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Mon, 18 Nov 2019
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Mystery boom shakes residents of Sharon, Pennsylvania

Mercer County - Memorial Day weekend started out "relatively quiet" for police, except for another mysterious "sonic boom."

At 7:29 p.m. Friday, the explosion rocked Shenango Township. A resident in the 3500 block of Hubbard-West Middlesex Road heard "a loud sonic boom," a Mercer County 911 dispatcher said. The caller told the 911 operator "it shook the house; it was not like a transformer blew.

"All of the neighbors came outside to see what happened, so many people felt it."

Southwest Mercer County Regional police were dispatched, but could not find anything.

It was the second such incident reported in as many weeks. On May 13, dozens of callers from Mercer to Sandy Lake to Grove City reported hearing a "massive explosion" at about 9 p.m. Officials have not been able to explain the noise.

The 911 dispatcher said "typical holiday weekend" calls were from all over Mercer County. Early Friday, an alleged "streaker" shocked some callers from Sharon. Later Friday, a reported gas leak near Lake Latonka was cleared up by 11:45 p.m.

At about 5 p.m. Saturday, a kid in a "black hoodie" gave Sharon police a run for their money over "some minor crime."

A couple of hours later, there was a report of a burglary on Tamarack Drive in South Pymatuning Township. About 8 p.m., police in Hermitage responded to a hit-and-run accident with no apparent injuries.

Meteor

A plane mystery: Passenger jet makes emergency landing after being hit by unidentified 'foreign object' at 26,000 feet

Image
© Unknown
A passenger jet has been forced to make an emergency landing after an unidentified “foreign object” smashed into its nose cone at 26,000 feet
A passenger jet has been forced to make an emergency landing, after an unidentified "foreign object" smashed into its nose cone at 26,000 feet.

A large dent and scraped paintwork was visible on the Air China Boeing 757 after it landed safely at Chengdu Airport, having been forced to turn back after the pilot said he was struggling to control the plane.

Click here for more images of the damaged aircraft

Investigators are said to be baffled by the dent, reportedly ruling out a bird strike as no blood or feathers were seen around the impact site, but insisting traces of whatever caused the damage are likely to be found under closer inspection.

The plane was flying at around 26,000 feet, climbing over China 20 minutes after take-off during an internal flight between Chengdu and Guangzhou, when passengers are said to have heard a loud bang.
Image
© Unknown
A large dent and scraped paintwork was visible on the Air China Boeing 757 after it landed safely at Chengdu Airport
At the time the pilot is thought to have been unaware of the damage, but contacted air traffic control to report stability issues shortly after hearing the noise.

He was instructed to return to Chengdu, where the damaged nosecone was seen and photographed by passengers disembarking the aircraft.

Comment: No mystery here. Just go over articles in the Fire in the Sky category to get an idea.


Comet 2

New Comet: C/2013 J6 (Catalina)

Discovery: Date May 9, 2013

Magnitude: 19.3 mag

Discoverer: R. A. Kowalski (Catalina Sky Survey)

C/2013 J6
© Aerith Net
Magnitudes Graph
The orbital elements are published on M.P.E.C. 2013-K31.

Fireball 4

Rare meteor shower may 'outburst' on June 11

Rare Meteor Shower_1
© Stellarium
The rare and rarely heard of meteor shower called the Gamma Delphinids will appear to radiate from the constellation Delphinus (del-FINE-us) the Dolphin high in the southern sky shortly before dawn tomorrow morning June 11. This map shows the sky facing south at 3:30 a.m. local time. Delphinus is near the bottom of the bright 3-star figure the Summer Triangle.
Back on June 11, 1930 three members of the American Meteor Society (AMS) in Maryland saw a half-hour-long bright outburst of meteors from the little constellation Delphinus the Dolphin. No one had predicted the shower, but it came out of nowhere and hasn't been seen since. Attempts to catch a repeat performance in subsequent years met with no success.

That may change tomorrow morning, June 11, 2013. Peter Jenniskins, research scientist with the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center, has examined dust outbursts from long-period comets and suggests the Gamma Delphinids may return for a brief moment of splendor, as Earth passes through this stream of cometary debris not seen since 1930.

Windsock

Extreme weather events and earth changes in May 2013



Meteor

Northampton 'explosions' treated as unexplained

Image
© Google
The fire service attended a report of an "explosion" in Castle Street
Three "explosions" heard in the early hours of the morning in Northampton are being treated as unexplained.

Northamptonshire Fire Service investigated the separate reports in St Mary's Street, Castle Street and Silver Street but "didn't find anything".

Andy Gineikis, who lives nearby, said he heard a "loud bang" similar to a shotgun blast at about 03:30 BST.

Western Power Distribution said there had been a power cut in the Abington area of Northampton at about 04:40.

Fireball 5

June Arietids - The invisible meteor shower you just might see

I've never seen an Arietid meteor and chances are you haven't either. Peaking on June 7-8, the Arietid (AIR-ee-uh-tid) meteor shower is one of the strongest of the year with a maximum rate of 50-80 per hour. But there's a rub. The shower radiant, the point in the sky from which the meteors appear to radiate, is near the sun and best seen during daylight hours. When was the last time you saw meteors in daylight?
Image

You might just see a few meteors from the combined Arietids and Zeta Perseid showers that peak Friday and Saturday mornings. This map shows the sky facing northeast at dawn for the mid-section of the U.S. Created with Stellarium
If you're wondering how anyone could discover a meteor shower when the sun is out, it's impossible unless your eyes can see radio waves. The Arietids were first "seen" in 1947 by operators of radio equipment at Jodrell Bank Observatory in England. Meteors leave trails of ionized gases when they rip through our upper atmosphere at tens of thousands of miles per hour and briefly make ideal reflectors of radio waves.
Image
© Jodrell Bank, University of Manchester
Early scientific exploration of the sky in radio waves at Jodrell Bank Observatory in 1945.

Fireball 4

Did you hear a big boom in the area of Smyrna, Tennessee Monday night?

WGNS has received multiple phone calls and emails from residents in the area of Smyrna telling us that they heard a loud "BOOM" sound Monday night. The sound was heard around 8:30 in the evening.

WGNS checked with the Smyrna Police Department where we talked to Police Chief Kevin Arnold. Arnold told us, "We received several complaints last night about that. The Sheriff's Office also received complaints. From the log this morning it appears nothing was found."

We then headed to the Smyrna / Rutherford County Airport. There, we were told that no "BOOM" sounds involving airplanes were reported on Monday night. Several workers there told us they did not hear the "BOOM."

So that leaves us with the big question... What was that big "BOOM" sound that was heard Monday? It seems as if we cannot find the answer to that mystery.

Fireball 2

Crashed asteroid has a tail that keeps getting longer

A strange comet-like object discovered in 2010 ended up being an asteroid that had been the victim of a head-on collision from another space rock. The object created a bit of buzz because of its mysterious X-shaped debris pattern and long, trailing streamers of dust. Named P/2010 A2 (LINEAR), the object is located in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter, and has been the focus of much study, including images taken by the Hubble Space Telescope and many ground-based observatories. But over time, the asteroid's long dust tail has grown to be so long that the entire object can't fit into the field of view of most observatories.
Image
© NASA, ESA, and D. Jewitt (UCLA)
Hubble Views of Comet-like Asteroid P/2010 A2.
"Here, we are watching the death of an asteroid," said Jayadev Rajagopal, a scientist at the WIYN (Wisconsin Indiana at Yale NOAO) Telescope, speaking today at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Indianapolis, Indiana. "We know of dozens of asteroids this has happened to in the past, but this is the only one showing us the event as it is happening."

Using the new wide-field camera at the WIYN 3.5 meter telescope, Rajagopal and his team have found that the peculiar asteroid P/2010 A2′s tail is much longer than was previously supposed. The tail is about a million kilometers long, roughly three times the distance from the Earth to the Moon. The new One Degree Imager (ODI) can currently image an area of the sky about the size of the full moon: a future upgrade will increase the size of the field to about four times as large.

Fireball 4

Fireball over Taiwan, 31 May 2013