Secret History


Ancient Civilizations? Check out these mysterious structures found on the bottom of the ocean floor

© The Truth Wins
In cultures all over the world, there are ancient stories about beautiful, prosperous cities that became submerged in the ocean and were never seen again. The most famous of these is the story of Atlantis, but there are many others. So could it be possible that some of these cities actually exist? In recent years, modern technology has allowed humanity to investigate the ocean floor like never before. As we have done so, we have made some incredible discoveries. You are about to see some amazing mysterious structures that have been found on the bottom of the ocean floor all over the world. Could these mysterious structures actually be evidence of very advanced ancient civilizations? As we learn about these ancient civilizations, will this knowledge turn the conventional version of human history that we all learned in school upside down?

We live at a time when mind blowing discoveries are being made at a pace never seen before. Just last month, I wrote about the megalithic ruins that have just been discovered in Russia that contain the largest blocks of stone ever found (even bigger than Baalbek).

Nobody can explain where those stones came from, who lived there, or how ancient humans could cut and move such massive blocks.

Well, similar things could be said about many of these mysterious structures on the bottom of the ocean floor...


Ancient caribou hunting site discovered beneath Lake Huron

© John O'Shea/University of Michigan
An acoustic image of the ancient caribou hunting site produced via a mosaic of scanning sonar images. (Light colored objects are stones that produce a strong acoustic signature while dark areas are acoustic shadows.)
An elaborate array of linear stone lanes and V-shaped structures has been discovered on an underwater ridge in Lake Huron, marking what is thought to be the most complex set of ancient hunting structures ever found beneath the Great Lakes, according to a new report.

Researchers based at the University of Michigan think the roughly 9,000-year-old-structure helped natives corral caribou herds migrating across what was then an exposed land-corridor - the so-called Alpena-Amberley Ridge - connecting northeast Michigan to southern Ontario. The area is now covered by 120 feet (347 meters) of water, but at the time, was exposed due to dry conditions of the last ice age.

Using underwater sonar and a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) equipped with a video camera, the researchers found two parallel lines of stones that create a 26-foot-wide (8 meters) and 98 foot-long (30 m) northwesterly-oriented lane that ends in a natural cul-de-sac. The team also found what appear to be V-shaped hunting blinds oriented to the southeast, and a rectangular area that may have been used as a meat cache, according to the researchers. The entire feature spans an area of about 92 feet by 330 feet (28 by 100 m), the team reports. [See Images of Ancient Hunting Structures Under Lake Huron]


How modern humans became weaklings compared with our ancient ancestors who could outrun and outlift today's top athletes


The study looked at skeletons dating back to around 5,300 BC with the most recent to 850 AD - a time span of 6,150 years. Pictured is an early Neolithic (approximately 4000 - 5000 BC) 35-40 year old male from Vedrovice, Czech Republic which was analysed as part of the research
* Human leg bones have grown weaker since farming was invented

* Scientists found bone structure declined after agriculture emerged

* Male farmers 7,300 years ago had legs of cross-country runners

* But just 3,000 years later, they had legs comparable to 'sedentary' students

Mo Farah would have had some tough competition from ancient farmers living 7,300 years ago.

Scientists claim if they were to cross paths, our ancestors would have been capable of outrunning some of the world's most talented athletes.

That's according to recent research by Cambridge University which reveals just how far our fitness has fallen in just a couple of millennia.


Breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans

© Göran Burenhult
This image shows osteologists Ove och Evy Persson at Ajvide, Gotland, Sweden, 1983. The skeleton from a young woman dated to 2700 BC.
An international team led by researchers at Uppsala University and Stockholm University reports a breakthrough on understanding the demographic history of Stone-Age humans. A genomic analysis of eleven Stone-Age human remains from Scandinavia revealed that expanding Stone-age farmers assimilated local hunter-gatherers and that the hunter-gatherers were historically in lower numbers than the farmers. The study is published today, ahead of print, in the journal Science.

The transition between a hunting-gathering lifestyle and a farming lifestyle has been debated for a century. As scientists learned to work with DNA from ancient human material, a complete new way to learn about the people in that period opened up. But even so, prehistoric population structure associated with the transition to an agricultural lifestyle in Europe remains poorly understood.

"For many of the most interesting questions, DNA-information from people today just doesn't cut it, the best way to learn about ancient history is to analyze direct data - despite the challenges," says Dr. Pontus Skoglund of Uppsala University, now at Harvard University, and one of the lead authors of the study.

"We have generated genomic data from the largest number of ancient individuals," says Dr. Helena Malmström of Uppsala University and one of the lead authors. "The eleven Stone-Age human remains were between 5,000 and 7,000 years old and associated with hunter-gatherer or farmer life-styles," says Helena Malmström.

Anders Götherström, who led the Stockholm University team, is satisfied with the amount of DNA that they could retrieve.

"Not only were we able to generate DNA from several individuals, but we did get a lot of it. In some cases we got the equivalent of draft genomes. A population genomic study on this level with a material of this age has never been done before as far as I know."


DNA evidence shows stone age hunter-gatherers shunned farming

© Göran Burenhult
Farmer or hunter-gatherer? Check her DNA
How did farming take over the world? One theory is that farming was such an evidently good idea that it spread on its own. As hunter-gatherers encountered farmers, they were converted to an agricultural way of living. But a large-scale genetic analysis of Stone Age remains in Sweden suggests that this wasn't the case.

Instead, it seems like early farmers and hunter-gatherers had deep-rooted genetic differences. This suggests that European farmers were so successful that they displaced hunter-gatherers as they spread across the continent.

Pontus Skoglund of Uppsala University in Sweden and his colleagues sequenced the DNA from 11 early hunter-gatherers and farmers dating back to between 5000 and 7000 years ago. Four were associated with late Stone Age farming settlements; seven were identified as coastal hunter-gatherers.

DNA analysis showed that the farmers and hunter-gatherers descended from distinct genetic lineages. "It is quite clear that the two groups are very different," says Skoglund. Comparisons with the genes of modern populations revealed them to be more distinct that the genomes of modern Scandinavians and Italians.

Previous analyses of the isotopes in the bones of the 11 Stone Age individuals also showed the hugely different diet the two groups had. The hunter-gatherers relied primarily on seals and fish, while the farmers ate mostly land protein - presumably from the animals that they took care of.


Humans may have left Africa earlier than thought according to some paleoanthropologists

© Katerina Harvati/University of Tübingen and Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment
Landmarks shown in one individual cranium.
A team of European researchers is suggesting that humans dispersed out of Africa in multiple waves, rather than in just one, and that it occurred much earlier than has been previously thought. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes how they built migration models based on gene flow and skull characteristics to predict human migration out of Africa.

Scientists have generally agreed that humans first migrated out of Africa 40,000 to 70,000 years ago, culminating in settlements that span the globe. That estimate has been rocked in recent years however, by discoveries of stone artifacts in the Arabian Desert that date back at least 100,000 years (close to the time that modern humans were thought to have arisen). In this new effort, the researchers have expanded on the idea that humans may have left Africa sooner than most had thought, and that it likely happened via multiple routes, rather than just one.

The models the team built took into account genetic dispersal and human skull shape - they created four possible model scenarios of migration - two that showed a single path out of Africa and two that showed multiple paths. The first of the single migration paths involved people traveling north along the Nile valley then turning right when they hit the Mediterranean Sea. The second involved people meandering along the Arabian Peninsula until making their way to Asia. The multi-path migration models involved people marching out of Africa along several paths, both north and south of the Arabian Peninsula.

Arrow Up

Winter storms slamming West coast of Ireland have so far revealed 7,000-year-old Mesolithic axes, early Christian burial ground, Medieval harbor, and 18th century village

© Failte Ireland
Irish archaeologist has called on the government to establish a ‘rescue unit’ after an axe washes up.
A prominent Irish archaeologist has called on the government to establish a 'rescue unit' after an axe aged 6,000 to 7,000 years old and other artefacts were washed up by the recent Atlantic seaboard storms.

Michael Gibbons wants the Irish state to immediately harvest the historical items unearthed by the New Year storms all along the Western coast.

He spoke as archaeologists identified yet more historic material thrown up by the storms according to the Irish Times newspaper.

These include a pink granite quern, or hand mill, estimated to be several thousand years old; several Mesolithic stone axes; a late medieval harbour; and early Christian burial grounds.


How we measure time: Why 60 minutes?

© Shutterstock
How did we come to divide the hour into 60 minutes and the minute into 60 seconds? These smaller divisions of time have been in practical use for only about 400 years, but they were vital to the advent of modern science.

For millennia, ancient civilizations looked to the sky to measure the big units of time. There's the year, which is the time it takes Earth to complete one orbit around the sun; the month, which is approximately how long it takes the moon to orbit our planet; the week, which is approximately the time between the four phases of the moon; and the day, which is the duration of one rotation of the Earth's on its axis.

Dividing the day was not so straightforward, though hours and minutes have their origins in traditions tracing back thousands of years.


Did lead poisoning bring down ancient Rome?

© Chris73/Creative Commons
When in ancient Rome, don't drink as the Romans do. High-born Romans sipped beverages cooked in lead vessels and channeled spring water into their homes through lead pipes (pictured). Some historians argue that lead poisoning plagued the Roman elite with diseases such as gout and hastened the empire's fall.

Now, a team of archaeologists and scientists has discovered just how contaminated Roman tap water was. The team dredged sediment downstream from Rome in the harbor basin at Portus, a maritime port of imperial Rome, and from a channel connecting the port to the Tiber River.

The researchers compared the lead isotopes in their sediment samples with those found in preserved Roman piping to create a historical record of lead pollution flowing from the Roman capital. Tap water from ancient Rome likely contained up to 100 times more lead than local spring water, the team reports online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. While the lead contamination was measureable, the team says the levels were unlikely high enough to be harmful, ruling out tap water as a major culprit in Rome's demise.

The team's thousand-year historical record included noticeable changes in lead pollution from Rome following major events such as the Gothic Wars in 535 C.E., Byzantine repairs to abandoned Roman aqueducts in 554 C.E., and the mid-9th century Arab sack of Rome. The team says this timeline can support historians studying the changing character of Rome and Portus during the turbulent post-empire years.


Black Death found to be Ebola-like virus

Nutritionally deficient foods, plus widespread cereal consumption, added to the overwhelming toxicity of our environment (heavy metals, fluoride, toxic additives in foods, etc), have prepared us as the perfect population for destruction by the return of the Black Death.
History textbooks have got it wrong about the Plague, also known as the Black Death, which they say was caused by bubonic plague spread by rats and their fleas. A new study suggests that it was in fact caused by an Ebola-like virus transmitted directly from person to person.

If the findings are correct it could mean that a modern form of the Black Death can emerge without requiring the unsanitary conditions of the Middle Ages. Generations of students have been taught that the plague bacteria transmitted by flea bites caused the depopulation of medieval Europe. The Plague first appeared in the 14th century and killed at least 25 million people - more than a quarter of the entire population - over a 300-year period. But two infectious disease specialists who have analyzed the Black Death have concluded that it bears a closer resemblance to modern outbreaks of the Ebola virus.

Intuitively, the Black Death has all the hallmarks of a viral disease rather than one caused by plague bacteria, says Christopher Duncan of the University of Liverpool. The history books are wrong, there's little doubt about that.

Comment: Don't miss our research in this topic: New Light on the Black Death: The Viral and Cosmic Connection

Worthy of keeping it in mind, in view of the recent Ebola-like outbreak...

Ebola suspected in Europe: "Broken through all containment efforts"

Continue to Part Two: The Hazard to Civilization From Fireballs and Comets

See also:

New Light on the Black Death: The Cosmic Connection

New Light on the Black Death: The Viral and Cosmic Connection


Happy New Year 2014?

SOTT Talk Radio show #70: Earth changes in an electric universe: Is climate change really man-made?