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Fri, 07 Oct 2022
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More spring snow confirmed in parts of South Africa

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© Sandra Mountain Shadows Hotel
Just LOOK! More SNOW has been confirmed in parts of South Africa by Tuesday morning. And MORE snow is expected.

LOOK AT THESE PHOTOS AND MORE SNOW IS EXPECTED ON TUESDAY

Snow was confirmed on Monday evening along the Barkly Pass R58 between Barkly East and Elliot in the Eastern Cape.


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Storm delivers 4 inches of early snow to Mount Shasta, California

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© Mount Shasta Avalanche Center
The early-season storm that soaked Northern California on Sunday also brought some much-needed snowfall to the region's high-elevation areas. Lassen Volcanic National Park received a nice coat of new snow, temporarily closing the park's highway. Now, Monday morning photos of Mount Shasta are surfacing with the mountain already looking in early-winter form.

The Shasta Avalanche Center reported 4 inches of new snow at the Old Ski Bowl and shared photos of the region covered in that white goodness (flip through the photos for the full effect):

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Australian ski resorts hit with over 2 feet of spring snow during storm

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While we begin to shift our focus in North America toward ski season, the winter in the Southern Hemisphere isn't quite over yet. Over the weekend, Australian ski resorts saw some major snow storms that grew their base depths.

Here are the recent snow totals from Australia's most famous ski resorts: Perisher Resort has received 65 c.m. (around 25.6 inches) of powder, Hotham Alpine Resort got 63 c.m. (nearly 25 inches) of snow, Thredbo received 53 c.m.(around 21 inches) of the white stuff, and Falls Creek got 52 c.m. (20.5 inches) of snow.


Snowflake Cold

From heat record to cold record - Arctic winds send temperatures in Europe plummeting

La Capanna Regina Margherita (Queen Margherita’s Hut) at Monte Rosa, which sleeps 70 and also houses a meteorological station,
© Italian Alpine Club
La Capanna Regina Margherita (Queen Margherita’s Hut) at Monte Rosa, which sleeps 70 and also houses a meteorological station.
Two new records were broken at the weekend as temperatures at the weather station at Capanna Margherita in Monte Rosa, Italy, dropped to -6.2°F (-21.2°C) at 6 am on September 17. This breaks the previous coldest temperature measured for the day in 2013, which was -3.5°F (-19.7°C) on September 17, 2013. It also is the earliest temperatures have dropped below -4°F (-20°C) degrees in a season. The previous marker for breaking the -4°F (-20°C) barrier was set on September 24, 2004, a week later.

The following night temperatures dropped even lower to a minimum of -7.6°F (-22°C), which did not break any records but matched the previous monthly record for September, which was set on September 26, 2020. The lowest temperature ever registered at the Margherita Hut weather station was -40.5°F (41°C) in the winter of 1928 - 1929.

Comment: Snow in September after temperatures drop to -2C in Scotland


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Season's first snowfall in Uttarakhand, India - up to 14 inches

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The mood of the weather changed in Uttarakhand on Saturday and the first snowfall of the season occurred. Apart from Badrinath Dham and Hemkunt Sahib, there has been snowfall on the peaks of Pithoragarh Dharchula. The Darma Valley of Pithoragarh, the last outpost of the China border, has received about 14 inches of snow and more than a foot of snowfall in the mountains.

In almost all the plains and hilly areas of the state, the rain continued intermittently and at some places it was cloudy. On the other hand, the Kedarnath Yatra was done smoothly on Saturday. By 8 o'clock in the morning, 5780 devotees left for the Dham from Sonprayag. Intermittent rain continues in the surrounding areas including the capital Dehradun.


Snowflake Cold

Snow in September after temperatures drop to -2C in Scotland

First snow in the Cairngorms.

First snow in the Cairngorms.
Britain has seen its first snow of the season as temperatures fell across the country.

A dusting was said to have settled on the High Cairngorms mountain range on Friday morning with patches reported on the mountains of Ben Macdui and Braeriach in the eastern highlands.

After a summer of heatwaves many snow patches in Scotland have melted away. In previous years long lying snow patches can persist all summer and sometimes have even lasted through to the next winter.

Snowy weather is historically unlikely in Cairngorm in the middle of September but on average there are three days during this week each year when it rains. It was a jet stream of cool air ran over

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Heavy September snowfall in the Alps & Dolomites

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Ski areas across the Alps and Dolomites have been reporting fresh snowfall this morning, Saturday 17th, September.

The snowfall is particularly welcome after a long dry summer that saw record hot temperatures thaw the snow cover from glacial ice, closing summer ski centres.

Only Hintertux in the Austrian Tirol had managed to stay open through the past six weeks, but it was joined on Saturday by Italy's Val Senales opening for its 22-23 season and several more glacier areas plan to open in the next week.


Snowflake Cold

"Winter bared its teeth and beauty" on Mount Washington, New Hampshire

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It's beginning to look a lot like winter atop New England's highest peak.

The Mount Washington Observatory on Thursday shared photos of an icy scene, with rime ice clinging to different structures at the summit.

"Winter bared its teeth and beauty this morning behind a strong cold front," the Observatory posted to social media.


Info

Scientists shine light on 66-million-year-old meteorite wildfire mystery

Impact Study
© compiled by Vellekoop et al
(A) location map of the study area. (B) paleogeographic reconstruction of Gulf of Mexico and Baja California Pacific margin taken from Stéphan et al, and Helenes & Carreño, with location of this study, Chicxulub crater, and impact-related slumps, faults, slides, and tsunami deposits.
The meteorite that wiped out Earth's dinosaurs instantly ignited forest wildfires up to thousands of kilometres from its impact zone, scientists have discovered.

The six-mile-wide meteorite struck the Yucatan peninsula in what is now Mexico at the end of the Cretaceous Period 66 million years ago, triggering a mass extinction that killed off more than 75 percent of living species.

Uncertainty and debate have surrounded the circumstances behind the devastating wildfires known to have been caused by the strike, with several theories as to how and when they started, and their full extent.

By analysing rocks dating to the time of the strike, a team of geoscientists from the UK, Mexico and Brazil has recently discovered that some of the fires broke out within minutes, at most, of the impact, in areas stretching up to 2500km or more from the impact crater.

Wildfires that broke out in coastal areas were short-lived, as the backwash from the mega-tsunami caused by the impact swept charred trees offshore.

Info

Artificial ocean cooling to weaken hurricanes is futile, study finds

Researchers suggest ocean cooling is an effectively impossible solution to mitigate disasters.
Atlantic Ocean from Space

A new study found that even if we did have the infinite power to artificially cool enough of the oceans to weaken a hurricane, the benefits would be minimal. The study led by scientists at the University of Miami (UM) Rosenstiel School of Marine, Atmospheric and Earth Science showed that the energy alone that is needed to use intervention technology to weaken a hurricane before landfall makes it a highly inefficient solution to mitigate disasters.

"The main result from our study is that massive amounts of artificially cooled water would be needed for only a modest weakening in hurricane intensity before landfall," said the study's lead author James Hlywiak, a graduate of the UM Rosenstiel School. "Plus, weakening the intensity by marginal amounts doesn't necessarily mean that the likelihood for inland damages and safety risks would decrease as well. While any amount of weakening before landfall is a good thing, for these reasons it makes more sense to direct focus towards adaptation strategies such as reinforcing infrastructure, improving the efficiency of evacuation procedures, and advancing the science around detection and prediction of impending storms."

To scientifically answer questions about the effectiveness of artificially cooling the ocean to weaken hurricanes, the authors used a combination of air-sea interaction theories and a highly sophisticated computer model of the atmosphere.