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Thu, 21 Oct 2021
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Wildfires

Bizarro Earth

NASA says smoke from Australian bushfires will soon circle the earth

Bushfire smoke near the International Space Station
© NASA
Bushfire smoke as seen near the International Space Station
Smoke from the massive bushfires in Australia will soon circle the Earth back to the nation, says Nasa.

Massive infernos have raged along the nation's east coast for months, pushing smoke across the Pacific.

Nasa said plumes from blazes around New Year's Day had crossed South America, turning skies there hazy, and moved "halfway around Earth" by 8 January.

"The smoke is expected to make at least one full circuit around the globe," the US space agency said.

Hundreds of bushfires have burnt across Australia, killing at least 28 people and destroying more than 2,000 homes.

Comment: Athletes participating in the 2020 Australian Open are struggling to breathe in the hazardous conditions. One player was forced to abandon her match after a coughing fit :






Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Australia ash/smoke cloud circles Southern Hemisphere - Taal volcano erupts

Taal volcano in Philippines 'goes electric' January 2020
© BBC
Taal volcano in Philippines 'goes electric' January 2020
Dust, ask and smoke in both hemispheres causing strange weather extremes. Australia ash/smoke cloud from fires passed over New Zealand causing summer snow, South America next for that plume to pass over. Taal erupts in Philippines on the same low solar activity lows as was seen in 1913 which we reached in Dec 2019. Dust storms the length of Australia add to the blowing ash/smoke from the wildfires there. Question: How much debris in our atmosphere does it take before temperatures drop?


Comment: Taal Volcano near Manila, Philippines erupts for first time in 50 years - Onlookers stunned by electric display


Fire

California wildfires not caused by climate change - experts

California wildfires
© Reuters / Gene Blevins
A panel of experts said Wednesday that California's devastating wildfires were caused primarily by "the way we manage lands and develop our landscape" rather than climate change.

Speaking at the annual conference of the National Council for Science and the Environment in Washington D.C., Scott Stephens, a professor of fire science at the University of California, Berkeley, said that perhaps 20 to 25 percent of the wildfire damage resulted from climate change, whereas "75 percent is the way we manage lands and develop our landscape."

Stephens noted that in past centuries, wildfires were far more widespread than they are today, and played a vital role in California's ecosystem by helping to thin forests, Thomas Frank reported for E&E News.

Comment:


Fire

Nearly a quarter of a million Australians urged to flee as huge wildfires revitalize

A large plume of smoke is seen over a sheep property in the Parndana region on Kangaroo Island, Australia
© Lisa Maree Williams / Getty Images
A large plume of smoke is seen over a sheep property in the Parndana region on Kangaroo Island, Australia, on Thursday. Residents of the Kangaroo Island township of Parndana and Vivonne Bay have been told to evacuate as fire threatens both areas.
Australian authorities urged nearly a quarter of a million people to evacuate their homes and prepared military backup as soaring temperatures and erratic winds were expected to fan deadly wildfires across the east coast.

Temperatures were expected to shoot well above 104 degrees Fahrenheit in several parts of the country Friday, accompanied by high winds, threatening to inflame fires that have already left thousands of people homeless.

"If you can get out, you should get out, you shouldn't be in the remote and forested parts of our State," Andrew Crisp, emergency management commissioner for the state of Victoria, told the Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

Emergency alert text messages had been sent to 240,000 people in Victoria state alone, telling them to leave, Crisp said. People in high-risk regions in New South Wales and South Australia states were also urged to think about leaving, but authorities had not provided numbers.


Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Behind the Australian bushfires - What you're not told

A kangaroo rushes past a burning house amid apocalyptic scenes in Conjola, New South Wales
© Matthew Abbott / New York Times / Redux / eyevine
A kangaroo rushes past a burning house amid apocalyptic scenes in Conjola, New South Wales
Australia continues with its wildfires but what is missing from the story is that 205 of those fires were deliberately set and during the first week of 2020 25+ locations in the country set their all time lowest cold record for January. There is much to the story with the prime minister off on a Hawaiian holiday at the most critical moments. Here is the story the corporate media left out.


Comment: See also:


Bullseye

Paul Joseph Watson: The Truth About the Australian Bushfires

bushfire_sydney

Flames bear down on Harrington, some 335kms northeast of Sydney, 8 Nov 2019
It has nothing to do with climate change.


Comment: See also:


Fire

Ice Age Farmer Report: AUSTRALIA: Burned on the altar of global warming

Australia fires
Over 10 million hectares of Australia have burned, including much crop and ranch land. "The wildfires will get worse, and they will make believers out of you climate deniers!" The establishment is keeping Jerry Brown's promise, burning over 10 million hectares of Australia, and screaming "Global warming!" ... while dealing a massive blow to global food production and the world's #3 beef exporter.


Sources

Camera

Spooky 'devil face' captured amid Australia's bushfires

Spooky 'devil face' in Australian bushfire
© SUNRISE
Craig Calvert (L) sent this photo to Sunrise on Friday.
Devastated dairy farmer Craig Calvert, who spent 13 hours fighting fires threatening his property in Victoria, has shared an eerie image of the blaze which depicts "a big devil face" in the billowing smoke.

"I'm not really into hokey pokey spooky stuff but there's a big devil face right in the fire," he told Sunrise on Friday.

"It's just ridiculous, you won't believe, I don't believe it."

Calvert, from Sarsfield, has "extensive fire experience" and "knew it was going to be bad" when fires approached his property earlier this week.

"We had fireballs coming over, jumping. Some of them were 50 metres to 100 metres across," Calvert told Sunrise.

"It didn't even burn the trees. It was burning the gas on top of the trees - It was almost like white flame."


Comment: Aussie police say arsonists & lightning real cause of bushfires, NOT climate change


Arrow Up

Smoke and deception blanket Australia

We've been hearing much fake news about the Australian bush fires supposedly having been caused by man-made climate change. Yet it has emerged that Australian authorities were warned years ago that poor land management practices were in fact escalating the risk of devastating fires, according to an expert.

Forest fuel level highest in 1000 years

In 2015, bush fire scientist David Packham warned of a "huge blaze threat" and urged an "increase in fuel reduction burns".

"Forest fuel levels had climbed to their most dangerous level in thousands of years," wrote Darren Gray here in 2015. Today the public is being misled by climate alarmists and the media on the real causes of the devastating bush fires now taking place.

In fact NASA data shows that the area burned by global wildfires dropped by 25% since 2003, according to the Global Warming Policy Forum (GWPF)

Temperature Trends Australia
© NASA GISS

Fire

Aussie police say arsonists & lightning real cause of bushfires, NOT climate change

firenado australia 2020
© YouTube/3W-News
Authorities in Australia are working on the premise that arsonists and lightning strikes are to blame for bushfires that have devastated numerous areas of the country, not "climate change" as many global warming alarmists have claimed.

Since November, the fires have struck various regions of the state of New South Wales, destroying thousands of buildings and killing at least 22 people.

Despite the fact that bushfires are not uncommon in Australia, the severity of the damage led numerous climate change alarmists to blame the disaster on man-made global warming.

Comment: Common sense. The Aborigine populations knew this, and conducted yearly rotating burns of their hunting grounds to keep fuel from accumulating and to attract game to the new vegetation.