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Tue, 11 Aug 2020
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Extreme Temperatures

Snowflake

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: Beijing July snow, gold scarcity & unusual Arctic events

ice age
Summer snow in Beijing shocks the country as the worst flooding in 400 years submerges the central crop growing and grain storage areas, leading to a food crisis inbound.

U.S Mint reduces to almost nothing available sales of gold and silver and the 2nd lowest pressure reading for a cyclonic low in the Arctic ever recorded. The cosmic egg and dragon streamers return.


Sources

Sun

Temperature extremes: Baghdad, Iraq hits 125°F, shattering all-record - Damascus, Syria hits record 114.8

Crushing heatwave setting records in the Middle East

Crushing heatwave setting records in the Middle East
On Wednesday, Baghdad followed up with a temperature of 124 degrees, its second highest temperature on record. On Monday, it had reached 123 degrees.

The crippling heat forced many residents indoors, and street sellers had to seek whatever shade they could find. With the state electricity grid failing, many households were relying on generators to power fridges, fans or air conditioning units, the machines adding a guttural hum to the city's already-noisy streets.

Two protesters were shot dead by security forces Monday during demonstrations over a lack of electricity and basic services amid the heatwave.

In nearby Lebanon, where a nationwide electricity crisis has left much of the country with less than three hours of state-provided power per day, the cost of a generator had doubled, leaving many households to go without.

Weather records expert Maximiliano Herrera tweeted that a location about 30 miles east of Beirut registered Lebanon's highest temperature on record Tuesday, 113.7 degrees (45.4 Celsius), while additional locations in Iraq and Saudi Arabia also set records.

Snowflake Cold

Parts of Sweden shivering through coldest summer since 1962 - Don't tell Greta

Cold Sweden

The MSM doesn't consider record-COLD newsworthy — it runs against their AGW agenda after all, and so needs burying AT ALL COSTS.


July is usually a toasty month in the Scandinavian nation of Sweden. However, as has been the case in its Nordic neighbor Norway, the summer of 2020 has been "significantly colder than normal ... with record-breaking cold temperatures" registered up-and-down the country, reports thelocal.se.

Northern Sweden has not had a July this chilly since 2015, reports Swedish public radio. While most of southern and central Sweden hasn't suffered a colder July since 2004.

"We have simply not had a favorable flow for hot air to find its way up from the continent," explains SMH meteorologist Carolin Wahlberg. "It has been the low pressures that have controlled the weather, which has also given us cooler and more unstable weather."

In addition, and even chillier still, historic July cold has been registered in the towns of Mora, Sveg and Storlien. According to weather institute Storm, and as reported by Swedish newspaper Expressen, these towns are on for their coldest July's since 1962.

Comment: Meanwhile Norway's cities are set for the coldest July since the 1990's.


Snowflake

Snow hung on at Mount Rainier, Washington about 10 days later than a usual summer

The snow is now gone from Paradise Ranger Station
© Mt. Rainier National Park
The snow is now gone from Paradise Ranger Station
The last remnants of winter are finally gone from Paradise Ranger Station with the official "snow melt out" being declared last week on July 21.

The snowpack is considered gone when less than 2 inches of water equivalent snow are observed at the weather station, which sits at 5,400 feet along Mt. Rainier National Park.

The July 21 meltout is later than the typical date of July 11th, though the past 40 years the average meltout date was around July 13th, according to research meteorologist Mark Albright.

The snow has melted out as early as May 24th in 1941 (and it was May 27 in the ultra mild winter of 2015) and as late as August 25th in 1974.

Long range forecasts are trending toward a possible La Nina winter which would give high odds of an above-normal snowpack and that the snow will hang out at Paradise next summer beyond its usual meltout date as well.

Snowflake Cold

Norway's cities set for coldest July since 1990's

Trondheim
© Pau Sayrol/Unsplash
A grey day in Trondheim.
Several Norwegian cities are on course for their lowest average July temperatures since the 1990s.

Inconsistent, grey Norwegian summer weather in recent weeks has not been limited to a single area of the country with a number of areas seeing their chilliest month of July for decades, news agency NTB reports.

Central county Trøndelag and South Norway alike will see continued cold, wet weather towards the end of the month.

"Cold weather from the west has resulted in colder temperatures and variable summer weather across large parts of South Norway in July," MET Norway meteorologist Rannveig Oftedal Eikill told NTB.

Comment: Reuters reports on the record high measured in Norway's Arctic archipelago:
Temperatures at Norway's Svalbard archipelago, about midway between the mainland and the North Pole, hit a record high of 21.7 degrees Celsius on Friday, Norway's Meteorological Institute said.

The Arctic islands are warming faster than almost anywhere on Earth, highlighting risks in other parts of the Arctic from Alaska to Siberia, a Norwegian report said last year.

"A 41-year-old record has been broken in Longyearbyen," the Meteorological Institute said on Twitter.

Between 1700 and 1800 CET (1500-1600 GMT), the temperature measured 21.7 degrees Celsius, 0.4 degrees above the previous record from 1979, it added.

Home to more than 2,000 people, Longyearbyen, the main settlement in Svalbard, is about 1,300 kilometres (800 miles) from the North Pole.

The Norwegian Centre for Climate Studies said last February average temperatures in Svalbard had leapt between three and five degrees Celsius (5.4-9.0 Fahrenheit) since the early 1970s and could rise by a total of 10C (18F) by 2100, if world greenhouse gas emissions keep climbing.

Rising temperatures would thaw the frozen ground underpinning many buildings, roads and airports and could cause more avalanches and landslides, it added.

Two people died in 2015 when an avalanche destroyed 10 houses in Longyearbyen.

A warming climate also threatens Arctic wildlife such as polar bears and seals which depend on the sea ice cover.
See also:


Cloud Precipitation

Highest flooding in Europe for 500 years, historical records show correlation with abnormal cold

As the pictures show, Verkhoyansk was hit by summer snow, which is not unknown but hardly common.

As the pictures show, Verkhoyansk was hit by summer snow, which is not unknown but hardly common.
An international research project coordinated by the Vienna University of Technology (TU Wien), with participation from researchers of the University of Barcelona, shows for the first time that flood pattern over the last decades in Europe have changed compared to past centuries.

The study, published in the journal Nature, concludes we are in one of the most flood-rich periods in Europe from the last five hundred years.

The study shows that, within the last half of the millennium, the last three decades are among the most important periods regarding frequency and magnitude of floods in Europe. Also, during these three decades, distribution of the floods have changed, as well as the temperature of the air and flood seasonality, with a higher percentage of floods in summer. Regarding the temperature of the air, from 1500 to 1900, floods used to take place with higher frequency during cold climate phases, while after 1990, floods increased within the context of global warming.


Comment: It would appear the 500 year old pattern still stands, because the evidence shows that our planet is now seriously cooling: Antarctica's coldest March temperature on record - a 'global warming' destroying -75.3℃/-103.5℉


The data analysis identified nine periods of floods that were more abundant and the associated regions. Among the most notable periods are 1560-1580 (western and central Europe), 1760-1800 (most part of Europe), 1840-1870 (western and southern Europe), and 1990-2016 (western and central Europe). According to the analysis, the current phase is the third most severe regarding floods. However, this data is at the expense of the duration of the current phase of abundant floods, to be concluded. Now, floods cause annual damages accounting for more than 100,000 million euros, and the general tendency of abundant floods is increasing.

Comment: ,
If the earth changes we're seeing today are anything to go by, it's likely that these shifts to extremes in weather occur across the planet, not just in Europe, as per the study above: Also check out SOTT radio's: As well as SOTT's monthly documentary SOTT Earth Changes Summary - June 2020: Extreme Weather, Planetary Upheaval, Meteor Fireballs:




Snowflake Cold

Argentine Patagonia provinces under a blanket of snow up to a metre deep

A blanket of snow is covering Patagonia provinces restricting vehicle circulation and has even brought down several high tension power towers

A blanket of snow is covering Patagonia provinces restricting vehicle circulation and has even brought down several high tension power towers
Continuous snowfalls have blanketed Argentine Patagonia provinces together with extremely low temperatures, in what is considered the worst winter since the nineties, according to the Argentinean Meteorological System. The meter-high snow is threatening agriculture, livestock and has interrupted traffic.

"This is an atypical winter with great snow storms. Since the nineties there was a tendency to lesser snow precipitation but this year climate conditions have even caused snow falls in certain areas of Patagonia, unaccustomed to such extremes", according to weather experts.

Temperatures have been much lower than normally and have remained below zero for several days running which contributed to an extreme wind factor. Some of these "persistent snowfalls" in the provinces of Rio Negro, Chubut and Neuquen forced the meteorological office to release warnings for this Patagonian region plus central Mendoza and the southern tip of the Buenos Aires province.


Better Earth

Birds in Finland breeding earlier and having shorter breeding seasons

Common Crossbill
© Jon Evans
Common Crossbill
A team of researchers from Finland and the U.S. has found that boreal birds in Finland have been starting their breeding seasons earlier and have also been shortening their breeding seasons as temperatures in Finland increase due to global warming. In their paper published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the group describes their analysis of data from multiple studies to learn more about how birds are adapting to climate change and what they learned from it.

As the planet continues to warm due to manmade greenhouse gas emissions, researchers around the world continue to study how plants and animals are adapting to the changes. In this new effort, the researchers wondered how boreal birds (those that live south of the Arctic Circle) are faring as temperatures in Finland have been rising.

Comment: That a shift is occurring on our planet is evident throughout nature, however while spring appears to be starting earlier in some areas, winter is too, and, overall, Earth is showing signs of serious cooling: Also check out SOTT radio's:


Attention

Climate propaganda no longer needed

A few months ago, climate change was the most important thing in the world.
Fake Climate News
© Real Climate Science

Info

Adapt 2030 Ice Age Report: When systems break down people and commerce migrate

port
Sugarcane stalks freeze in South Africa with unusual cold, Brazil buys 370% more soybeans from Paraguay than last year and Florida planning new highways to the rural countryside as city residents flee to farms but still need inter-connectivity. The exodus is beginning.