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Snowflake Cold

Cold world, cooling sun: Global warming is dead on arrival

Hudson River
© Spencer Platt/Getty Images
Ice flows along the Hudson River in New York City on Feb. 20, 2015.
The cold crept in early on the 15th of Feb. 2015. By the 21st more than 100 million Americans were being impacted by the arctic blast known as the "Siberian Express" as record (low) temperatures were broken across the eastern third of the nation. Chicago experienced its coldest February since 1875. Last year it was the Polar Vortex and that took down GDP (Gross Domestic Product) quickly. This year the numbers are not in yet but we can expect economic activity to contract.

During this cold, more than 4,700 square miles of ice formed over the Great Lakes in just one night on the 17th. It was minus 41 in Minnesota at that time. "Great Lakes ice is now running ahead of last year and ice will increase with more brutal cold coming," says meteorologist Joe d'Aleo. "We are likely to have the most ice since records began."

Forbes Magazine is now equating global warming proponents with snake oil salesmen. There was never any manmade global warming."Global warming activists are in full-throttle damage control, desperately claiming global warming causes record snow and cold," says Forbes. "When global warming alarmists claim winters will become warmer and free of snow, yet their predictions are proven false for 20 years in a row, at some point logical people come to realize that global warming alarmists are selling snake oil."
Magic Wand

U.S. Climatology Lab and National Climatic Center hit new milestone in fake climate data

So far this year, more than 50% of USHCN data is fake, and NCDC is adjusting US temperatures upwards by more than one degree. New records for both.
© Steven Goddard
Ushcn.tavg.latest.FLs.52i.tar.gz
Ushcn.tavg.latest.raw.tar.gz

Monthly temperatures which are marked with an "E" are "estimated" rather than measured. More than half of the current data for 2015 is fake.
© Steven Goddard
As more data comes in, these numbers will go down some, but the point is that the more data is missing, the higher the temperature. This is likely due to to loss of rural data, and infilling with UHI contaminated urban data.

Comment: Ice age cometh: Brutal winters point to Earth turning colder

Cloud Lightning

Thundersnow or meteor event the cause of flashes in Arctic sky over Alaska?


Thundersnow
Facebook lit up almost as brightly as the sky over Kotzebue and other areas of the Arctic last Sunday morning, as people speculated about what the bright flashes in the sky were.

More than a dozen people reported seeing several bright flashes in the sky, unexplained by air traffic or other human activity. One thought neighborhood children were pulling a prank at first. Another suggested a meteor had split into three parts. Another reported hearing booms.

Then came a post showing a Chicago-based meteorologist on The Weather Channel standing in a blinding snowstorm with the sky flashing behind him. The ecstatic reporter hooted as he and his camera man captured "thundersnow" on camera several times in the course of a few minutes.

Though rare, thundersnow is a real phenomenon, a snow thunderstorm that occurs under circumstances similar to a thunderstorm as a cold or warm front moves into an area. The thunder is often muffled by the snow, but the flashes may still be visible.

"It's pretty rare, but it's not out of the question in the winter," said John Lingaas, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in Fairbanks. "The conditions have to be just right."

Comment: See also: Weatherman goes berserk over 'thundersnow' in Boston

Freak 'thundersnow' storm wreaks havoc on Toronto

Rare thundersnow in Dallas, Texas: 'How is this possible?'

Virginia, US: 'Thundersnow' behind mysterious blue flashes of light?

Arrow Down

Catastrophe-hopping Spiegel: German news magazine rolls out latest climate horror vision: A burning North Pole

This week's hard copy of Spiegel features the front cover story dubbed "Der verheizte Planet" - The heated planet - (see image below). Thus, Spiegel is returning and keeping to its long tradition of promoting end-of world scenarios.

The following image sequence shows how the burning planet is just the latest and newest climate catastrophe designed to get an apocalypse-weary public to worry (and to buy its magazines). So far the reaction, however, has been a big yawn. The world is, after all, full with other real concerns.
Climate
© Spiegel
Spiegel depictions over the last decades. 1986 and 2015 were even front cover images. 1974: cooling. 1986: sea level rise. Now, 2015: it’s a burning planet.
Ice Cube

'Slurpee' ice waves striking Nantucket beach


Slurpee wave
The Slurpee Waves of Nantucket is the latest exploit to emerge from the North East's desperately cold winter. The stories emerging from the onslaught of brutally cold weather onlookers have grown accustom to typically entail stories of overly taxed power grids, or record lows across the U.S. eastern seaborne. However, as of late there has been a new development in this year's frosty winter that has caught the internet's attention - Slurpee Waves.

The term "Slurpee Waves" was first coined by Boston's WBZ-TV chief meteorologist Eric Fisher according to the Bostonian CBS affiliate. The trending images themselves were captured by an area photographer named Jonathan Nimfroh. Since posting his Slurpee Wave photographs on February 25, the internet has been all abuzz about this rare natural oddity.
Ice Cube

King crab from Arctic waters found on Redcar beach, UK


King Crab on Redcar beach

Red king crab could be first on our shores, crustacean is usually found in icy waters like the Arctic

He's spent his working life beneath the sea but even oceanographer David McCreadie was baffled by a rare visitor to Redcar.

For the formidable-looking red crustacean found by David's fiancee Diane Weinoski looks for all the world like a king crab - and they hardly ever stray from considerably icier waters.

Members of the lithododid family, king crabs are large, tasty and usually found in seas MUCH colder than Redcar's.

And despite having worked and played in oceans across the world since the mid-1960s, David has never heard of one being found this far south.
Ice Cube

Deadly winter takes toll on waterfowl in Michigan

© Andrew Jowett / Times Herald
Ducks sit on a shelf of ice Monday along the St. Clair River in Port Huron.
Harsh weather is taking a toll on the waterfowl concentrated in the St. Clair River.

Terry McFadden, a wildlife biologist with the Michigan Department of Natural Resources, said waterfowl across the state are dying because of the extreme cold and growing ice cover.

Below-zero temperatures have caused rapid ice formation, blocking ducks from food sources in the water and sometimes trapping the birds in the ice.

"Most likely it's going to be similar to last year, we lost quite a few last year," McFadden said. "We don't have a really good estimate, but it was in the thousands."

McFadden said waterfowl, including long-tailed and canvasback ducks, are concentrated in the St. Clair River, where some of the region's only remaining open water is located.

That large concentration of birds depletes available resources as the ice forms.

Ice Cube

Massachusetts animal shelters report large numbers of suffering wildlife due to record cold weather

© John Tlumacki/Globe Staff
A screech owl sat on a perch mending a fractured wing at the New England Wildlife Center in Weymouth.
The casualty list is wide ranging: possums with frostbite, a turtle frozen in a block of ice, a swan hit by a plow, a fox hit by a car.

If this month's record cold and snowfall have taken a toll on human residents in Massachusetts, they have also wreaked havoc on the animal population, particularly wildlife. Animal shelters are beyond capacity with weather-related injuries.

"This is the worst winter that we've seen in terms of straight-up starving animals coming in," said veterinarian Maureen Murray, who practices and teaches at the Tufts University Wildlife Clinic in North Grafton. "With this historic amount of snow and extremely low temperatures, animals need more energy to stay warm, but they're not able to find food sources for that energy, so it's a really big strain on them."

Although it's difficult to determine whether wildlife populations have suffered permanent damage, local experts say it's clear the animals are under extreme stress.
Ice Cube

New York City waterways covered in ice floes


A tugboat tries to negotiate ice floes
The freezing temperatures that have plagued much of the eastern U.S. haven't spared New York City. The waterways around the island of Manhattan are filled with ice.

Binoculars

Arctic Gyrfalcon seen in the Chicago area

© Wikimedia Commons.
Gyrfalcon.
Chicago's hosting an extremely rare visitor which is good for bird watchers but tough on other birds, reports WBBM's John Cody.

Wildlife biologist Chris Anchor with Cook County Forest Preserve District says the same conditions that brought snowy owls to Chicago have also brought Chicago the biggest falcon in the world.

The Gyrfalcon has a wing span up to 4 and 1/2 feet and weighs three or four pounds. Anchor says they can kill other birds as large as ducks and geese.

He says the Gyrfalcon, spotted at Navy Pier and also in Barrington northwest of Chicago, has a maximum air speed of 120 miles an hour.

Anchor says this is only the fourth one he's seen in his 30-year career as a wildlife biologist.

Comment: See also: Rare Arctic gyrfalcon located in Ulster County, NY

Rare Arctic gyrfalcon found in Wells Harbor, Maine

Rare Arctic gyrfalcon seen in Madbury, New Hampshire

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