciences and disorders in the School of Communication. When the brain is constantly exercised in this way, it doesn't have to work as hard to perform cognitive tasks, the researchers found.

"It's like a stop light," Marian said. "Bilinguals are always giving the green light to one language and red to another. When you have to do that all the time, you get really good at inhibiting the words you don't need," she said.
Evil Rays

Study finds that cellphone use greatly increases risk of brain cancer

Did you ever wonder how a cell phone might affect your brain? When you think about it, the use of cell phones is massively experimental, as we had no idea what kind of negative effects they might have on people when they were first introduced. Well now, decades after heavy use of cell phones, a study shows that brain tumor rates nearly triple after 25 years of cell phone use.

The Swedish study, published in the journal Pathophysiology, found that the longer someone talked on their phone - in terms of hours and years - the more likely they were to develop glioma, a deadly form of brain cancer.

The study found that, overall, people who used wireless phones for more than a year were at 70% greater risk of brain cancer as compared to those who used wireless phones for a year or less. Those who used wireless phones for more than 25 years were at a 300% greater risk of brain cancer than those who used wireless phones for a year or less.

Dr. Gabriel Zada, a neurosurgeon at the University of Southern California's Keck School of Medicine who wasn't involved in the study, said that the study provides more evidence that cell phones and brain cancer may be linked.

Comment: See also:

Pills

Robin Williams was on anti-depressant drug with 'black box' warning at the time of his suicide; findings downplayed by mainstream media

Robin Williams

The antidepressant found in Williams' toxicology test, Mirtazapine (Remeron), has 10 drug regulatory agency warnings citing suicidal ideation
If news headlines were to be believed about the autopsy findings of beloved actor/comedian Robin Williams, who tragically committed suicide nearly two months ago, no drugs were found in his system at the time of his death, as evidenced by headlines from USA Today, NBC News, the BBC and others proclaiming "no alcohol or drugs" were found. These headlines couldn't be more wrong.

The medical examiner's report cites an antidepressant drug was in Williams' system at the time of his death. The particular antidepressant, Mirtazapine, (also known as Remeron) carries 10 international drug regulatory warnings on causing suicidal ideation.

Comment: Peace of mind cannot be found in a pill. It's sad that so many people are duped into taking a drug that causes the exact opposite of what they are hoping for. Rest in peace, Robin.

When it comes to Anti-depressants, it appears profit, not benefits, outweigh the risks

Warning: Antidepressants May Led to Suicidal Tendencies

Psychological side-effects of anti-depressants worse than thought

Syringe

Ebola treatment trials using survivors' blood and test drugs to start in west Africa

ebola trials

Global aid agency Doctors Without Borders said on Thursday it would begin unprecedented trials within a month on Ebola drugs and blood from survivors using patients in west Africa.
Global aid agency Doctors Without Borders said on Thursday it would begin unprecedented trials on patients in west Africa to test Ebola drugs and the use of survivors' blood as therapy.

The trials in Guinea are aimed at rushing out an emergency therapy to battle an epidemic which has taken more than 5,000 lives since December.

"This is an unprecedented international partnership which represents hope for patients to finally get a real treatment against a disease that today kills between 50 and 80 percent of those infected," said Annick Antierens, who is coordinating the trials for the medical charity, known by its French initials MSF.

The first trials are due to start in December and results could be available by February next year, MSF said.

Ebola, transmitted through bodily fluids, leads to haemorrhagic fever and -- in an estimated 70 percent of cases in the current outbreak -- death.

There is no specific treatment regime and, as yet, no licensed vaccine -- although one of the leading candidates, known as ChAd3 and made by Britain's GlaxoSmithKline, is being tested in Mali and elsewhere.

Patients' best chance of survival, if their condition is caught early enough, is taking paracetamol for their fever, rehydrating and being kept well nourished.
Cell Phone

Forty-four reasons cell phones can cause cancer

© Whyweweb.com
Cell phones emit microwave radio-frequency radiation. Fact.

This radiation has the ability to penetrate our bodies. Fact.

Our governments do virtually nothing to protect us from these dangers. Fact.

And yet there is strong evidence, multiple peer reviewed studies, to indicate that cell phones cause cancer and other diseases.

Take a look for yourself at these facts.

But first let's just consider what cancer is.

Cancer And DNA

The National Cancer Institute says,
"Cancer is a term used for diseases in which abnormal cells divide without control and are able to invade other tissues.....all cancers begin in cells......cells grow and divide in a controlled way to produce more cells as they are needed to keep the body healthy. When cells become old or damaged, they die and are replaced with new cells. However, sometimes this orderly process goes wrong. The genetic material (DNA) of a cell can become damaged or changed, producing mutations that affect normal cell growth and division. When this happens, cells do not die when they should and new cells form when the body does not need them."
© National Cancer Institute
So cancer typically involves abnormal cell division and DNA damage and in some cases cells may form a mass of tissue called a tumor.

Comment: See also:

What the cellphone industry doesn't want you to know about radiation concerns

What's Wi-Fi doing to us? Experiment finds that shrubs die when placed next to wireless routers

Attention

Candy colored single use detergent pods poisoning children in alarming numbers

detergent pods
More than 17,000 small children were harmed by single-use detergent packages in just over a year.


Kids often see the bright red and blue of laundry pods and mistake them as candy, and they're heading to emergency rooms in alarming numbers.

More than 17,000 incidents of children ingesting laundry-detergent packages had been recorded by poison-control centers across the nation between 2012 and 2013, according to a report in the journal Pediatrics. One child has even died after ingesting the ingredients of the pods.

Laundry pods, which are jaw-breaker sized single-use containers of concentrated liquid detergent, have a flexible outer membrane that can easily be perforated by young children trying to bite into them, says the study.

The pods, which often come in bright multi-color combinations, to show that cleaning ingredients will be mixed in the wash, may resemble hard candies or even the teething toys often given to children.

Comment: It's interesting yet sadly unsurprising, that it never occurred to the manufacturers of these pods, that the design and candy-color would make it appealing for a small child to eat. But then, as profit trumps everything, considering the health and safety of consumers is really not their problem! Notice that few bothered to change the design even after being warned of the dangers to children.

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