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Tue, 07 Dec 2021
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Attention

Climate doom pantomime at Glasgow

Think of Glasgow as a costume party for the Uber rich and it all makes sense.

Everyone gets to hobnob, dress up in a Superhero prophet-of-doom outfit and pretend to save the world.

When the richest people in the world turn up, with PM's and Presidents, and even the Royals do live photo tweets — you know the dry UN science conference has turned into the unmissable Olympics of Social Events. Just being there is the fashion statement of the year.
Psychopaths
© @KensingtonRoyal
Hobnobbing The Duke and Duchess of Cambridge’s .

The deals (or spin, such it is) is mostly done. The party is the reward. The World Stage beckons for politicians seeking to look important. While the offer of another glorious junket keeps the minor minions working hard all year.


And any fence-sitting politicians might be awed and swept away in the spur of the moment to offer more than they might have in the cold light of day. (Send them your barbs!)

Bezos & Private Jet
© Unity News Net

Cloud Precipitation

'Prodigious' Alaskan storm dumps record rain, 10 + FEET of snow

After smashing records and destroying roads

After smashing records and destroying roads, rain continues to fall in Girdwood.
A powerful, historic storm has walloped southern Alaska for days, unloading extreme amounts of precipitation and overwhelming its infrastructure in some areas.

The deluge, intensified by climate change, has flooded communities south of Anchorage and transformed trickling waterways into raging rivers. Excessive amounts of snow, measured in feet, have buried the high terrain, and the long-lasting storm won't fully relent until Wednesday.

The historic rainfall generated by the storm, includes one of the top four heaviest two-day amounts ever observed in the state, nearly 20 inches.

The rain keep coming at Portage Glacier Visitor Center, east of Girdwood. This is an immense of rain at sea level in less than three days from a non-tropical system. #akwx @Climatologist49 @EmilySchwing @TimLydonAK pic.twitter.com/svx53bmf6b

— Rick Thoman (@AlaskaWx) November 1, 2021

Snowflake

11 FEET of snow pounds Alaskan ski resort + Asia braces for a harsh winter

snow
Alyeska Resort in Girdwood has started its snow season in jaw-dropping fashion.

Officially, Alaska's largest ski resort begins recording its annual snowfall on October 1, but this year historic falls hit earlier than usual with 13 inches "unofficially" settling on September 23:


September's snowstorm was a mere taster of things to come. Since that official start date of Oct 1, a whopping 136 inches (11.3 feet) of global warming goodness has accumulated at the top of the mountain (to Nov 1). Breaking down the numbers - data courtesy of alyeskaresort.com— 22 inches of that fell within the last 24 hours, with the 'snow depth' at the summit currently standing at an astonishing 67 inches.


Snowflake

Some states short hundreds of snowplow drivers as winter nears


SNOW PLOW
AccuWeather has confirmed six states are short 100 or more drivers to clear interstates and highways. Find out if that means where you live.


Source: AccuWeather

Snowflake Cold

Lows nearing -40C sweep Russia, Northern Hemisphere snow mass above average, + X-flare: 'swing and a miss'

snow
The lies of those with vested interests are being exposed — more and more people are realizing that the rules of humankind are malleable, that there is no fixed authority requiring religious-like adherence. The days of multinational conglomerates paying governments to push profitable falsehoods at the detriment of the human race are coming to an end. The average Joe, in enough numbers, can impart change — this epiphany is dawning on people, and it's giving me a shit-load of hope.

LOWS NEARING -40 SWEEP RUSSIA

As 'our betters' in Glasgow bemoan the impacts of global warming in, among other places, Siberia: "the planet's last great wilderness", northern Russia has actually been experiencing extraordinary lows for the time of year.

On October 31, -36.8C (-34.2F) was registered in Delyankir.

The infamous Verkhoyansk logged -36.6C (-33.9F).

A frigid -36.4C (-33.5F) was observed in Susuman.

While Oymyakon took the cherry with a reading of -38.9C (-38F) on Nov 1 — almost 10C below the seasonal average

Attention

Climate change fueled witch hunts....Then and now

Witch Burns
© Landover Baptist Church
European witch hunts of the 15th to 17th centuries targeted witches that were thought to be responsible for epidemics and crop failures related to declining temperatures of the Little Ice Age. A belief that evil humans were negatively affecting the climate and weather patterns was the "consensus" opinion of that time. How eerily similar is that notion to the the current oft-repeated mantra that Man's actions are controlling the climate and leading to catastrophic consequences?

Inquisitor Kramer
© CO2 Coalition
The first extensive European witch hunts coincided with plunging temperatures as the continent transitioned away from the beneficial warmth of the Medieval Warm Period (850 to 1250 AD). Increasing cold that began in the 13th century ushered in nearly five centuries of advancing mountain glaciers and prolonged periods of rainy or cool weather. This time of naturally-driven climate change was accompanied by crop failure, hunger, rising prices, epidemics and mass depopulation.

Climate Change Witch Hunts
© CO2 Coalition
Large systematic witch hunts began in the 1430s and were advanced later in the century by an Alsatian Dominican friar and papal Inquisitor named Heinrich Kramer. At Kramer's urging, Pope Innocence VIII issued an encyclical enshrining the persecution and eradication of weather-changing witches through this papal edict. The worst of the Inquisition's abuses and later systemic witch hunts were, in part, empowered by this decree.

This initial period of cooler temperatures and failing crops continued through the first couple of decades of the 16th century, when a slight warming was accompanied by improvements in harvests. Clearly, the pogrom against the weather-changing witches had been successful!

Unfortunately for the people of the Late Middle Ages, the forty years or so of slight warming gave ground to a more severe bout of cooling. The summer of 1560 brought a return of coldness and wetness that led to severe decline in harvest, crop failure and increases in infant mortality and epidemics. Bear in mind that this was an agrarian subsistence culture, nearly totally dependent on the yearly harvest to survive. One bad harvest could be tolerated, but back-to-back failures would cause horrific consequences, and indeed they did.

Ice Cube

Scientists create 'superionic ice' in a lab

Using the Advanced Photon Source, scientists have recreated the structure of ice formed at the center of planets like Neptune and Uranus.
Superionic ice
© Vitali Prakapenka
Scientists used diamonds and a beam of brilliant X-rays to recreate the conditions deep inside planets, and found a new phase of water called “superionic ice.”
Everyone knows about ice, liquid and vapor — but, depending on the conditions, water can actually form more than a dozen different structures. Scientists have now added a new phase to the list: superionic ice.

This type of ice forms at extremely high temperatures and pressures, such as those deep inside planets like Neptune and Uranus. Previously superionic ice had only been glimpsed in a brief instant as scientists sent a shockwave through a droplet of water, but in a new study published in Nature Physics, scientists found a way to reliably create, sustain and examine the ice.

"It was a surprise — everyone thought this phase wouldn't appear until you are at much higher pressures than where we first find it," said study co-author Vitali Prakapenka, a University of Chicago research professor and beamline scientist at the Advanced Photon Source (APS), a U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Science user facility at the DOE's Argonne National Laboratory. ​"But we were able to very accurately map the properties of this new ice, which constitutes a new phase of matter, thanks to several powerful tools."

Comet 2

536 AD, the year the sky went dark

moon eclipse
© NASA/Hinode/XRT
The moon passing in front of the sun during an annular solar eclipse on Jan. 4, 2011.
You wake up to a dark, dreary, glum-feeling, Monday-type of morning. For the 547th consecutive day.

Just 18 months prior, you were a hard-working farmer gearing up for another bountiful crop season.

But then the skies went dark.

From early 536 to 537, they stayed dark. Across much of eastern Europe and throughout Asia, spring turned into summer and fall gave way to winter without a day of sunshine. Like a blackout curtain over the sun, millions of people across the world's most populated countries squinted through dim conditions, breathing in chokingly thick air and losing nearly every crop they were relying on to harvest.

This isn't the plot of a dystopian TV drama or a fantastical "docufiction" production.

This was a harsh reality for the millions of people that lived through that literally dark time or, as some historians have declared, the very worst year ever to be alive.

Comment: It's a shame to see the research trend of 15-20 years ago veer off course away from comets as the likely cause of sudden catastrophic climate change. However, it's good to see that at least some climate science acknowledges that the only climate change worth really worrying about is the sudden, NATURALLY-CAUSED kind.

We get it though. Comets are just too much for people. It's scary to contemplate, and disturbs too many beliefs.


Snowflake

Massive October snowstorm dumps up to 42 inches of snow in 36 hours on Sierra Nevada ski resorts

Heavenly

Snow at Heavenly
A huge snowstorm hitting North America's West Coast has dumped up to 105cm (42") on Californian ski slopes in around 36 hours.

The only ski areas currently open already for the 21-22 season in North America are in Colorado, but now California's Mammoth Mountain says it plans to open two weeks earlier than originally intended, this coming Friday, ready for Halloween weekend. It's not yet clear if other areas will open early, Heavenly (pictured top) has indicated its sticking to its original November opening date.

Mt Rose posted the biggest snowfall so far (38-42″ / 95-105cm) but Palisades Tahoe (formerly Squaw Valley) came close saying it had had at least three feet (90cm) at the top of the mountain and posted the image below.


Snowflake

3 people killed in snowstorm in Kashmir, India - 3 feet of snow reported

snow
Two persons died while two others were rescued from Sinthan Pass in Kokernag areas of south Kashmir's Anantnag after getting stranded in a snowstorm in the area, an official said on Sunday.

The two persons rescued from the area are being treated for hypothermia and shock at Sub-district hospital Kokernag, an official said. The deceased have been identified as Imtiyaz Ahmad Mir of Khualchul, Kishtiwar, Dawood Ahmad Lone of Dadpath, Kishtiwar.

The four were traveling in two different vegetable-laden Tata mobile load carriers bearing registration numbers JK17-0053 and JK17-9334.The rescue team comprised SDM Kokernag, SDPO Kokernag, 19 RR, Police and SDRF. An official said, the rescue team traveled through rough snow-locked and foggy terrain, aided by MED machinery, and then walked 8 km in freezing winds and snow to rescue the stranded persons. "The operation was carried on the directions of DC Anantnag, Dr. Piyush Singla," he said.