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Sun, 29 Jan 2023
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Nightmare fall of the United States

Martin Armstrong
Legendary financial and geopolitical cycle analyst Martin Armstrong said just before the 2022 midterm elections that voter fraud and cheating will set up a very troubling 2023. Armstrong is predicting "a major turning point in January of 2023." Armstrong explains, "The computer (Socrates program) is showing that January is going to be the major turning point for the entire year of 2023. . . . The currencies are rallying against the dollar, and that should go into early January and then after that, this thing looks like death warmed over. Perhaps it is the insanity of handing Patriot missiles over to Ukraine. I know Ukraine very well, and I am telling you they will use them offensively and not defensively. They will use them to attack Russia. Their whole objective is to expand the war."

Armstrong says Biden Administration economy killing policies will, ". . .only increase inflation, and this is an endless nightmare. In all honesty, I hope the Republicans move to impeach Biden. I am not even sure Biden is aware of all the things taking place. It is the people behind him that are doing this. They are the ones writing these agendas, and they are a bunch of climate zealots, and they have no idea what they are doing. . . . This is getting to be insane, and I think you are going to see that January is going to be a very, very big turning point . . . with the Republicans in the House, they will probably start impeachment proceedings and a lot more investigations."

Armstrong thinks, "The U.S. dollar will be going up . . . Gold and all other tangible assets will also go up in value" right along with "interest rates and inflation going up" too.

Snowflake

Hawaii pummeled with near-blizzard conditions just a week after Mauna Loa's eruption simmers - 6 inches of snowfall

A view Monday afternoon, Dec. 19, from a Mauna Kea camera looking east.
© Hawaii.edu / FOX Weather
A view Monday afternoon, Dec. 19, from a Mauna Kea camera looking east.
The mainland isn't the only one experiencing a major winter storm. Just a week after Mauna Loa stopped erupting, Winter Storm Warnings were issued for Hawaii's Big Island.

The National Weather Service issued the alert for heavy and blowing snow on Monday, with the Winter Storm Warning in effect until 6 a.m. HST on Tuesday.

Up to 8 inches of snow and winds gusting as high as 100 mph are possible on Big Island Summits above 10,500 feet.

Mauna Loa, the world's largest active volcano, sits at 13,680 feet above sea level, and Mauna Kea, a dormant volcano, is just over 13,800 feet. Both are expected to see near-blizzard conditions.


Snowflake

Heavy snow has left thousands without power in New England and New York

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© Jason E. Vines
Utility crews raced Saturday to restore power to tens of thousands of customers across New England and New York after a powerful storm dumped 2 feet of snow in some places.

More than 160,000 customers in New England were in the dark as of the afternoon and another 20,000 were without power in New York as heavy snow brought tree limbs onto power lines, according to poweroutage.us, which tracks outages across the country.

Restoration efforts were complicated by snow still falling in some places, making travel dangerous. Doug Foley, Eversource president of electric operations in New Hampshire, said snow-covered roads were making it tough for workers to reach communities in order to assess damage and make repairs.


Snowflake

Niigata, southern Tohoku in Japan hit by record snowfalls - 2.2 meters (7.2 feet) deep

People walk through wind and snow on Monday morning in Shibetsu, Hokkaido.
© The Yomiuri Shimbun
People walk through wind and snow on Monday morning in Shibetsu, Hokkaido.
A strong cold snap has brought record snowfalls to Niigata Prefecture on the Sea of Japan and the southern Tohoku region. Japan's Meteorological Agency warns that more snow is coming and advises people to be on high alert for traffic disruptions and other problems.

Weather officials said that as of 5 p.m. on Monday, the snow was about 2.2 meters deep in Ohkura Village, Yamagata Prefecture, and more than 1.8 meters deep in Niigata's Uonuma City.

Tadami Town in Fukushima Prefecture had a record 1.1 meters of snow during the 24 hours through Monday morning. The town's snow accumulation reached nearly 1.6 meters as of 5 p.m. on the day.



Snowflake

Record-breaking snowfall blankets Moscow

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Heavy snowfall descended on the Russian capital on Sunday, disrupting traffic, delaying flights and leaving pavements buried with snow.

In parts of Moscow, snow piled into mounds over 30 centimetres (12 inches) high, something not usually observed until the end of winter in February, the Fobos weather centre said.

The last time a similar depth of snow was recorded in Moscow in mid-December was in 1989 and in 1993, Fobos added.


Fire

Chile heat wave exacerbates forest fires, causes public health risk

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A heat wave that has hit Chile this week with record temperatures in some areas and a lack of rainfall has intensified forest fires that have already burned more than 7,000 hectares (17,000 acres)in the South American nation.

Dozens of people have had to evacuate their homes because of the fires and the capital Santiago is under a public health alert due to a cloud of smoke, officials said on Friday.

The state-owned National Forestry Corporation (Conaf) said firefighters were currently tackling 18 fires concentrated in the country's central regions, as well as a smaller number in the south.


Snowflake

Holy plow! Nearly 30 inches of snow in Finland, Minnesota and 27 in western Duluth after 3-day storm

A Proctor resident uses a snowblower
© Wyatt Buckner / Duluth News Tribune
A Proctor resident uses a snowblower to clear snow in front of his garage on First Avenue on Thursday morning.
An epic, three-day winter storm was winding down Thursday afternoon after leaving more than 2 feet of snow along the North Shore's highest hills, from western Duluth to Silver Bay and Finland.

The National Weather Service in Duluth allowed the blizzard warning for the North Shore to expire but is continuing a winter weather advisory for all of Northeastern Minnesota and Northwestern Wisconsin until 6 p.m.


Only light accumulations are expected in most areas, but snow may linger into Saturday as the massive storm system continues to move slowly up north and east out of the region.

So far it's the eighth largest 48-hour snowstorm on record in Duluth and 14th largest total snowstorm.

After the snow ends, a blast of cold is expected going into the week before Christmas.


Snowflake

Storm produced nearly 6 feet of snow in Alta, Utah - dangerous avalanche conditions exist

The Utah Avalanche Center issued a special
© Utah Avalanche Center
The Utah Avalanche Center issued a special avalanche bulletin for dangerous conditions Friday.
Utah's most recent storm officially brought as much as 71 inches, or just shy of 6 feet, of snow by the Alta lifts between Sunday and Friday mornings, according to updated information from the National Weather Service.

Snowbird Resort added 56 inches, or more than 4½ feet of snow, as well. Many mountains received multiple feet of new snow.


And while multiple days of heavy snow this week may be good for Utah's snowpack, it's creating dangerous conditions for avalanches, even at lower elevations near parking lots and trailheads.

That's according to the Utah Avalanche Center, which issued a special avalanche bulletin for "unusually dangerous avalanche conditions" on Friday. The bulletin applies to slopes facing northwest through east at all elevations, "where triggering avalanches is likely." The advisory remains in place through the weekend.


Snowflake

6 feet of snow hits pocket of Colorado, 12-foot-tall drifts reported elsewhere after 2-day blizzard

Snow drifts near the Interstate 76 Iliff exit on December 16, 2022
© Dakota McGee
Snow drifts near the Interstate 76 Iliff exit on December 16, 2022
Mapping from the National Weather Service shows big totals across the state following a blizzard that hit Colorado this week, between December 12 and 14.

While totals in the range of six to 12 inches were reported in the northeast, wind gusts created massive snow drifts and made travel very difficult. In some cases, drifts up to 12 feet deep were reported.

Meanwhile, the northern and southwest mountains got the deepest snow totals. In a very small pocket of the San Juans, near Silverton, more than 72 inches of snow was reported to have fallen between December 12 at 5 PM and December 14 at 5 PM. Around that tiny pocket, totals of 48 inches or more were reported. Elsewhere, some parts of the northern mountains got more than two feet during the same period.


Ice Cube

Rarely seen 'ice pancakes' form on rivers in Scotland and England

Unusual discs of frozen slush, known as
© Callum Sinclair
Unusual discs of frozen slush, known as "ice pancakes," were recently spotted on the River Bladnoch in Scotland. The rare structures were created by unusually cold temperatures in the U.K.
Dozens of eerily perfect circles of slushy ice, known as "ice pancakes," have been floating on the surface of a Scottish river after temperatures in the U.K. unexpectedly plummeted.

Callum Sinclair, project manager for the Scottish Invasive Species Initiative (SISI), spotted the stunning circular sheets of ice Dec. 9 on the River Bladnoch in Wigtownshire, Scotland. Pictures of the peculiar pancakes taken by Sinclair were shared on the SISI Twitter page on Dec. 13, along with a short video of the icy discs bumping into one another and being washed downstream by fast-moving currents.

"I've seen ice pancakes occasionally before," Sinclair told Live Science in an email. "But these were particularly interesting" because of their perfect shape, he added.


Comment: Another video record :
Pancake ice on the River Exe, Tiverton!

16 December 2022, Tiverton, Devon, UK

Pancake ice is a form of sea ice that consists of round pieces of ice with diameters ranging from 30 centimetres (12 in) to 3 metres (9.8 ft) and thicknesses up to 10 centimetres (3.9 inches), depending on the local conditions. It forms as a result of wave action on slush or ice rind.