© Medical Daily
Australian researchers have invented a device that can reset the body's clock and help people get a proper sleep even after a flying to a different time zone.

The device called Re-Timer works by stimulating the part of brain that regulates 24-hour sleep cycle in the body.

The device has been developed and launched by sleep researchers at Flinders University, Australia.

"Body clocks or circadian rhythms influence the timing of all our sleeping and waking patterns, alertness, performance levels and metabolism," said Psychologist Professor Leon Lack from Flinders University.

People who wish to reset their body clocks to fit their sleep schedule must prepare in advance. The device must be used three days for 50 minutes each day. To advance body clock, the user must wear the device after awakening in the morning while wearing it before bed time delays the body clock.

Apart from frequent flyers that can reset the body's clock according to the time zone, the device can also be used by people working in rotational shifts or those who have trouble falling asleep during winters.

"Photoreceptors in our eyes detect sunlight, signal our brain to be awake and alert, and set our rhythms accordingly. These rhythms vary regularly over a 24-hour cycle. However, this process is often impaired by staying indoors, traveling to other times zones, working irregular hours, or a lack of sunlight during winter months," said Lack.

Previous research has shown that not getting enough sleep stresses the body so much that it kicks off a reaction that it normally does to fight an infection.

"Our extensive research studies have shown that green light is one of the most effective wavelengths for advancing or delaying the body clock, and to date is the only wearable device using green light," Lack added, according to a news release.

"This successful collaboration is evidence of what can be done when our manufacturing companies link with major research institutions for commercial outcomes," said Tom Koutsantonis, South Australia's Minister for Manufacturing, Innovation and Trade.