Welcome to Sott.net
Sun, 25 Sep 2022
The World for People who Think

Fireballs

Fireball 3

Meteor over Canada caught on video


An Okanagan farmer who regularly takes photos of the sunrise captured a whole lot more this week when she spotted a meteor in the sky. Janette Casey Ewens, who owns Labyrinth Farms north of Kamloops, was in the barn yard at 6 a.m. on Monday when she saw a "thing" falling from above, she told The Huffington Post B.C.

"I ran back up to the house and grabbed my camera and snapped a few pics then hit the record button," she said in an email. "It happened twice a few minutes apart. The second time it happened faster."

The American Meteor Society received three reports of a fireball being spotted from West Kelowna, Cranbrook, and Three Hills in Alberta. Joanne Rosvick, an astronomer and associate professor at Thompson Rivers University, said it was likely space debris that perhaps came from a satellite, reported CFJC.

Fireball 4

Meteor lights up Utah's early morning sky

Image
© File photo
Rodger Fry had just picked up his morning newspaper, when he looked up at the constellation Orion - and saw something most unexpected. At about 4:32 a.m., the president of the Salt Lake Astronomical Society saw a green fireball soaring through the Thursday morning sky. Several others Fry talked to later saw the same thing.

"There was no sonic boom but it was quite large," said Fry, who lives near 5900 S. 800 West in Murray. "It looked like [the meteor] was ... a little smaller than the sun."

That silence tells experts like Fry that the meteor that lit up Utah's skies was likely far, far away from us. Patrick Wiggins, the NASA/JPL solar system ambassador to Utah, hasn't spoken to anyone who heard any sonic boom associated with the meteor.

Comment: See video footage below. Notice how the fireball just 'goes out' after the first flash. Fascinating!


A second video can be viewed here.


Fireball 2

Meteor caught on Russian dash cam

Meteor
© Screen Capture
Thanks to the ubiquitousness of dashboard-mounted video cameras in Russia yet another bright object has been spotted lighting up the sky over Siberia, this time a "meteor-like object" seen on the evening of Saturday, Sept. 27.

The video above, shared today by RT.com, shows the object as it streaked toward the western horizon over the Kemerovo region of Siberia. Even through the glare of streetlights and oncoming car headlights it could easily be seen... as to exactly what it was, that's not yet known.

Fireball 5

Meteor strikes may not be random

Meteor
© NASA
Scientists have found that meteor impacts are not random events but may occur as Earth passes through streams of meteoroids.
Meteor impacts are far less random than most scientists assumed, according to a new analysis of Earth-strike meteors.

The research, reported on the pre-press astrophysics website ArXiv.org, concluded that meteor impacts are more likely to occur at certain times of the year when Earth's orbit takes us through streams of meteoroids.

The majority of meteors analysed hit the Earth in the second half of the year, say the researchers, brothers Carlos and Raúl de la Fuente Marcos of the Complutense University of Madrid.

"This lack of randomness is induced by planetary perturbations, in particular Jupiter's, and suggests that some of the recent, most powerful Earth impacts may be associated with resonant groups of Near Earth Objects and/or very young meteoroid streams," they report.

Meteoroid streams can be generated by the break-up of an asteroid or comet.

A planet or moon can also affect nearby asteroids and meteors, herding them into loose orbits called 'resonant streams', which can be broken up by big planets such as Jupiter and Saturn.

The study is based on 33 meteor impact events detected between 2000 and 2013 by infrasound acoustic pressure sensors, operated by the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty Organization.

The sensors are designed to detect clandestine nuclear tests, but also pick up meteor impacts with an explosive energy in excess of a thousand tonnes of TNT.

Fireball 5

Fireball spotted above the Carolinas

Fireball
© Joel Rydel/Facebook Screengrab
Charlotte, N.C. -- Dozens of fireball sightings were reported across the Carolinas and Virginia overnight.

According to the American Meteor Society's website, people in Charlotte, Mint Hill and Lancaster were among those who spotted the streaks in the sky. Reports came in around 11:15 Friday night and 3:15 Saturday morning. Twenty-nine reports were made in total.

One man in Virginia Beach captured the light on camera. Jim Rydel's video doesn't directly capture the meteors but shows the flashes in the sky. Some say it appears like more and more fireballs are passing over us but NBC Charlotte's Brad Panovich says it's likely just social media. People can make reports more easily and more often nowadays.

Brad encourages anyone who saw the fireballs to make their report here.

Fireball 3

Four large fireballs reported over USA

AMS Fireball Reports
© AMS
The American Meteor Society (AMS) says four large, unique fireball events were reported Tuesday night.

AMS stated three of the events all occurred within an hour and a half of each other--- a rare happening. The AMS concluded each event was unique, due to the analysis of time, proximity of witnesses and pointing data gathered. It's likely several were captured by NASA, said AMS.

Locations of the events were reported all the way from Florida to Michigan.

Anyone who witnessed the fireball can report the event to the AMS on their website.

Comment: SOTT's fireball heat map for the past year:




Fireball 2

Fireball streaked across Mid-Atlantic sky Sunday evening

Image

This disintegration of this bright fireball lit up the sky of New Jersey, New York and Pennsylvania on September 2014
If you saw a bright object race across sky around 11 p.m. Sunday, you're not alone.

Social media exploded with reports of a fireball streaking across the sky.

A fireball is another term for a very bright meteor, according to the American Meteor Society (AMS).

"Incredibly bright #meteor even at apparently low altitude just fell over #DC. Wonderful moment!" tweeted photojournalist William B. Plowman from Washington, D.C.

Comment: More footage of same.




Fireball 5

Meteor streaks across Vancouver skies

A fireball mesmerized people in parts of B.C., Washington and Oregon on Saturday night.

Jen Pickard was fortunate enough to snap a photo of the tail end of what's believed to be a meteor. She and her friend were paddling in Qualicum Beach on Vancouver Island after watching the sun set, when a "huge ball of fire flew by" at about 8:20 p.m.

"It was yellowish blue and flew in an arc," Pickard wrote in an email to The Huffington Post B.C. She described the 45-second streak like a shooting star but much larger and closer.
Vancouver Meteor_1
© Jen Pickard/Ruth Stefanek

Fireball 2

Incredible video of comet fragment passing over California

Image
© Unknown
The following video is from Time To Wake Up News facebook page, the original video of the fireball was posted by Landon Miller who works at KTVN TV and can be found here.

Video of 'fireball' witnessed over California! 9/12/2014 @ 6am Pacific.


Comment: See also: Thousands of people in California lose power after truck crash and meteor flash


Comet 2

Large fireball observed over Colorado

Image
© Reuters / Doug Murray
A Perseid meteor streaks towards the horizon during the annual Persied meteor shower in Palm Beach Gardens, Florida, August 12, 2008. Perseids meteors are bits of debris left by the comet Swift-Tuttle which burn up in the Earth's atmosphere.
On Tuesday, Sep. 2, a lot of people in Colorado said they saw a fireball streak across the sky at about 10.30 p.m.

Director of the Sommers-Bausch Observatory at the University of Colorado, Seth Hornstein, said that the bright ones were rare and they see only three or so of them that get significantly brighter every year.

A man sent an email to 9news stating that he and several members of his family had seen the fireball from their home. Reports on sightings can be done on the website of the American Meteor Society and these reports showed that the family wasn't the only one.

The website shows that people from eighteen different cities near Colorado like Fountain, Evergreen, Boulder, Pueblo, Estes Park Littleton, Aurora and Arvada had also seen the meteor.

Hornstein said that the meteor was approximately the size of a sports ball, either a baseball or a volleyball. Though that doesn't seem like it is too big, he explained that usually the size of the fireball would be the size of a pebble or a grain of sand.