Health & Wellness
Map


Ambulance

Two more dead from Ebola outbreak in DR Congo

Congo
© AFP
A Doctors Without Borders nurse comforts a 43 year old patient
Two more people have died from an Ebola outbreak in central DR Congo, bringing the tally to 11 dead from the highly contagious but rare disease, Doctors Without Borders (MSF) said Sunday.

"This Sunday morning, a women with symptoms... of Ebola died," MSF spokesman Francois Dumont told AFP.

A man also died from Ebola on Thursday, he said.

Health Minister Augustin Mopipi said Thursday that the outbreak had killed nine and infected 21 since it was detected in November.
Health

Zambia: Mazabuka grapples with a Cholera out break

The Mazabuka District Disaster Management Committee (DDMC) has ordered the immediate closure of Ndeke Market and all taverns in Ndeke Township as a measure of controlling Cholera which broke out in the district four days ago.

The DDMC has also instructed Mazabuka Municipal Council and health authorities to ensure all the 57 shallow Wells where residents fetch water for drinking and other domestic chores are buried within 48 hours.

Mazabuka District Commissioner Tyson Hamaamba, who chaired an urgent DDMC meeting, also directed the council to immediately unblock the drainages in the township to allow water to flow.
Red Flag

Zimbabwe: Cholera epidemic is still 'out of control'

International aid agencies warned yesterday that Zimbabwe's humanitarian crisis was deepening, with a sharp rise in acute child malnutrition and a worsening cholera epidemic.

President Robert Mugabe's government has acknowledged the collapse of Zimbabwe's health system, but he also claimed earlier this month that the epidemic had been brought under control and that there was "no cholera" in the country.

Critics blame Mugabe's land reform policies for the collapse of Zimbabwe's farming sector and the ruin of what had been the region's breadbasket.
Attention

Common food additive found to increase risk and speed spread of lung cancer

New research in an animal model suggests that a diet high in inorganic phosphates, which are found in a variety of processed foods including meats, cheeses, beverages, and bakery products, might speed growth of lung cancer tumors and may even contribute to the development of those tumors in individuals predisposed to the disease.

The study also suggests that dietary regulation of inorganic phosphates may play an important role in lung cancer treatment. The research, using a mouse model, was conducted by Myung-Haing Cho, D.V.M., Ph.D., and his colleagues at Seoul National University, appears in the first issue for January of the American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine, published by the American Thoracic Society.

"Our study indicates that increased intake of inorganic phosphates strongly stimulates lung cancer development in mice, and suggests that dietary regulation of inorganic phosphates may be critical for lung cancer treatment as well as prevention," said Dr. Cho.
Pills

Are You Sure You're Not Psychotic Asks Shameless Drug Company?

If 100 million Americans have high cholesterol and only 8 million have schizophrenia or bipolar disorder, how can AstraZeneca's Seroquel not cholesterol pill Crestor be its second best selling pill?

Right after its number one pill, the Purple Performer Nexium?

Can anyone say disease mongering?

For years, AstraZeneca has tried to convince depressed people they are really bipolar and need to take the atypical antipsychotic Seroquel (quetiapine fumarate) which is only approved for schizophrenia or bipolar disorder.
Info

Researchers Revisit Male Bisexuality

seven-point Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale
© Kinsey Institute
The seven-point Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale, commonly known as the Kinsey Scale, is a tool to gauge a person's sexual orientation or experiences with both sexes.
The landmark "Sexual Behavior in the Human Male" report revealed major insights into bisexual behavior and orientation -- without even using the word "bisexual" -- when it was published 60 years ago by pioneering sex researcher Alfred Kinsey and his research team at Indiana University.

The iconic "Kinsey Report" unveiled the seven-point Heterosexual-Homosexual Rating Scale, commonly known as the Kinsey Scale, as a tool to gauge a person's sexual orientation or experiences with both sexes.

While the Kinsey Scale has become a fixture in sexuality textbooks and even popular culture, the rating system and Kinsey's findings regarding male bisexuality, and cultural influences on male sexuality in general, have largely been overlooked by today's sex researchers, according to an article in the December issue of the Journal of Bisexuality.
Cheeseburger

Nutritious Fast-food Kids' Meals Are Scarce, Researchers Find

© iStockphoto/Paul Hart
Only 3 percent of kids’ meals served at fast-food restaurants met federal dietary guidelines in the first study to examine the nutrient quality of such meals in a major U.S. metropolitan market.
Only 3 percent of kids' meals served at fast-food restaurants met federal dietary guidelines in the first study to examine the nutrient quality of such meals in a major U.S. metropolitan market.

Michigan State University's Sharon Hoerr, a food science and human nutrition researcher with the Michigan Agricultural Experiment Station, teamed up with economist Sharon O'Donnell and pediatrician Jason Mendoza from Baylor College of Medicine in Houston to assess the nutritional status of kids' meals in the Houston market.

The small percentage of meals that did meet dietary guidelines included fruit as a side dish and milk, and nearly all were deli-sandwich meals. They also had about one-third the fat, one-sixth the added sugars, twice the iron and three times the amount of vitamin A and calcium as did meals not meeting the criteria.

"This report is the first to characterize and compare the nutrient quality of all combinations of fast-food kids' meals in a major metropolitan market," Hoerr said. "Because 25 percent of children aged 4 to 8 years consume fast food on a typical day, the diet quality of kids' meals offered by fast-food companies contributes significantly to their overall health and well-being.
Heart

College Students Find Comfort In Their Pets During Hard Times

© iStockphoto/Sean Locke
Students who chose to live with at least one dog, one cat, or a combination of the two were less likely to report feeling lonely and depressed; something they directly attributed to their beloved pet.
A new study suggests that college students may handle stressful situations better if they have a pet.

Research has already shown that pets can improve the quality of life for people who are aging or those who are chronically ill. But researchers at Ohio State University recently found that many college students may also benefit from owning a cat or a dog.

A survey of students at a large university and other adults in the area found that nearly a quarter of college students surveyed believed their pets helped them get through difficult times in life. Students who chose to live with at least one dog, one cat, or a combination of the two were less likely to report feeling lonely and depressed; something they directly attributed to their beloved pet.
Health

We Are Better Able To Detect Racial Tension In Members Of Our Racial Group

In March of 2008, in a speech addressing contemporary racial tensions in America, then-Senator Barack Obama suggested that there is a "chasm of misunderstanding that exists between the races." Could this be true? Is it more difficult for members of different races to understand each others' emotions and intentions?

Psychologist Heather M. Gray from Boston University, along with Wendy Berry Mendes and Carrigan Denny-Brown of Harvard University, investigated whether the ability to detect a person's anxiety declines when perceptions are made across the racial divide.
Health

Chink Found In Armor Of Viral 'Tummy Bug'

Researchers at Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Melbourne have moved a step closer to identifying a broad spectrum treatment for the dreaded 'viral tummy bug' or rotavirus.

These highly-infectious viruses are the leading cause of severe diarrhoea in young children, responsible for thousands of hospitalisations in the developed world, and hundreds of thousands of deaths each year in developing countries.

Institute Executive Director Professor Mark von Itzstein said research findings published in the world-leading Chemical Biology journal Nature. Chemical Biology this week demanded a total rethink of how these viruses work.

"Rotaviruses are thought to infect the bodies by sticking to certain types of sugars called sialic acids on the surface of our stomach cells. They then enter cells and reproduce rapidly, causing illness," he said.
Top