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Sun, 19 Aug 2018
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Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Signs in the skies of the Eddy Solar Grand Minimum

antisolar arc 2018
© Pål Tengesdal
Signs are appearing our skies that the atmosphere is changing as predicted with the gran solar minimum. Rare anti-solar arcs over Norway, Cyclone over Yemen and Oman, Green flashes in UK and Norway. Hawaii has blue flames as the Earth cracks and methane ignites and CO2 didn't cause warming in 1950-1980 even though it was increasing in concentration. A look at Wheeler's drought clock, another repeating cycle as well the grand solar minimum.


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Binoculars

Methane outgassing produces eerie blue flames near Hawaii's Kilauea volcano

kilaeua methane blue flame hawaii
© CBS News
At Hawaii's Kilauea volcano, eerie blue flames indicate the presence of methane gas.
Blue flames burning in the lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano are raising new fears of explosions. Emergency officials say if fissures open west of Pahoa, lava could block the one remaining open highway. If that happens, about 1,000 people would have to be helicoptered to safety, reports CBS News' Mark Strassmann.

Residents are also eyeing another disturbing development. After three weeks of gawking at images of bright red lava bursting skyward, the Big Island's focus has shifted to something blue and worrisome: blue flames that indicate the presence of methane gas. Methane gas is a result of the lava burning plants and trees. Scientists say it can trigger explosions if ignited while trapped underground.

"It's the first time, maybe the second time I've seen the blue flames thing. It's very dramatic, very eerie," geophysicist Jim Kauahikaua said.

Fire

Kilauea's fiery flow threatening a significant source of Hawaii's power supply

kilauea lava thratens power plant
© Mario Tama/Getty Images
Lava from the Kilauea volcano approaches the Puna Geothermal Venture plant on Hawaii's Big Island on Monday.
Updated at 5:27 p.m. ET

In the weeks since the Kilauea volcano began belching lava into Hawaii's residential areas, the fiery flow has destroyed dozens of structures and covered scores of acres on the Big Island. But authorities fear its destructive reach could ravage at least two more cornerstones of the state: its power supply and, a little less tangibly, its all-important tourism industry.

On Monday evening local time, the Hawaii County Civil Defense agency announced that lava from nearby fissures had begun to encroach on the southern edge of a significant source of the Big Island's power, the Puna Geothermal Venture.

The plant harvests hot liquid and steam from underground wells to drive turbine generators for electricity, which is then sold to the state's utility.

Another risk, besides the loss of power, rests in what might happen if the lava overcomes the state's protective measures: "There's a steam release, there's many chemicals, but primarily the critical factor would be hydrogen sulfide, a very deadly gas," Hawaii's Emergency Management Agency chief, Tom Travis, told reporters Monday night.

Comment:


Fire

Lava haze: A look at Hawaii's latest volcanic hazard

kilauea haze hazard
© AP Photo/Jae C. Hong
Plumes of steam rise as lava enters the ocean near Pahoa, Hawaii Sunday, May 20, 2018. Kilauea volcano that is oozing, spewing and exploding on Hawaii’s Big Island has gotten more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock pouring into the ocean Sunday and flying lava causing the first major injury.
Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano is pouring into the sea and setting off a chemical reaction that creates giant clouds of acid and fine glass.

The lava haze, or "laze," is created when molten rock hits the ocean and marks just the latest hazard from a volcano that has been generating earthquakes and spewing lava, sulfur dioxide and ash since it began erupting in Big Island backyards on May 3.

The dangers have forced at least 2,000 people to evacuate and destroyed more than 40 buildings. It's also created anxiety for thousands of others about the possibility of lava heading their way or cutting off roads they depend on to get to work, school and grocery stores.

Here are key things to know about the latest volcanic threat:

Comment: See also:


Fire

First volcano-related injury recorded - man suffers serious burns from lava spatter

leilani estates lava rift
© USGS/HVO
Lava fountains from the new fissure eruption at Leilani Estates on Kilauea, seen on May 5, 2018.
A man was seriously injured when he was hit with lava spatter while standing on his third-floor balcony - the first known injury related to Hawaii's Kilauea volcano eruptions as new volcanic activity creates new threats in surrounding neighborhoods.

The homeowner on Noni Farms Road in Pahoa was hit with lava on the shin and taken to the hospital with serious injuries, Janet Snyder, spokeswoman for the Office of the Mayor, told Reuters.

"It hit him on the shin, and shattered everything from there down on his leg," Snyder said, adding that the lava spatter could weigh "as much as a refrigerator."

"And even small pieces of spatter can kill," she said.

No other information about the man and his condition were released as of Sunday morning.

Fire

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Lava composition changes from Kilauea volcano & sulfur dioxide emissions increase 300%

Kilauea lava flow
© Daily Mail (screen capture)
The lava type on Kilauea has changed to very liquid, very fluid which moved miles and formed rivers of lava to the sea overnight. The lava is more like flowing water than lava at the moment. Sulfur Dioxide has also increased 300% and officials warn of toxic air filled with silica needles, a serious breathing hazard.


Comment: Kilauea volcano growing more hazardous - spewing lava causes first major injury




Attention

Merapi volcano in Indonesia erupts for the 2nd time in 2 weeks

This picture taken on May 20, 2018 shows the Mount Sinabung volcano spewing ash into the air and lightning from its crater in Karo.
© Anto Sembiring
This picture taken on May 20, 2018 shows the Mount Sinabung volcano spewing ash into the air and lightning from its crater in Karo.
Indonesia's most volatile volcano spewed smoke and ash early Monday in the latest of several eruptions in less than two weeks.

Mount Merapi on the main island of Java erupted twice, sending a column of volcanic material up to 1,200 meters (3,930 feet) into the air and making ash fall in several villages, said Sutopo Purwo Nugroho, the disaster mitigation agency spokesman.

He said the alert level of the volcano was not raised, which is at a normal level with no eruption expected in the foreseeable future.


Attention

Washington's hidden Glacier Peak volcano is one of the most dangerous and least monitored

Recently completed lidar maps of Glacier Peak strip away the heavy vegetation and reveal the underlying topography, including tracks of past eruptions and lahars.
© Washington Department of Natural Resources
Recently completed lidar maps of Glacier Peak strip away the heavy vegetation and reveal the underlying topography, including tracks of past eruptions and lahars.
As Kilauea continues its rampage on Hawaii's Big Island, the 38th anniversary this month of Mount St. Helens' cataclysmic eruption is an uneasy reminder that the snow-capped volcanoes of the Pacific Northwest can awaken at any time.

Yet one of Washington's most dangerous volcanoes remains the least-monitored and the least-studied in the Cascade range.

Tucked deep inside its namesake 566,000-acre wilderness a scant 70 miles northeast of Seattle, Glacier Peak is the state's hidden volcano. At a modest 10,541 feet, its summit doesn't tower over the landscape like Rainier, Baker or Adams. Settlers didn't even realize it was a volcano until the 1850s, when Native Americans told the naturalist and ethnologist George Gibbs about a small mountain north of Rainier that once smoked.

Comment: As many in the vicinity of Hawaii's Kilauea have discovered, it's one thing to be aware of the potential activity of a volcano and it is extremely mportant to closely monitor the situation, because when it begins to unleash its fury the only choice you have is to get out of its way. And when we consider volcanic activity appears to be on the increase, now more than ever do citizens need to be ready:


Fire

Kilauea volcano growing more hazardous - spewing lava causes first major injury

Kilauea volcano grows
A volcano on Hawaii's Big Island that is oozing and spewing lava and exploding with ash and gas has become more hazardous in recent days, with rivers of molten rock flowing into the ocean and flying lava causing the first major injury.

Kilauea began erupting more than two weeks ago. It has burned dozens of homes, forced people to flee and shot up plumes of steam from its summit that led officials to distribute face masks to protect against ash particles. Lava flows have grown more vigorous in past days, in one instance spattering molten rock that hit a man in the leg.

The man was outside his home on Saturday in the remote, rural region affected by the volcano when the lava "hit him on the shin, and shattered everything from there down on his leg" said Hawaii County mayor's spokeswoman Janet Snyder told Hawaii News Now TV.

Lava flying through the air from cracks in the earth can weigh as much as a refrigerator and even small pieces can be lethal, officials said.


Cloud Precipitation

Ice Age Farmer Report: Kilauea's explosive eruption, biblical hail kills people, crops

volcano
Explosive eruption at Kilauea this morning after increased seismic activity overnight. More massive hail storms around the world are damaging people, homes, animals, and crops alike, much as records from the previous Grand Solar Minima indicate happened in the past as well. Are you growing your own food yet?


Sources

Comment: See in addition for some more historical perspective: Baseball-sized hail: How severe hailstorms have caused devastation and killed people