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Fireballs

Fireball 5

Loud boom that shook the Brainerd lakes area, Minnesota seems consistent with meteor event

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Still from security camera footage of the fireball meteor seen across the Midwest last Friday 27 December, 2013.
Residents in the Brainerd lakes area reported seeing flashes of light streaking across the sky and hearing a boom that rattled homes and buildings, and meteorologists say the reports are consistent with a meteor event.

The reports started flowing in to authorities on Friday between 9:30 p.m. and 10:30 p.m., the Brainerd Dispatch reported. Some residents said they saw a turquoise streak light up the sky, and others say a bright light illuminated their homes, even darkened rooms where the drapes were closed.

There's been no confirmation of a meteor, said Kevin Kraujalis, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service. However, the reports seem consistent with what happens when a meteor enters the atmosphere, he said.

"There's no other explanation," Kraujalis said. He added that there were reports of meteor sightings the previous night in southern Minnesota and northern Iowa.

It's possible there will never be confirmation. If there were a meteor, it may have burned up completely in the atmosphere. If it broke into pieces, the fragments might never be found, particular since the sightings occurred in a rural area that's not densely populated.

Fireball

Chelyabinsk meteor hit the Earth like a warning shot fired from space

russian meteor
© AP
The meteorite fireball that fell over Chelyabinsk briefly burned 30 times brighter than the sun.
The meteorite is providing invaluable information to help protect against larger rocks that might pose a serious threat to Earth

Just after sunrise on 15 February 2013, as commuters made their way along snow-covered roads to Chelyabinsk in south-west Russia, the clear blue sky was torn by a hurtling lump of space rock.

The meteorite appeared without warning, out of the sun, on a shallow trajectory. It thumped into the atmosphere at 12 miles per second and became a fireball. For a moment, the rock burned 30 times brighter than the sun.

Viktor Grokhovsky, a researcher at Ural Federal University, 200km to the north of Chelyabinsk, missed the beautiful, terrifying spectacle that morning, but within minutes was watching video of the event. He spent the rest of the day assembling a search party. The first of several set out at first light the next morning to interview eyewitnesses and recover pieces of the fallen rock.

"It was rather easy to find fragments in the first days after the meteorite fell, because the chunks left holes in the snow," Grokhovsky told the Guardian. But as more snow fell over the next two weeks, the holes became covered over. The search was called off until the snow began to melt in the spring.

Comment: Celestial Intentions: Comets and the Horns of Moses
Killer Space Rocks
2012 saw record number of meteorite falls so far this century

SOTT readers would be well advised to check out just how 'rare' these celestial occurrences actually are these days. Not as 'rare' as the 'experts' want you to believe.

SOTT diligently tracks sightings and impacts here:
Fire in the Sky


Fireball 3

Second large meteor fireball exploded over Portland, Oregon in one month, 23 November 2013

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© Marty Schnelle
A strange, fiery sight spotted in the skies over the Willamette Valley Wednesday morning caused quite the buzz, with initial reports suggesting perhaps a meteor or burning space junk.

Jim Todd, Planetarium Manager at the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry says original photos suggested to him it might have been a meteor fireball, but he has since seen additional photos that suggest it was instead a jet contrail that created an optical illusion by reflecting light from the rising sun.

A number of residents snapped photos of the scene, and KATU photojournalist Mike Warner also took a short video of the trail while he was flying in their station's helicopter. He said he and the helicopter pilot were over Interstate 205 at the Clackamas Town Center between 6:30 a.m. and 7 a.m. and spotted the odd sight while looking east.

According to U.S. Strategic Command, no man-made objects reentered the atmosphere in our area on Wednesday, which excluded the possibility that some space junk fell to earth.

Comment: See also: Fireball seen over Portland, Oregon, 30 October 2013


Fireball 5

Increased levels of 'meteor-smoke' in upper atmosphere sees noctilucent clouds cover whole of Antarctica

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NASA reports that rare, electric blue noctilucent clouds have reappeared over the South Pole, where the clouds are often spotted for five to ten days every year. NASA calls the clouds "a great geophysical light bulb" that are visible during the darkest nights.

The clouds were spotted by NASA's AIM spacecraft, which observed a "vast bank" of the clouds that began on November 20 and has expanded to blanket the entire continent, creating a rippling mass of particles that represent the highest clouds formed on earth. The clouds "glow" because of their altitude - they reflect light cast from a horizon we can't see from the ground. But what causes these clouds to form so high above the surface of the earth?

Last year, atmospheric scientists from Hampton University published a study revealing the discovery of "meteor smoke" in the clouds. When meteors get pulverized in the atmosphere, they leave behind a trail of tiny bits floating in the upper reaches of the atmosphere. It turns out that these microscopic "meteor clouds" provide the building blocks for noctilucent clouds - water molecules gather on the specs of dust, creating ice crystals.


Comment: NASA is blowing more 'meteor-smoke' in our eyes!

After acknowledging that NLCs are increasing due to the increased extraterrestrial factor, NASA then tries to blame rising methane levels from below, suggesting that human industrial activity is responsible for both.

This is a rather pathetic attempt to blame NLCs on 'man-made global warming'!

Rising methane levels are due to methane being released from deep under the oceans.

Increased NLCs are a 'canary in a coal mine' alright, but not in the way Official Science would have us believe.

Since Official Science won't spell it out for people, it's left to citizen observers to do so:

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© SOTT.net



Fireball 3

Daytime fireball photographed over Western Montana, 27 December 2013

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© Chystene Garagliano
Missoula - It came from the sky, and the burning question is, what was it? Reporter Jacqueline Quynh took a look at the reported fireball that some saw Friday morning in Western Montana.

We got the above photo from Chystene Garagliano from Stevensville, who snapped the picture around 9:30 a.m. Friday morning. Some folks said it looked like a big green meteor.

"From what you showed me, it's probably not aliens," Western Montana Astronomical Society President Nicholos Wethington observed.

We showed photos of the object to Wethington at the SpectrUM Discovery Center. He heads a group of people who share info from observations in the sky.

Comment: Note that this was a separate event to the other large meteor fireball that exploded over Minnesota and Iowa in the evening of 27 December 2013:

Another massive fireball meteor fragments over U.S., seen this time from Minnesota and Indianapolis, 27 December 2013


Evil Rays

Mystery of the 1978 Bell Island Boom: Ball lightning, melted power lines and other weird electrical stuff in Newfoundland

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An artist's impression of the ball lightning seen by many local residents on Bell Island, Newfoundland in 1978
Was it ball lightning, an overhead meteor explosion or a test of a top secret electromagnetic weapon of some kind? What caused the explosive phenomenon on Bell Island, Newfoundland in 1978 that electrocuted livestock, melted power lines, and produced floating orbs of fire? Enough energy was released that day to set off the American nuclear test watch satellites, and weapons researchers from the Los Alamos National Laboratory soon showed up at the site. CBC Reporter, Rick Seaward, was at the scene in 1978. He investigates the mysterious phenomenon and the shadowy events that followed in this broadcast from the following year.

Part 1


Comment: See also:

Ball lightning strikes twice in southern Russia?

Signs Supplement: Fortean Fire


Fireball 5

Another massive fireball meteor fragments over U.S., seen this time from Minnesota and Indianapolis, 27 December 2013

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© LunarMeteoriteHunter / Google Earth
Minnesota, Indianapolis fireball meteor, approx. 22:30 CST, 27 Dec. 2013
Initial Meteor Sighting Reports

27 Dec. 2013 - Tiffany, Stillwater, Minnesota, USA 20:33:00
4 secs duration. West sky, shot straight down. No sound, bright light with orange and blue and green bursts. Less bright than sun, slightly. It seemed so close, like it could have been a firework a neighborhood over, but it was no firework. It shot straight down fast out of the sky. Seemed so close.
27 Dec. 2013 - Jessica, Tintah, MN, USA 2230 CST
5 secs duration. S-N. Blue, very bright, brighter than the moon. Lit up the car. Largest/brightest I've seen!

Fireball 4

Large meteor event reported over Michigan, Iowa, Missouri, South Dakota, Illinois, Minnesota, Kansas, North Dakota, Ontario 26DEC2013

Seen in at least 10 states! US and Canada! Likely MORE! Updates pending - Now 75 Reports! TWO Videos!

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Fireball 4

Amateur video of Iowa fireball streaking across the sky breaking into 3 pieces

An amateur meteor spotter caught the moment when a fireball flew across Iowa's sky Thursday evening. Tim Cline says he has two cameras pointing at the sky at his Williamson observatory. He says the footage shows a meteor flying north towards Des Moines. Consistent with witness reports, the timestamp puts the bright object flying by at 5:41 p.m.

Channel 13 received several reports of a colorful fireball across the metro and even on the Iowa/Missouri border.

The National Weather Service said they also caught some footage of it. They later backtracked saying the moving object in their video was more likely Venus.

The evening sky was well described by our viewers. Mercedes Sholley posted on the Channel 13 Facebook page, "I watched it change colors from the yellow red and orange to green blue and purple right before it sizzled out and went black and I watched it break off into at least 3 pieces."

Jakob Kranovich also described it, "I literally drove right underneath it. It looked like a giant firework going sideways. It gave off a bright green glowing color (I'm dead serious) and broke up and sparks showered everywhere and faded out. Happened too fast to get a picture and I was driving as well."

"It was awesome. Unfortunately no pics but I don't think I'll get that image out of my mind," Jamie Croatt commented.

Schoolnet8 camera

Fireball 3

Possible meteor reported this evening over central Iowa


It probably wasn't Superman who drew central Iowans' eyes to the sky Thursday evening. A meteor is the more likely explanation for the streak of light that reportedly lasted just a few seconds.

The National Weather Service was able to catch a ball of light on one of its cameras in Iowa City, but thinks its footage may show the planet Venus, which was also visible around the same time.

Kurt Kotenberg of the NWS said the agency has received accounts of people seeing a "fireball."

"We're looking at the reports, also," Kotenberg said. "The interesting thing's about it, Venus was visible in the sky just after sunset."

Social media posts from Iowans claiming to have seen the potential meteor indicate it appeared over central Iowa skies about 5:40 p.m., although it seems few eyewitnesses had a camera ready.