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Syringe

Elmo: Corporate America's latest pro-vaccine whore

Everyone loves Elmo, that cute furry little muppet spokesperson for the pre-school set. But there's a deep, dark secret behind his adorable visage.

I hate to break it to you, but Elmo is a whore.

He's being pimped out.

Harsh, right? Well, prostitution is the act of selling oneself for money. And Elmo is now the cutest little spokesperson around for pro-vaccine propaganda. Watch the following video right from the Sesame Street corner. Keep a barf bag handy.

Sun

Lack of sun exposure causing huge increase in cases of rickets in young children


Rickets is caused by a deficiency in vitamin D and causes bone deformities such as bowed legs, pictured, and a curvature of the spine
Doctors have called for under-fours to be given free vitamins after a rise in the number of cases of rickets due to a lack of exposure to sunlight.

The country's chief medical officer Dame Sally Davies is said to be concerned at the number of children suffering from the condition, which is caused by a deficiency in vitamin D.

The disease, a scourge of Victorian Britain, was virtually eradicated after the Second World War but is returning as more and more youngsters are used to staying indoors playing video games than going outside.

Now, it has been reported that Professor Davies has ordered the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (Nice) to review the cost of providing vitamin supplements to all children under the age of four, in a bid to reverse the trend.

The move is being supported by one of Britain's leading experts on vitamin D deficiency at University College Hospital London Alastair Sutcliffe, who has spoken about an 'epidemic' of cases due to a lack of sun exposure and overuse of sunscreen.

He told the Sunday Times: 'Nothing is free but the cost of the ill-effects of deficiency, such as rickets and anaemia from families not providing children with these supplements is greater for the NHS.

Comment: Getting adequate sunshine and supplementing with Vitamin D3 when necessary will help prevent a host of diseases that are associated with low levels of the vitamin. Deficiencies can lead to obesity, diabetes, hypertension, depression, fibromyalgia, chronic fatigue syndrome, osteoporosis, and neuro-degenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, in addition to some types of cancers like breast, prostate, and colon. It is also important to know that if you have a low vitamin D level in spite of taking supplements, a magnesium deficiency can be one of the reasons you can't correct it. Be aware that it is quite difficult to obtain enough magnesium from food sources as our soils have been deficient in magnesium for decades, so supplementation may be necessary.


Shoe

Movements of ADHD children vital to how they remember information and workout complex cognitive tasks


New research shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study.
For decades, frustrated parents and teachers have barked at fidgety children with ADHD to "Sit still and concentrate!"

But new research conducted at UCF shows that if you want ADHD kids to learn, you have to let them squirm. The foot-tapping, leg-swinging and chair-scooting movements of children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder are actually vital to how they remember information and work out complex cognitive tasks, according to a study published in an early online release of the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

The findings show the longtime prevailing methods for helping children with ADHD may be misguided.

"The typical interventions target reducing hyperactivity. It's exactly the opposite of what we should be doing for a majority of children with ADHD," said one of the study's authors, Mark Rapport, head of the Children's Learning Clinic at the University of Central Florida. "The message isn't 'Let them run around the room,' but you need to be able to facilitate their movement so they can maintain the level of alertness necessary for cognitive activities."

Question

Which comes first: The leaky gut or the dysfunctional immune system?

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I was asked by healthline.com to comment on a new study from researchers at Lund University in Sweden that was published earlier this month in the journal PLoS ONE. The study is entitled Intestinal Barrier Dysfunction Develops at the Onset of Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis, and Can Be Induced by Adoptive Transfer of Auto-Reactive T Cells. Yep, that's a mouthful, but hang in there. This study is absolutely fascinating and is very relevant to everyone battling autoimmune disease. It's so interesting that I'm devoting an entire blog post to it!

Comment: Learn more about the importance of Gut health listen to The Health and Wellness Show - 13 April 2015 - Connecting the Dots


Pills

Negative thoughts? Try probiotics

New research finds that our gut bacteria linked with negative thinking - and supplementing probiotics can reduce negative thoughts.
Negative thinking is defined as a spiraling of thinking that takes a person from one negative thought to the next. Often this is lightly attributed to getting up on the wrong side of the bed. But now we find it may also be a case of 'bad bugs'.

Could the little microbes teeming in our gut have anything to do with negative thinking? Surely not, you say smugly.

Think again.

Triple-blind study finds probiotics affect negative thoughts

Research from the Leiden Institute for Brain and Cognition in The Netherlands has determined that one's gut bacteria indeed will affect our negative thinking and cognitive state.

Comment: For more on probiotics see: Also, listen to the Health and Wellness show's episode on gut health.


Pills

Journal of Clinical Psychiatry Study: 70% of people on antidepressants don't have depression

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If sales for antidepressants such as Zoloft, Lexapro, or Prozac tell us anything, it's that depression is sweeping the nation. But a new study questions the validity of most of these sales. The study has found that the majority of individuals on antidepressants - a whopping 69% - do not even meet the criteria for clinical depression. These individuals are likely just experiencing normal sadness and hardships that most of us experience.

In addition to finding that nearly two-thirds of antidepressant-takers don't meet criteria for depression, the researchers also note how 38% of those taking antidepressants for other psychiatric disorders do not meet the criteria. These include panic disorder, obsessive compulsive disorder, social phobio, general anxiety, and a number of other arguably fabricated mental disorders.

Comment: 'Manufacturing Depression': Are Doctors Overprescribing Antidepressants?
Is depression manufactured? Two decades after the introduction of antidepressants, it's become commonplace to assume that our sadness can be explained in terms of a disease called depression. The National Institute of Mental Health estimates more than 14 million Americans suffer from major depression every year and more than three million suffer from minor depression. Some 30 million Americans take antidepressants at a cost of over $10 billion a year.

My next guest argues while depression can be debilitating, it's also been largely manufactured by doctors and drug companies as a medical condition with a biological cause that can be treated with prescription medication. Psychotherapist and writer Gary Greenberg participated in a clinical trial for antidepressant medication and found that more often than not the drugs failed to outperform placebos. His latest book is a scientific, medical, historical and cultural exploration of the antidepressant revolution here in the United States. It's called Manufacturing Depression: The Secret History of a Modern Disease.



Arrow Up

Big Pharma continues to lose credibility

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When you visit the websites for leading pharmaceutical companies such as Pfizer and Novartis, you'll find mission statements that will feed you with inspiring goals such as "improve health and well-being," "provide access to safe, effective and affordable medicines," and "to prevent and cure diseases, to ease suffering and to enhance the quality of life."

Who still believes this? Let's keep it straight: major pharmaceutical companies are in the business of dealing drugs and making money. Here's some food for thought that might make you question the credibility of pharmaceutical companies.

Comment: Drugged up America: Exposing Big Pharma


Stormtrooper

Monsanto is the Department of Homeland Security for food

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© occupy.com
Monsanto's death grip on your food
"Whenever people encounter a crazy idea, a high-flying absurd notion, they reject it out of hand. That's the first impulse. 'No, no one would believe that. It's ridiculous.' But as time passes, and this crazy idea is repeated over and over again, people make adjustments to their own minds. 'Well, maybe it's true, a lot of important authorities accept it, so maybe I should accept it. I guess it does make sense.' This is the process of buying a cover story, buying an egregious lie meant to obscure a hidden truth." (The Underground, Jon Rappoport)
Being the US government means being on permanent wartime status.

Wherever it is possible to fantasize enemies, enemies are there. They must be conquered. They must be stopped.

Comment: Monsanto hates democracy: Fascism seems to work best
Nine out of 10 of us want to know where Monsanto's been hiding the GMOs in our food and a most of us wouldn't eat those GMOs if we knew where they were.

If everything in this country were decided democratically, most of the food we eat would be non-GMO and Monsanto would be driven out of business.

We don't have a problem convincing people we're right, we have a problem with our democracy when we can't get the politicians to pass the laws that the majority of us want.

...

The Obama Administration is currently negotiating two huge new trade deals, one with Europe and one with countries around the Pacific , including Japan and Peru. The US position is that bans on GMOs, but also pre-market safety testing and labels, are barriers to trade. The person who's negotiating this for Obama is Islam Siddiqui who used to be the Vice President and Chief Lobbyist for CropLife America - that's Monsanto, Dupont, Dow, Syngenta, Bayer and BASF, that's the group that sent a letter of protest to Michelle Obama when she planted her pesticide-free and GMO-free organic garden. Siddiqui is a political operator. He got is job with Obama by fundraising for Obama. Before working as a lobbyist for Monsanto and the rest, he worked for Clinton trying to get GMOs, sewage sludge and irradiation into organic.



Pills

Oral contraceptive pill could be altering the physical structure of your brain

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© Point Fr/ Shutterstock
The pill is a very popular contraceptive choice for women, with around 100 million individuals worldwide currently using it. There is no doubt that it has helped revolutionize contraception, and most users report satisfaction, but it is also apparent that it can cause undesirable side effects in women. For example, many studies have demonstrated that its use is associated with metabolic and emotional effects, and one study even found it could influence a woman's choice of partner.

Now, a new investigation is adding to the growing body of evidence that the pill may be associated with neurological alterations, with the discovery that oral contraceptives are linked to thinning in two different regions of the brain, possibly altering their function.

Magnify

Study finds Alzheimer's may be linked to a misfiring immune system

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© Reuters/Oswaldo Rivas
Researchers have found that some immune cells designed to protect the brain from infection start consuming an amino acid called arginine, triggering the onset of classical hallmarks of the disease, including brain plaques and memory loss.

The study, carried out by researchers at Duke University and published April 15 in the Journal of Neuroscience, demonstrated that particular immune cells that are meant to protect the brain start to become destructive and consume an essential nutrient known as arginine.

Senior author Carol Colton, professor of neurology at the Duke University School of Medicine, said the new research not only indicates the potential cause of Alzheimer's, but also may eventually lead to a new treatment therapy.

"If indeed arginine consumption is so important to the disease process, maybe we could block it and reverse the disease," Colton said in the Duke University press release.