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Cloud Lightning

Severe weather in India claims 1 life and injures 120

India severe storm
© Javed Raja
A waterlogged road after the shower in Ahmedabad on Sunday.
Even as the sudden heavy showers that lashed the city on Sunday evening brought much respite to people in Ahmedabad from the soaring heat, one person was reported to have been crushed to death under the weight of an uprooted tree at Nava Vadaj. At least 120 people have also been reportedly injured in separate incidents across the city.

Earlier in the day, the temperature in the city had touched 39.8 degree Celsius, according to the Met office. The downpour continued till late in the evening, leading to several mishaps across the city.
Cloud Grey

Floods in Serbia prompt evacuation of more than 400 families

Serbia flooding
© Unknown
Flood waves on several rivers and their tributaries in Serbia have prompted the evacuation of at least 440 families in the last two days, leaving thousands of people without water and power supply.

An emergency situation has been declared in five municipalities, but there have been no casualties. The damage caused by the floods that have hit parts of the western, central and eastern Serbia is not possible to estimate until the rivers recede.
Arrow Down

Another huge sinkhole threatens two homes in Florida

© WFTV
Two vacant homes threatened by a huge sinkhole in Villages neighborhood, Sumter County, Florida on April 20, 2014

OMG! This monster sinkhole almost swallowed two homes on Chalmer Terrace in the Villages in Sumter County, Florida on April 20, 2014.

The huge sinkhole measures about 50-foot wide and threatens two vacant houses in central Florida. It was created by heavy rains during the Easter week-end.

Comment: Note that the sinkhole was filled in, then reopened!



Clipboard

Life on Earth is not suffering from rising temperatures and atmospheric CO2 levels

Note: This op-ed is apparently too hot for some editors to handle. Late last week it was accepted and posted on politix.topix.com only to be abruptly removed some two hours later. After several hours of attempting to determine why it was removed, I was informed the topix.com editor had permanently taken it down because of a strong negative reaction to it and because of "conflicting views from the scientific community" over factual assertions in the piece.

Fortunately, some media outlets recognize a vigorous scientific debate persists over humanity's influence on climate and those outlets refuse outside efforts to silence viewpoints that run counter to prevailing climate alarmism. My original piece follows below.- Craig Idso


The release of a United Nations (UN) climate change report last week energized various politicians and environmental activists, who issued a new round of calls to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Some of the most fiery language in this regard came from Sen. Barbara Boxer (D-CA), who called upon Congress to "wake up and do everything in its power to reduce dangerous carbon pollution," while Secretary of State John Kerry expressed similar sentiments in a State Department release, claiming that "unless we act dramatically and quickly, science tells us our climate and our way of life are literally in jeopardy."

Really? Is Earth's climate so fragile that both it and our way of life are in jeopardy because of rising carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions?

In a word, no! The human impact on global climate is small; and any warming that may occur as a result of anthropogenic CO2 and other greenhouse gas emissions is likely to have little effect on either Earth's climate or biosphere, according to the recently-released contrasting report Climate Change Reconsidered II: Biological Impacts, which was produced by the independent Nongovernmental International Panel on Climate Change (NIPCC).
Snowflake

Think the past winter was bad? Get ready for mini Ice Age

© Getty Images
Scientific speculation is intensifying that a new mini Ice Age is looming.

The last mini Ice Age struck the northern hemisphere about A.D. 1450 and lasted 400 years. It was dubbed the "Little Ice Age." In Canada, it had a huge impact on everything from crop yields to changing ecosystems.

"The Little Ice Age decreased the number of frost-free days and altered the composition of forests," report York University geographers Celina and Ian Campbell.

It was brought on by a seemingly minuscule average cooling of one to two degrees Celsius, climatologists report. But its impact was huge. Historians called it the "General Crisis" owing to its enormous impact: Crop harvests declined "disastrously."

Recent meteorological and other developments have prompted some researchers to predict another mini Ice Age is likely starting to take shape.
Cloud Grey

Mammatus clouds over Israel

Dry air under high, thick clouds formed uniquely shaped clouds all over the country during spring heatwave.
© Gilad Har Sheleg
Haifa covered with 'breast clouds'
Professor Hadas Saaroni, a climatologist from Tel Aviv University explained how these uniquely shaped clouds are formed.

"They get this shape when clouds are formed in an altitude of four kilometers. Under this higher layer of air there is air that is rather dry. When these clouds rain onto a dry layer, the rain instantly evaporates and the round shape of these clouds is formed.
Fish

Millions of dead fish found floating in Thondamanaru lagoon, Sri Lanka

A shoal of fish, may be a couple of million - our reporter lost count of it, were seen dead floating and lying in the shores of Thondamanaru and around the Barrage area located in the Valvetiturai Kankesanthurai Road.

Mysteriously all those dead fishes found in Thondamanaru Lagoon area were almost one kind which in Tamil called "Thirali," a typical edible small fish found solely in Palk Strait area.

These fishes were said to be dead and floating and were seen in heaps in the shore from last Thursday and Friday.

As the dead fishes started polluting the Selva Sannathi Temple area, Karaveddy Divisional Secretary K. Sivasri, Valvetiturai Urban Council Chairman N.Anandarajah and representatives of the Fisheries Societies visited the area and took measures to remove dead fishes.

Asian Tribune learnt the Sri Lankan Army personnel were also involved in the cleaning operation along with workers of Valvetitural and Valikamam East Pradesha Sabhas.

Three tractor loads of dead fishes were collected and taken and buried around the sea shores in Thondamanaru.

It remains mysterious why particularly Thirali fish only died.

According to an opinion, due to very warm atmospheric conditions prevailing these days, the sea water must have evaporated to a great leve and the water might have turned more brackish and fishes would not be able to bear up saltiness newly developed in the sea water.
Bizarro Earth

Abrupt lurch in Wyoming landslide splits house in two

© Tributary Environmental/AP Photo
A home damaged by a landslide Friday, April 18, 2014 in Jackson, Wyo. is shown in this aerial image provided by Tributary Environmental.
A rapid and sudden shift in a slow-moving landslide in Jackson, Wyo., has residents rattled and experts looking for answers.

The down-falling movement Friday created a fracture several feet deep in the ground beneath a house in the northwest Wyoming town in, causing it to split in two.

Workers who had been striving to stabilize the 100-feet-high hillside since early April, when town officials first noticed movement, were forced to suspend their efforts. Several other homes and businesses were also threatened by the abrupt land movement.

Officials began to notice significant land changes on April 4, and by the time the ground started shifting an inch a day by April 9, authorities were forced to evacuate 42 houses and apartments in the area.

On Friday, land shift had increased to a foot a day, with flutters of rocks and dirt continuing to stream steadily down the hill.
Bug

Insect population in Louisiana marshlands declining four years after BP oil spill

marshland oil
© Julie Dermansky
Weathered oil found coating the surface of the marsh in Bay Baptiste, Louisiana on April 9, 2014
Louisiana State University entomologist Linda Hooper-Bui has been studying the impact of the BP oil spill on insects and spiders for almost four years. She started her study shortly after the Macondo well blew out on April 20, 2010, before any oil washed up on shore. Her work documents the dwindling of the insect population in areas directly hit with the oil.

On April 9th, she returned to Bay Jimmy and Bay Baptiste, areas that were heavily impacted by the oil spill in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana.

"Insects are the basis of the food chain. They are like nature's Twinkies," Hooper-Bui says.

Her studies also monitor fish and birds, since they eat insects. She sweeps areas designated for her study by walking back and forth waving a net, catching whatever insects are present. She then empties the net into alcohol, preserving the insects for testing. She takes note of the wind speed and temperature at each location and collects a sample of sediment to be tested for hydrocarbons.
Snowflake Cold

Everest Avalanche Claims 13 lives, three still missing

mt. everest avalanche
© Associated Press/Kevin Frayer
In this Oct. 27, 2011 file photo, the last light of the day sets on Mount Everest as it rises behind Mount Nuptse as seen from Tengboche, in the Himalaya's Khumbu region, Nepal.
At least 13 are dead and three are still missing after an avalanche cascaded down a climbing route on Mount Everest early on Friday morning.

The death toll from the avalanche rose to 13 on Saturday after search teams recovered another body.

All of the deceased were Nepalese guides prepping ropes for climbers near Camp 2 on the mountain, according to the Associated Press.

Camp 2 is positioned at 21,000 feet, but the freezing level at the time of the avalanche was just above the base camp, AccuWeather.com Meteorologist Courtney Spamer said.

"With the freezing level below the avalanche point, it was still freezing where the avalanche occurred, so the surface warmth likely did not cause the avalanche in this case," Spamer said.

With the freezing level rising at this time of year, avalanches are more likely during this time period. However, at the time of the avalanche there was some fog in the area, but winds were calm.

"Usually what contributes to avalanches are unstable layers of snow, usually a bottom layer that has been melted some and then refrozen with a fresh snowpack coming on top of it," AccuWeather.com Western Weather Expert Ken Clark said. "Think of the bottom layer being like a teflon pan and the top layer your eggs."
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