Health & Wellness
Map


Ambulance

New York City hospital testing a healthcare worker for Ebola

© Reuters/Fabian Bimmer
A volunteer of the German army Bundeswehr, wearing a protective suit, is disinfected by a colleague during an Ebola training session at the Marseille barracks in Appen, October 23, 2014.
A New York City hospital is running Ebola tests on a healthcare worker who returned to the United States from West Africa with a fever and gastrointestinal symptoms, the city's Health Department said on Thursday.

Preliminary test results were expected in the next 12 hours, the New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene said in a statement.

The patient being treated at Bellevue Hospital is a healthcare worker who returned to the United States within the past 21 days from one of the three African countries facing the Ebola outbreak, it said.

The Health Department said it was tracing all of the patient's contacts to identify anyone who may be at potential risk. It also said the patient had been transported by a specially trained unit wearing protective gear.
Family

Omega 3 can help children with ADD


Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a certain kind of ADHD.
Supplements of the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 can help children and adolescents who have a certain kind of ADHD. These are the findings of a dissertation at the Sahlgrenska Academy, University of Gothenburg, which also indicates that a special cognitive training program can improve problem behavior in children with ADHD.

Between three to six percent of all school age children are estimated to have ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder). ADHD is a disorder that entails a difficulty controlling impulses and temper, sitting still, waiting, or being attentive for more than short periods at a time. There are various kinds of ADHD where disturbances in attention, hyperactivity and impulsivity have varying degrees of prominence.

ADHD is often treated with stimulant medications, which are effective for most, but do not work for everyone.

Relevant improvement

In this study, 75 children and adolescents with ADHD were given either the fatty acids omega 3 and 6 or a placebo over three months, and then they were all given omega 3/6 over three months. The study was conducted double-blind, which means that neither the researchers nor the participants were allowed to know whether they received the active capsules until afterwards.

"For the group as a whole, we did not see any major improvement, but in 35 percent of the children and adolescents who have the inattentive subtype of ADHD called ADD, the symptoms improved so much that we can talk about a clinically relevant improvement," says Mats Johnson, doctoral student at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg.

Comment: It's important to remember that there are several studies linking ADHD to diet and changing the diet could help.

Study: Western Diet Link to ADHD

Study: Cutting Out Suspect Foods Could Help Calm ADHD Children

Do Synthetic Food Colors Cause Hyperactivity?

Family

Sleep difficulties common among toddlers with psychiatric disorders


Sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders.
John Boekamp, Ph.D., clinical director of the Pediatric Partial Hospital Program (PPHP) at Bradley Hospital recently led a study that found sleep difficulties -- particularly problems with falling asleep -- were very common among toddlers and preschool-aged children who were receiving clinical treatment for a wide range of psychiatric disorders. The study, titled "Sleep Onset and Night Waking Insomnias in Preschoolers with Psychiatric Disorders," is now published online in the journal Child Psychiatry & Human Development.

"The most common sleep difficulties reported nationally for toddlers and preschoolers are problems of going to bed, falling asleep and frequent night awakenings -- collectively, these problems are referred to as behavioral insomnias of childhood," said Boekamp. "Sleep problems in young children frequently co-occur with other behavioral problems, with evidence that inadequate sleep is associated with daytime sleepiness, less optimal preschool adjustment, and problems of irritability, hyperactivity and attention."

Boekamp's team was interested in learning more about sleep and sleep problems in young children with behavior problems, as early sleep problems may be both a cause and consequence of children's difficulties with behavioral and emotional self-regulation. "Essentially, these young children might be caught in a cycle, with sleep disruption affecting their psychiatric symptoms and psychiatric symptoms affecting their sleep-wake organization," said Boekamp.
Ambulance

A vegetarian diet does something terrible to men

© Reuters / Jason Lee
But is he damaging his chances of fathering a child?
The general belief is that vegetarians are usually healthier. However, studies conducted in the U.S. are showing some detrimental side-effects to the sperm of male vegetarians.

In an experiment done by researchers at Loma Linda University, 443 meat-eaters and 31 vegetarians and vegans were monitored between 2009 and 2013. They initially assumed vegetarians' sperm would be healthy, but here's what they found, according to lead study author Eliza Orzylowska:
"We found that diet does significantly affect sperm quality. Vegetarian and vegan diets were associated with much lower sperm counts than omnivorous diets. Although these people are not infertile, it is likely to play a factor in conception, particularly for couples who are trying to conceive naturally, the old-fashioned way."
They also found that vegetarians had 30 percent lower concentrations of sperm (50 million per milliliter versus 70 million) and that their sperm was also weaker in terms of movement. For vegetarians, only 30 percent of their sperm were active, as compared to 60 percent of their meat-eating counterparts.

Comment: Don't miss:

- Real men don't eat carbs

- Lierre Keith on 'The Vegetarian Myth - Food, Justice and Sustainability'

- Burying The Vegetarian Hypothesis

Magnify

Why people with Down syndrome invariably develop Alzheimer's disease

Amyloid plaques
© Juan Gartner
Amyloid plaques are found in the brains of people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's disease.
A new study by researchers at Sanford-Burnham reveals the process that leads to changes in the brains of individuals with Down syndrome -- the same changes that cause dementia in Alzheimer's patients. The findings, published in Cell Reports, have important implications for the development of treatments that can prevent damage in neuronal connectivity and brain function in Down syndrome and other neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative conditions, including Alzheimer's disease.

Down syndrome is characterized by an extra copy of chromosome 21 and is the most common chromosome abnormality in humans. It occurs in about one per 700 babies in the United States, and is associated with a mild to moderate intellectual disability. Down syndrome is also associated with an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease. By the age of 40, nearly 100 percent of all individuals with Down syndrome develop the changes in the brain associated with Alzheimer's disease, and approximately 25 percent of people with Down syndrome show signs of Alzheimer's-type dementia by the age of 35, and 75 percent by age 65. As the life expectancy for people with Down syndrome has increased dramatically in recent years -- from 25 in 1983 to 60 today -- research aimed to understand the cause of conditions that affect their quality of life are essential.

"Our goal is to understand how the extra copy of chromosome 21 and its genes cause individuals with Down syndrome to have a greatly increased risk of developing dementia," said Huaxi Xu, Ph.D., professor in the Degenerative Diseases Program and senior author of the paper. "Our new study reveals how a protein called sorting nexin 27 (SNX27) regulates the generation of beta-amyloid -- the main component of the detrimental amyloid plaques found in the brains of people with Down syndrome and Alzheimer's. The findings are important because they explain how beta-amyloid levels are managed in these individuals."
Bulb

Ebola scare motivating interest in immune system functioning and alternative therapies

ebola
© FP Dominique Faget
We are witnessing a stunning reversal of events in the face of the present Ebola scare consuming North America. The drum beatings of fear played all to often by the mainstream media have given way to a symphony of personal empowerment, education, and a mass social movement to take back our health freedom.

The threat of Ebola initially grabbed headlines and paralyzed millions who lacked understanding. Answers were sought amidst the fear peddling and confusion yet few were being found. A disheartened population is now storming the 'alternative' media and independent health networks, websites, and radio shows for direction. What they are finding is currently propelling us all into a new, decentralized health paradigm.

To the disbelief of pharmaceutical companies, people across North America are taking the time to understand what their immune system is. They are then shocked to find out that it's weak, damaged, and under attack daily. Like true warriors, most are activated into action and begin researching.

Comment: One of the best ways to improve the immune system is to begin to de-toxify the body, eliminating inflammatory foods, GMO ingredients, gluten and casein. Following a ketogenic diet improves immune system functioning while also ameliorating and even preventing a host of diseases. Here are some suggestions to begin implementing now:

The Ketogenic Diet - An Overview

Vitamin C - A cure for Ebola

Natural allopathic treatment modalities for Ebola

Scientists stumble across the obvious treatment for Ebola: tobacco

Dollar

Anger over 'cash for diagnoses' dementia plan in England

Cash for Diagnosis
© Alamy
Ministers have pledged to dramatically improve rates of dementia diagnosis, which has led to the new scheme.
Family doctors will be paid £55 for every patient they diagnose with dementia under a new NHS England scheme which has been condemned as an "ethical travesty".

Leading GPs said the national project amounted to "cash for diagnoses" - allowing doctors to make a direct profit if they classify patients as suffering from dementia.

In some parts of the country, NHS authorities have gone still further - offering family doctors £200 for each new diagnosis made, The Telegraph can reveal.

Patients groups and doctors have condemned the schemes, saying they amounted to a "bounty on the head" of the most vulnerable, which could cloud the judgements of those making diagnoses.

Under the national scheme, doctors can receive the £55 payment for every extra patient given a diagnosis of dementia in the six months ending in March.

GPs qualify for payment if they diagnose the patients themselves - with no checks on whether their assessment is correct - or if they update their records when their patients receive a diagnosis in hospital.

Family doctors are already financially rewarded for carrying a host of medical checks, with a portion of their pay related to tasks such as taking blood pressure, measuring cholesterol and carrying out tests for conditions such as diabetes.

But the scheme is understood to be the first national initiative to offer doctors financial rewards for diagnosing patients with any condition.

It follows pledges by ministers to dramatically improve rates of dementia diagnosis.
Bandaid

World Health Organization declares Nigeria is Ebola-free, holds lessons for others

© REUTERS/Stringer
Students of Goverment Secondary School Garki wash their hands, as school resumes in Abuja September 22, 2014.
Nigeria was declared free of the deadly Ebola virus on Monday after a determined doctor and thousands of officials and volunteers helped end an outbreak still ravaging other parts of West Africa and threatening the United States and Spain.

Caught unawares when a diplomat arrived with the disease from Liberia, authorities were alerted by Doctor Ameyo Adadevoh, who diagnosed it, kept him in hospital despite protests from him and his government and later died from Ebola herself.

They then set about trying to contain it in an overcrowded city of 21 million where it could easily have turned a doomsday scenario if about 300 people who had been in direct or indirect contact with him not been traced and isolated.

"This is a spectacular success story," Rui Gama Vaz from the World Health Organization (WHO) told a news conference in the capital Abuja, where officials broke into applause when he announced that Nigeria had shaken off the disease.

"It shows that Ebola can be contained, but we must be clear that we have only won a battle, the war will only end when West Africa is also declared free of Ebola."

This year's outbreak of the highly infectious hemorrhagic fever thought to have originated in forest bats is the worst on record.
Magnify

Research shows bitter melon kills cancer and stops diabetes

bitter melon
© Healthy Hobbit
According to Dr. Frank Shallenberger, when it comes to fighting cancer, he's always looking for natural substances that interrupt the odd metabolism of cancer cells. Some of his discoveries include resveratrol, green tea, Seanol, and others. Most recently, he found a fruit that was effective in killing pancreatic cancer cells. The fruit is called "bitter melon" and is popular in Okinawa, Japan.

When bitter melon juice is diluted to 5% in water, it proved itself to be incredibly damaging to pancreatic cancer cell lines. According to researchers, bitter melon juice reduced the viability of two cancer cell lines by 90% and killed the remaining two lines at a rate of 98%.

So, great, these studies work in cancer cells in a dish. But do they work in animals? Will they work in people? Apparently yes. University of Colorado researchers administered bitter melon doses to mice and found a 64% reduction in pancreatic tumor size without any kind of side effect.
Bacon n Eggs

Breakfast rich in protein boosts dopamine and diminishes food cravings

egg_sausage_bacon
© www.samscornerdeli.com
New research shows that eating a good breakfast - particularly one rich in protein - boosts a critical neurotransmitter, which may lower food cravings later in the day.

The research comes as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that many teens skip breakfast and adolescent obesity has quadrupled in the last 30 years.

Dr. Heather Leidy, an assistant professor of nutrition and exercise physiology who led the study, said:

"Our research showed that people experience a dramatic decline in cravings for sweet foods when they eat breakfast.

However, breakfasts that are high in protein also reduced cravings for savory - or high-fat - foods.

On the other hand, if breakfast is skipped, these cravings continue to rise throughout the day."

Comment: Many people skip breakfast or load up on high-carb foods. Skipping the first meal of the day causes you to eat more at lunch and primes your brain to seek out unhealthier, higher-calorie foods. Carbohydrates cause insulin levels to spike, then precipitously drop, which sets up a roller-coaster of food cravings. One of the best ways to improve health and metabolism is to switch to a ketogenic diet, which is rich in saturated fat, with moderate protein intake and minimal carbohydrates. This diet also helps to alleviate and prevent a host of diseases. See:

High-fat low-carb ketogenic diets beginning to earn mainstream respect

The Ketogenic Diet - An Overview

The art and science of nutritional ketosis Stephen Phinney

Top