NEW! Book available now on Amazon

The Cassiopaea Experiment Transcripts 1994 (Volume 1)

by Laura Knight-Jadczyk

The Cassiopaea Experiment is unique in the history of channeling, mediumship, and parapsychology. For years prior to the first Cassiopaean transmission, Laura Knight-Jadczyk went to great lengths to study the channeling phenomenon, including its history, its inherent strengths, weaknesses, dangers, and the various theories and methods developed in the past. After having exhausted the standard literature in search of answers to the fundamental problems of humanity, Laura and her colleagues (including her husband, mathematical physicist Arkadiusz Jadczyk) have held regular sittings for more than twenty years.

For the first time in print, this volume includes complete transcripts of 36 experimental sessions conducted in 1994. Questions and answers have been annotated extensively, giving unprecedented insight into the background and interpersonal dynamics of the early Cassiopaea Experiment. The sessions of this year introduced many of the themes that would recur in more detail over the next twenty years, including such topics as cyclical cometary bombardment of the Earth, the solar companion hypothesis, ancient history, metaphysics, the hyperdimensional nature of reality, and the possibility of evolution of humanity.

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Science of the Spirit
Map


Compass

War: The social consequence of child abuse

© PCADV.org
Since adolescence I have always wondered why people take pleasure in humiliating others. Clearly the fact that some people are sensitive to the suffering of others proves that the destructive urge is not a universal aspect of human nature. So why do some tend to solve their problems by violence while others don't?

Philosophy failed to answer my question, and the Freudian theory of the death wish has never convinced me. It was only by closely examining the childhood histories of murderers, especially mass murderers, that I began to comprehend the roots of good and evil: not in the genes, as commonly believed, but often in the earliest days of life. Today, it is inconceivable to me that a child who comes into the world among attentive, loving and protective parents could become a predatory monster. And in the childhood of the murderers who later became dictators, I have always found a nightmarish horror, a record of continual lies and humiliation, which upon the attainment of adulthood, impelled them to acts of merciless revenge on society. These vengeful acts were always garbed in hypocritical ideologies, purporting that the dictator's exclusive and overriding wish was the happiness of his people. In this way, he unconsciously emulated his own parents who, in earlier days, had also insisted that their blows were inflicted on the child for his own good. This belief was extremely widespread a century ago, particularly in Germany.
Hourglass

Top five regrets of the dying

regrets of the dying
© Montgomery Martin/Alamy
A palliative nurse has recorded the top five regrets of the dying.
A nurse has recorded the most common regrets of the dying, and among the top ones is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'. What would your biggest regret be if this was your last day of life?

There was no mention of more sex or bungee jumps. A palliative nurse who has counselled the dying in their last days has revealed the most common regrets we have at the end of our lives. And among the top, from men in particular, is 'I wish I hadn't worked so hard'.

Bronnie Ware is an Australian nurse who spent several years working in palliative care, caring for patients in the last 12 weeks of their lives. She recorded their dying epiphanies in a blog called Inspiration and Chai, which gathered so much attention that she put her observations into a book called The Top Five Regrets of the Dying.

Ware writes of the phenomenal clarity of vision that people gain at the end of their lives, and how we might learn from their wisdom. "When questioned about any regrets they had or anything they would do differently," she says, "common themes surfaced again and again."

Here are the top five regrets of the dying, as witnessed by Ware:

Comment: Read Gabor Maté's When the Body Says No, for a thorough understanding on the societal and familial programming that prevents us from living authentic lives, and how we can learn to be true to ourselves and the people close to our hearts.

Life Preserver

Behavioural training reduces inflammation

Research subjects suppress immune responses using physical conditioning.

The effectiveness of meditation and other techniques helps explicate links between the immune and nervous systems.
Dutch celebrity daredevil Wim Hof has endured lengthy ice-water baths, hiked to the top of Mount Kilimanjaro in shorts and made his mark in Guinness World Records with his ability to withstand cold. Now he has made a mark on science as well.

Researchers have used Hof's methods of mental and physical conditioning to train 12 volunteers to fend off inflammation.

The results, published today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences1, suggest that people can learn to modulate their immune responses - a finding that has raised hopes for patients who have chronic inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease.

Comment: Just do one session of Éiriú Eolas and you'll find out the impact of breathing exercises on our behavior and physiology: eebreathe.com

See also When the Body Says No: Caring for ourselves while caring for others - Dr. Gabor Maté

Telephone

You don't always know what you're saying

People's conscious awareness of their speech often comes after they've spoken, not before.
© Ikon Images / Alamy
If you think you know what you just said, think again. People can be tricked into believing they have just said something they did not, researchers report this week.

The dominant model of how speech works is that it is planned in advance - speakers begin with a conscious idea of exactly what they are going to say. But some researchers think that speech is not entirely planned, and that people know what they are saying in part through hearing themselves speak.

So cognitive scientist Andreas Lind and his colleagues at Lund University in Sweden wanted to see what would happen if someone said one word, but heard themselves saying another. "If we use auditory feedback to compare what we say with a well-specified intention, then any mismatch should be quickly detected," he says. "But if the feedback is instead a powerful factor in a dynamic, interpretative process, then the manipulation could go undetected."
Bulb

What happens to your cells when you experience happiness?

Too much research has been devoted to the science of stress, depression and the connection to disease and not enough to the biology of joy. If a greater emphasis was placed on why we don't go to doctors when we are feeling optimistic, happy, and joyful, there would be less value and importance placed on the emotional states that coincidentally generate more money for those manufacturing medication. There are many ways to experience pleasure in our brains and happiness might be the one emotion that prevents and reverses the cascade of cellular events that lead to disease.
brain
© unknown
Artificial Happiness

A lot of people get addicted to chemicals - alcohol, cocaine, amphetamine, heroin, and nicotine. Why do they do that, and why aren't they happy? It is because brains have a variety of chemical systems that regulate their electrical activities in waking and sleeping, and the addictive drugs artificially stimulate those systems, but the feelings are not those of joy.
Family

How big-hearted babies become selfish monsters - Our natural instinct for altruism is being destroyed by the demands of modern life

© Jamie Grill/Getty
A baby being fed a homemade meal will need half as much as being weaned on ready-made food.
If you've been planning a shopping trip with the kids for bank holiday Monday, you might not want to read any further, because teaching your children consumerism is helping to turn them into selfish, immoral creatures without a streak of empathy, according to a new study. You may be making them just like stressed-out adults, whose potential as human beings is killed off as genuine altruism is suffocated by their greed and anxiety.

In a new book which suggests that social changes and the shift towards an ever more unequal society are making us cold-hearted and mean, psychotherapist Graham Music says we're more likely to be born big-hearted and kind but then pushed towards being selfish and cold than the other way around.

"We're losing empathy and compassion in dealing with other people in our society," said Music, a consultant child and adolescent psychotherapist at the Tavistock and Portman clinics in London. "There is a lot of evidence that the speed of life and the resultant anxiety have an enormous impact on how we deal with other people. We all know it anecdotally. You live in a dog-eat-dog world and it makes sense to be highly stressed and vigilant to cope with it. From that stress come some really fundamental shifts in behaviour, along with pretty poor outcomes in everything from health to life expectancy and happiness."
Footprints

The slow death of the art of purposeless walking

A number of recent books have lauded the connection between walking - just for its own sake - and thinking. But are people losing their love of the purposeless walk?

Walking is a luxury in the West. Very few people, particularly in cities, are obliged to do much of it at all. Cars, bicycles, buses, trams, and trains all beckon.

Instead, walking for any distance is usually a planned leisure activity. Or a health aid. Something to help people lose weight. Or keep their fitness. But there's something else people get from choosing to walk. A place to think.

Wordsworth was a walker. His work is inextricably bound up with tramping in the Lake District. Drinking in the stark beauty. Getting lost in his thoughts.
Ambulance

SOTT Talk Radio #64 - The 'Wetiko Virus' and Collective Psychosis: Interview With Paul Levy

wetiko
Born in 1956, Paul Levy graduated with degrees in art and economics and has had a lifelong intense interest in the work of C. G. Jung. As a result of an intense personal trauma in 1981, he began a process of spiritual awakening that led him on a 'shamanic descent' and a quest to understand the fundamental nature of reality.

Paul is the author of: The Madness of George Bush: A Reflection of Our Collective Psychosis and Dispelling Wetiko: Breaking the Curse of Evil

In his books Paul explores and explains that we 'disown' our innermost, drarkest thoughts and feelings and project them outwards onto others and the world, a process he compares to the Native American Indian concept of "wetiko". Paul has stated that "there is a contagious psychospiritual disease of the soul, a parasite of the mind, that is currently being acted out en masse on the world stage via a collective psychosis of titanic proportions. This mind-virus covertly operates through the unconscious blind spots in the human psyche, rendering people oblivious to their own madness and compelling them to act against their own best interests."


Here's the transcript:
Eye 2

Conservatives, evil and psychopathy: Is there a link?

conservative psychopaths
© Associated Press/Chris Carlson/J. Scott Applewhite/Mark J. Terrill/Fox News/Salon
Rush Limbaugh, Ted Cruz, Donald Sterling, Sean Hannity
You knew it was true. Now research proves it! The real motivation behind Rush, Sterling and defenses of awfulness

Let's start with what I said about Limbaugh simply being a good conservative when he rushed to Sterling's defense. That's not just a liberal canard. It's not just me trying to do to Limbaugh what Limbaugh does to liberals. It's what conservatives themselves have said repeatedly over the years. The defense of hierarchy is what conservatism is all about, as Corey Robin reminded us all with his recent book, The Reactionary Mind.

What's more, the differences between how liberals and conservatives think are reflected in a range of divergent cognitive processes, as summarized in a 2003 paper by John T. Jost and three co-authors, Political Conservatism as Motivated Social Cognition that brought together findings drawn from 88 study samples in 12 countries:,
"The core ideology of conservatism stresses resistance to change and justification of inequality and is motivated by needs that vary situationally and dispositionally to manage uncertainty and threat," Jost and his co-authors wrote in the abstract. These are not merely American phenomena, nor is there any reason to think they're particularly modern.
While Jost's paper revealed a complicated array of different factors involved, two in particular have been shown to explain the lion's share of intergroup prejudice: right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) and social dominance orientation (SDO). John Dean's book Conservatives Without Conscience focused on the combined workings of these two factors. While there is some overlap between the two, RWA is more predominant among followers, who would probably make up the main bulk of Limbaugh's audience, while SDO is more prominent in folks like Sterling.

SDO represents a generalized tendency to support groups' dominance, whether the groups are defined biologically (men over women, the old over the young) or culturally (race, ethnicity, religion, etc.).
2 + 2 = 4

Is stress contagious? Scientists say 'yes'

© Reuters/Marcelo del Pozo
Merely observing another person in a stressful situation - even on television - can be enough to make our bodies release the stress hormone cortisol, causing us to be stressed ourselves, a team of German scientists has found.

The study was conducted by scientists from the Max Planck Institute for Cognitive and Brain Sciences in Leipzig and Technische Universitat in Dresden, Germany.

Stressful situations were observed through a one-way mirror, but in some cases, even looking at a stressed stranger on a video was enough to put some people on edge. The research notes that in a society where stress is everywhere, emphatic stress is a phenomenon that cannot be ignored.

Comment: Stress is a part of everyone's life. One excellent way to help alleviate it is with the Eiriu Eolas meditation program. It instantly relaxes and rejuvenates!

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