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Tue, 27 Oct 2020
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Fireballs

Fireball 5

Meteor lights up Bay Area sky for third night in a row

Fireball
© Ray Chavez/Bay Area News Group/KGO Photo
A bright meteor lit up the Bay Area sky for a third night in a row.
Los Angeles -- A bright meteor lit up the Bay Area sky on Friday night.

Bay Area News Group photographer Ray Chavez snapped pictures of it from San Lorenzo and then tweeted them.

This is the third night in a row that large meteors have been spotted. Right now we are in the midst of the South Taurids meteor shower. It peaked last month, but can still produce stunning shooting stars.

Meteor

Mysterious, loud and roaring noise awakens residents in Oklahoma City

Residents on the southwest side of Oklahoma City are trying to figure out what made a loud, roaring noise early Friday morning that interrupted their sleep for hours.


From about midnight to 2 a.m., News 9 received dozens of emails, phone calls and Facebook posts about the noise. People said it rattled windows and shook their homes.

Fireball 5

Surprising recent discoveries of three large Near-Earth Objects

Two surprisingly large Near-Earth Asteroids have been discovered in just the last week or so, as well as a third moderately large asteroid which surprisingly has also gone undetected until now, even though it can pass close enough to the Earth to be classified as "potentially hazardous".

Not since 1983 has any near-Earth asteroid been found as large as the approximately 20-kilometer (12-mile) size of the two new large ones. In fact, there are only three other known near-Earth asteroids that are of comparable size or larger than the two new large ones.
Image
© NASA/JPL-Caltech
The orbits of 2013 UQ4, 2013 US10 and 2013 UP8 are shown in a view looking down on the plane of the solar system. While 2013 US10 and 2013 UP8 orbit the sun in a counter clockwise direction (so called "direct" orbits like all the planets and most asteroids), 2013 UQ4 orbits in a clockwise (retrograde) direction.
It is important to note that none of these three new large near-Earth asteroids can come close enough to the Earth to represent a near-term threat to our planet.

The first of the new large near-Earth asteroid discoveries is named 2013 UQ4, and it is perhaps the most unusual. This approximately 19-kilometer (12-mile) wide object was spotted by the Catalina Sky Survey on Oct. 23 when the asteroid was 435 million kilometers (270 million miles) away from Earth. Not only is this object unusually large, it follows a very unusual highly inclined, retrograde orbit about the Sun, which means it travels around the Sun in the opposite direction of all the planets and the vast majority of asteroids.

Fireball

There was a crazy-looking fireball over Los Angeles

Californians from Fresno to San Diego reported seeing a crazy-looking fireball streak across the sky this evening around 8 p.m. There were a lot of fake photos being passed around, but CBS Los Angeles found some security footage that captured the fireball:


So what's going on here? It's likely a part of a meteor shower going on that has a reputation for putting on quite a show around Halloween every year. Every year in late October and early November, the earth passes through the dust of a comet named Comet Encke. One astronomy website described the shower this way: "Although a modest shower, the Taurids can surprise you with a flamboyant fireball or two!" A meteorologist with the National Weather Service told the San Gabriel Valley Tribune that's likely what us Southern Californians saw tonight.


Comment: Regardless of whether it was a stray meteor from the Taurids meteor shower or not, something is afoot out there. Fireball sightings are becoming the norm instead of the odd occurrence all around the BBM. Comets and The Horns of Moses


Fireball 3

Chelyabinsk meteor explosion was so bright, radiation burned people's eyes and skin

At its most intense, meteor fireball glowed 30 times brighter than the sun causing skin and retinal burns, say researchers
Image
© Marat Ahmetvaleev
Scientists have published the most complete picture yet of the devastation caused by the meteor that exploded over the city of Chelyabinsk in Russia this year.

The 20-metre-wide space rock hurtled into the skies over the city in February and began to tear apart at an altitude of 28 miles. Travelling at a speed of 12 miles per second, the rock exploded with the energy of around 500 kilotonnes of TNT, researchers found.

Directly beneath the meteor's path, the shockwave was powerful enough to knock people off their feet. Windows were shattered in more than 3,600 apartment blocks, and a factory roof collapsed.

In the local library in Yemanzhelinsk, 30 miles away, a statue of Pushkin cracked when it was struck by a blown-out window frame. At least 1,210 people were treated for injuries, most from falling building debris and flying glass.


Fireball 5

Massive 'blast' felt in Chicago was not from earthquake or quarry blast - Another overhead meteor explosion?

Image
People in the western suburbs who felt the earth move Monday weren't imagining it. But the cause remains a mystery.

The U.S. Geological Survey assigned the tremor that occurred about 12:35 p.m. near Countryside a preliminary magnitude of 3.7. Soon after, they downgraded the tremor to 3.2 and said it wasn't an earthquake, but likely was caused by work at a nearby quarry.

"Based on what they've looked at, we're pretty sure it's from a blast," said Paul Caruso, a geophysicist with the Survey. "It is not an earthquake."

The website Did You Feel It?, which is operated by the agency, reported that by midafternoon more than 700 people had contacted the site to say they had, indeed, felt it. Police departments in Hinsdale, Elmhurst and elsewhere said residents called to report the tremor.

Fireball 2

Amazing fireball caught in the sky of Japan - October 30, 2013

This car driver was lucky to have is camera on... He indeed recorded a long fireball traveling across the sky over Japan.


This great meteor record was caught on Oct. 30, 2013 near Yokohama, in Japan. The following picture was shot from Asahi Village in the Nagano Prefecture.

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© http://sonotaco.jp/forum/viewtopic.php?t=3116&sid=82158aeeb5e267abbce200972516d5fc
Fireball seen across Japan – October 30 2013

Fireball

Fireball explodes over Sarajevo at 30km above the ground

Image
© AD Orion
Bolide entering the atmosphere photographed from Sarajevo
Multiple explosions were registered last night at 00:36:59 as bolide penetrated the atmosphere. Its fragments could have hit the ground.

The cameras of Bosnia and Hercegovina Meteorite Network run by Orion Astronomic Society and Hydrometeorological Institute in Sarajevo, located in Sarajevo, Gradačac and Pelješac, registered bolide incursion with above -9 magnitude equal to the Moon glow in the first quarter.

This is the brightest meteorite event every since the Meteorite Network commenced with its experimental activities in tracking the sky activity.

The fireball plummeted at 20 km/s speed and exploded/extinguished at about 30 km from the ground.

Fireball 5

Russian fireball explosion shows meteor risk greater than thought

Supercomputer simulation
© Randy Montoya/Sandia
Supercomputer simulation shows details of a fireball that might be expected from an asteroid exploding in Earth's atmosphere. A team led by Sandia National Laboratories researcher Mark Boslough devised the simulation.
Denver - As researchers recover more leftover pieces from the space rock that detonated earlier this year near the Russian city of Chelyabinsk, the event is helping to flag a worrisome finding: Scientists have misjudged the frequency of large airbursts.

Computer simulations also imply that such airbursts cause more damage than nuclear explosions of the same yield, which are typically used as an analogue to ballpark impact risk.

The meteor explosion over Chelyabinsk gives the bottom-line message that the risk from airbursts is greater than previously thought.

Fireball 4

Fireball in Pacific Northwest sky likely landed in Pacific Ocean

Image
© American Meteor Society
Preliminary trajectory
A fireball in the sky above the Pacific Northwest led dozens of people to report sightings to the American Meteor Society on Wednesday. The FOX 12 newsroom started receiving reports of a bright light flashing across the sky around 6 a.m. Wednesday.

AMS experts said it appears the decent-sized meteor entered the Earth's atmosphere in Washington state, traveled in an east-to-west direction and landed in the Pacific Ocean. "It went from one horizon to the other, never fading," said one witness. A report out of Tigard said it "traveled east to west across the entire visible sky - very long."

Another witness, out of Gladstone, described it as "the longest lasting shooting star I've ever seen."

There were also reported sightings in British Columbia, Alberta, Montana and Washington. Because of cloud cover in the Seattle area, there were very few reported sightings there. Experts at OMSI say a fireball is another term for a very bright meteor, generally brighter than magnitude -4, which is about the same magnitude of the planet Venus in the morning or evening sky.