NEW! Book available now on Amazon

The Cassiopaea Experiment Transcripts 1994 (Volume 1)

by Laura Knight-Jadczyk

The Cassiopaea Experiment is unique in the history of channeling, mediumship, and parapsychology. For years prior to the first Cassiopaean transmission, Laura Knight-Jadczyk went to great lengths to study the channeling phenomenon, including its history, its inherent strengths, weaknesses, dangers, and the various theories and methods developed in the past. After having exhausted the standard literature in search of answers to the fundamental problems of humanity, Laura and her colleagues (including her husband, mathematical physicist Arkadiusz Jadczyk) have held regular sittings for more than twenty years.

For the first time in print, this volume includes complete transcripts of 36 experimental sessions conducted in 1994. Questions and answers have been annotated extensively, giving unprecedented insight into the background and interpersonal dynamics of the early Cassiopaea Experiment. The sessions of this year introduced many of the themes that would recur in more detail over the next twenty years, including such topics as cyclical cometary bombardment of the Earth, the solar companion hypothesis, ancient history, metaphysics, the hyperdimensional nature of reality, and the possibility of evolution of humanity.

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Science of the Spirit
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Smiley

Laughter shown to improve age-related memory loss

laughing woman
© unknown
You don't need a doctor to tell you that a giggle session is good for the soul, but new research shows that it can also be good for your brain.

A recent study of people with diabetes (rising numbers in North America) found that laughter could reduce age-related memory loss.

I'm all for it! Life is short, after all, and if can't have a bring-you-to-tears laughter session now and again, well, what's it all for?

Comment: See also:

Bulb

On the nature of mind and brain

© evolutionezine.net
What is the true nature of mind, and what is the real function of our brains? The purpose of this article is to provide evidence that strongly indicates that you are not your brain, or your body for that matter, and that the nature of mind, of memory, and of our brains may actually be vastly different than we have been led to believe.

Since time immemorial, man has been fascinated by the mind, leading great thinkers from Hippocrates to Descartes to ponder the nature of mind with wonder. Fast forward to modern times and observe how the mind is still revered and is dominating our culture. We have a lot of firm beliefs about the nature of mind, and I believe the ego - our limited perception of ourselves - and thus human ignorance, is intricately tied in with these beliefs.

But the truth of the matter is that we only understand a fraction of the minds potential, i.e. it's capability of rote memorization and other analytically orientated functions, and we use even less.

We know hardly anything about the brain let alone the nature of mind. Is it possible that we are missing crucial aspects of its function and entire areas of development and potential that simply slide under the radar because they are not accepted by modern thought?
Bulb

Brain cells in amygdala make judgments based on a viewer's subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed

Cedars-Sinai-led investigators say some brain cells in a structure called the amygdala appear to make judgments based on a viewer's subjective opinions instead of true emotion expressed.

When evaluating another person's emotions - happy, sad, angry, afraid - humans take cues from facial expressions. Neurons in a part of the brain called the amygdala "fire" in response to the visual stimulation as information is processed by the retina, the amygdala and a network of interconnected brain structures. Some of these regions respond just to the actual features of the face, whereas others respond to how things appear to the viewer, but it is unknown where in the brain this difference arises.

Although the amygdala's importance in face recognition and emotional assessment is well-known, little is understood about how these processes work, but research led by investigators at Cedars-Sinai and the California Institute of Technology has found that at least some of the brain cells that specialize in recognizing emotions may represent judgments based on the viewer's preconceptions rather than the true emotion being expressed.

With colleagues from Huntington Memorial Hospital, using electrodes placed deep in the brain for unrelated diagnostic purposes, investigators recorded electrical activity of individual neurons and found a subset that were "emotion-selective" because their responses distinguished between happy and fearful faces.
People

Are you seen as jerk at work? A new study reveals that many people are oblivious to how they come across to counterparts and colleagues

Jill Abramson was recently ousted from her position as the executive editor of The New York Times for being, among other things, too "pushy." But did Abramson - who has also been described by the media as "polarizing" and "brusque" - know during the course of her tenure that others viewed her as being overly assertive? A new study from the Columbia Business School suggests that there's a great chance she didn't.

"Finding the middle ground between being pushy and being a pushover is a basic challenge in social life and the workplace. We've now found that the challenge is compounded by the fact that people often don't know how others see their assertiveness," said Daniel Ames, professor of management at Columbia Business School and co - author of the new study. "In the language of Goldilocks, many people are serving up porridge that others see as too hot or too cold, but they mistakenly think the temperature comes across as just right - that their assertiveness is seen as appropriate. To our surprise, we also found that many people whose porridge was actually seen as just right mistakenly thought their porridge came off as too hot. That is, they were asserting themselves appropriately in the eyes of others, but they incorrectly thought they were pushing too hard."
Clipboard

Ever wonder how blind people dream?

© Unknown
Ever wonder how blind people dream? Though some can dream visually, most of them use their other senses, namely hearing and touch.

A new study, published in the journal Sleep Medicine, shows that being blind certainly alters how one dreams. For the study, researchers observed 11 congenially blind, 14 late blind, and 25 sighted control participants over the course of four weeks. Every morning, participants completed surveys in relation to sensory construction of the dream, its emotional and thematic content, and the possible occurrence of nightmares. Scientists also tested participants' ability to produce visual images during waking cognition, sleep quality, and depression and anxiety levels.

Overall, the blind heard sounds and voices more than they saw anything in their dreams. The late-blind group, however, did experience some visual dreaming. All blind participants were also about four times more likely to have nightmares. Although the scientists didn't know why, they concluded that the blind might feel more threatened than other non-blind people.
Hearts

Gut Feelings: Listen to your intuition

© smartorg.com
Have you ever been in a situation where your "gut feeling" told you one thing, but your rational mind said another? If you went with your brain rather than your intuition, there's a good chance you ended up regretting your decision. Your intuition is the subconscious leader that many people fail to give proper respect to. But learning to listen to this internal compass could help you make better decisions and live a more fulfilling life.
"I define intuition as the subtle knowing without ever having any idea why you know it," explains Sophy Burnham, bestselling author of The Art of Intuition, to The Huffington Post. "It's different from thinking, it's different from logic or analysis ... It's a knowing without knowing."
It's unconscious reasoning, the guidance that compels you to turn left when all signs may be pointing right. It's often the whisper inside that can lead you to the best results possible, if you will just learn to let go and give it a chance.

Comment: Additional information about the relationship between the gut and intuition:

Info

Near-death experiences are overwhelmingly peaceful

NDE
© Adri Berger/Getty Images
Near-death experiences often feature out-of-body episodes.
Near-death experiences are rare, but if you have one, it is likely to be overwhelmingly peaceful, however painful it might have been to get to that stage. This is the conclusion from the first study into how the cause of trauma affects the content of a near-death experience.

Such episodes are often described as emotionally rich, involving out-of-body sensations, tunnels of light and flashbacks. They most often occur when a person has been resuscitated after a traumatic event.

Steven Laureys, a neuroscientist at the University of Liège in Belgium who works with people in comas and vegetative states, started to investigate after his patients told him of their own near-death experiences. "I kept hearing these incredible stories in my consultations," he says. "Knowing how abnormal brain activity is during a cardiac arrest or trauma, it was impressive how rich these memories were. It was very intriguing."

There are several hypothesises as to how these events arise, such as lack of oxygen to the brain or damage to areas that control emotion. "So you'd expect to see differences between near-death experiences after drowning and those of other traumas," he says.

His team looked at 190 documented events that resulted from traumas including cardiac arrest, drowning, head injury and high anxiety. Using statistical analysis and a measurement called the Greyson scale to assess the number and intensity of different features of the near-death experiences, the team discovered that surprisingly, the reports shared many similarities.
Blackbox

Science explains why you can't remember being a baby

babies
© AFP/Getty Images
Why don't you remember being a baby? How come you barely remember being a young child? How come a three-year-old can remember things that happened - but will then have no memories of that day a few years later?

These questions have puzzled people for ages. And a new paper in the journal Science provides the first evidence of a physical mechanism that might explain this odd phenomenon.

The paper, which studied rodents, concludes that the new cells that are constantly being formed in very young brains may be messing up the circuits that hold memories.
Family

Early life stress can leave lasting impacts on the brain

stress effect on brain
© Jamie Hanson and Seth Pollak
Different forms of early life stress, such as child maltreatment or poverty, impacted the size of two important brain regions: the hippocampus (shown in red) and amygdala (shown in green), according to new University of Wisconsin–Madison research. Children who experienced such stress had small amygdalae and hippocampai, which was related to behavioral problems in these same individuals.
For children, stress can go a long way. A little bit provides a platform for learning, adapting and coping. But a lot of it - chronic, toxic stress like poverty, neglect and physical abuse - can have lasting negative impacts.

A team of University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers recently showed these kinds of stressors, experienced in early life, might be changing the parts of developing children's brains responsible for learning, memory and the processing of stress and emotion. These changes may be tied to negative impacts on behavior, health, employment and even the choice of romantic partners later in life.

The study, published in the journal Biological Psychiatry, could be important for public policy leaders, economists and epidemiologists, among others, says study lead author and recent UW Ph.D. graduate Jamie Hanson.
Health

Tree hugging is good for you

It has now been confirmed by science that hugging trees can beneficially affect human health by altering vibrational frequency.
tree hugging
© Flickr/Andrea Willa
Hugging a tree may have gained popularity as a maligned hippy practice, but it has now been validated by science to be incredibly beneficial for both people and the planet. Contrary to popular belief, hugging - or even just being in the vicinity of - a tree can boost one's health in several ways.

In a recently published book by author Matthew Silverstone, Blinded by Science, evidence confirming trees and their healthful benefits includes their effect on mental illnesses, Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), concentration levels, reaction times, depression, and the ability to alleviate headaches.
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