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Sat, 16 Nov 2019
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Alarm Clock

Understanding Your Circadian Rhythm and Body Clock

clock
You may imagine your body clock works to wake you up at the same time each day. True, many people can set their body clocks to wake at a specific time, with a bit of practice that is! However, there's a lot more to the body clock and circadian rhythm than that.

In fact, the body clock and circadian rhythm pretty much determine the quality of your sleep. That means that if your body clock is out of sync, you may suffer sleep disturbances. But there are ways to reset your circadian rhythm.

In this article, we take an in-depth look at the body clock and circadian rhythm, providing a definition and outlining their function and role. Furthermore, you'll find out about body clock irregularities and how to reset your circadian rhythm to get a better night's sleep. All in all, you'll get a detailed insight into all aspects of your body clock and circadian rhythm. Their impact on your overall health is significant, so read on and learn more!

Cow

Red meat 'most perfect food' for humans, closely followed by milk

steak dinner
Professor Robert Pickard, emeritus professor of neurobiology at Cardiff University, said the agricultural industry had been 'the butt of an enormous journalistic effort to sell copy by producing totally indefensible headlines' about red meat causing cancer.

Prof Pickard also hit out at the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) report which claimed processed meats 'definitely' cause cancer and lean red meat 'probably' causes cancer.

Speaking at NFU Cymru's annual conference in Llandrindod Wells last week (November 7), he said: "There is not a single proven case of eating red meat or processed meat actually causing a cancer.

Comment: Only through the repeated brainwashing techniques of the mainstream media could people actually ignore what their body intuitively knows - red meat is good for you.

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SOTT Logo Radio

Objective:Health: #36 - ITN - Aborted Babies in Vaccines | Childhood Obesity | Red Meat Studies

O:H header
It's time again for another of our 'In the News' (ITN) shows, where the Objective:Health hosts weigh in on some of the headlines showing up in our feeds in the world of health.

We cover a lot this week: A new study showing children who live closer to fast food joints are more likely to be obese (duh); genetic testing shows many vaccines contain aborted fetal cells; Tylenol taken by pregnant women may cause autism, ADHD or other developmental issues; chemicals in consumer products lead to kids with lower IQs; a not-in-the-least-bit shocking study finds previous studies showing red meat is bad for you were all really crappy studies; and finally, Scientific American, the mainstream of the mainstream science publications, actually publishes an article suggesting 5G may not be safe.

Join us for our hot, and not so hot, takes on the latest in health news.


And check us out on Brighteon!


For other health-related news and more, you can find us on:

♥Twitter: https://twitter.com/objecthealth
♥Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/objecthealth/

And you can check out all of our previous shows (pre YouTube) here.

Running Time: 01:02:55

Download: MP3 — 57.2 MB


Arrow Down

Virginia doctor allegedly tied women's fallopian tubes, performed hysterectomies without consent, federal investigators say

Doctor's office
© Google Map Street View
The office of Dr. Javaid Perwaiz in Chesapeake, Va.
Federal prosecutors have accused a Virginia doctor of performing surgeries on women -- such as hysterectomies and removing their fallopian tubes without their consent according to court documents.

Javaid Perwaiz, 69, faces several charges related to insurance fraud as a result of an investigation that began in September 2018 after the FBI received a tip from a hospital employee who suspected he was "performing unnecessary surgeries on unsuspecting patients," according to the criminal complaint, filed Friday in the Eastern District of Virginia.

The unidentified patients would advise hospital staff that they were there for their "annual clean outs" and were not aware of the procedures they were undergoing, the affidavit states. In addition, hospital staff "had a difficult time" keeping up with the doctor "as he ran from procedure to procedure," charging documents say.

Perwaiz has a practice in Chesapeake, where he lives, according to the court documents.

A preliminary review of Medicaid claims from his patients revealed that certain patients were subjected to repeated surgical procedures, with some occurring on an annual basis, the affidavit states. From January 2014 to August 2018, Perwaiz allegedly performed surgery on 40% of his Medicaid beneficiaries, which amounted to 510 patients. About 42% of those patients underwent two or more surgeries, according to the court documents.

Bacon n Eggs

New study: low-carb education in a group setting for the win

low carb breakfast
© Getty Images
Carbohydrate restriction for diabetes has received a lot of attention over the past year, including the landmark American Diabetes Association consensus report endorsing it as the most effective option for blood sugar management.

We also saw impressive two-year study results from Virta Health showing that people with type 2 diabetes who received low-carb education and support achieved greater improvements in blood sugar control, weight loss, and heart disease risk factors than those who received standard diabetes care. These results confirmed that a carb-restricted approach is beneficial and sustainable long term.

Some may wonder whether the success of the low-carb participants was due in part to the continuous nutrition and medical support they received from the Virta Health team, compared to the limited interaction the standard care group had with their own diabetes team.

Comment: Many who find success in dietary interventions, particularly low carb, Paleo or carnivore interventions, find belonging to a digital community such as a Facebook group, can make all the difference in their success. Being held accountable is one aspect, but simply communicating about ones struggles, basking in other's success stories and forming community bonds is, no doubt, also quite helpful.

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Health

Australian company creates virus that can kill every type of cancer

tumor removal surgery
© PA
Cancer is an awful thing that no one should have to endure; but, sadly, millions do every year.

However, we could be a step closer to ensuring no one else has to die from the myriad of cancers that plague the human body.

An Australian company has developed a virus that has been found to kill every type of cancer.

Comment: As bizarre as it sounds, scientists have been experimenting with the therapeutic use of viruses in combating cancer for some time now. It provides a new hope for treatment for the increasingly prevalent disease.

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Alarm Clock

Some neurologists want to end daylight saving time, calling it unhealthy

colgate clock
© Gary Hershorn/Getty
The moon sets behind the Colgate Clock at sunrise on March 24, 2019 in Jersey City, New Jersey. The United States re-entered standard time on November 3, a transition some health professionals believe causes adverse health effects.
Daylight saving time (DST) officially ended in the United States at 2 a.m. on November 3, but three neurologists at Vanderbilt University say that the practice should be totally done away with permanently.

Drs. Beth A. Malow, Olivia J. Veatch and Kanika Bagai collaborated on a piece published in JAMA Neurology on Monday that brought evidence of the detrimental effects of DST on the brain, citing specifically the negative impact it may have on circadian rhythms, the internal clock that regulates the body's sleep-wake cycle.

They wrote that the transition to and from daylight saving time has been associated with several health complications, including an increased risk of stroke.

Comment: Daylight savings time was a silly idea in the first place. The fact that more and more science is uncovering its actual detrimental effect on our health, it's difficult to come up with reasons to keep it. Time to put this practice to bed.

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Bandaid

Sally Norton: The damaging effects of oxalates on the human body

spinach
Sally Norton,1 who has studied nutrition and has a graduate degree in public health, is one of the leading experts on oxalate poisoning — a topic you don't hear much about. Chances are you may never have heard about oxalates, or have any idea why they might matter.

As is often the case with experts in any health field, her expertise is an outgrowth of her personal struggles with health problems that didn't respond to more conventional treatments, including healthy living (Norton was a vegetarian for 16 years).

Comment: See also:


Brain

New evidence of neuroplasticity: Human brain can rewire itself after traumatic bodily injury

iron man big brain
Fans of the blockbuster movie "Iron Man 3" might remember the characters step inside the digital projection of a "big brain" and watch as groups of neurons are "lit up" along the brain's neural "map" in response to physical touch. Now, much like that scene, researchers at the University of Missouri have discovered a new insight into how the complex neural map of the human brain operates. Similar findings have been previously reported in animal studies, but this is one of the first studies where such a result has been documented in people.

"When a person touches something with their right hand, a specific 'hand area' in the left side of the brain lights up," said Scott Frey, the Miller Family Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience in the Department of Psychological Sciences. "A similar, but opposite reaction happens with the left hand. But when someone loses a hand, we found both 'hand areas' of the brain — left and right — become dedicated to the remaining healthy hand. This is a striking example of functional reorganization or the plasticity of the human brain."

Ambulance

Obesity Week 2019: Why is it so hard for doctors to admit their failure?

doctor vegetables
It's Thursday night, and I'm sitting in an airplane, about to take off for New York. I'm heading home from Las Vegas after attending Obesity Week 2019, the world's largest obesity medicine conference, a collaboration between The Obesity Society and The American Society of Metabolic and Bariatric Surgeons.

I don't quite know how to express my feelings and thoughts about this event, but the words 'anger' and 'hopelessness' immediately come to mind. My anger and hopelessness are best exemplified by the first keynote speech, delivered by Dr. William Cefalu, who is chief scientific and medical officer of the American Diabetes Association.

After accurately describing our country's spiralling healthcare costs, and the morbidity and mortality associated with diabetes and obesity, Dr. Cefalu went on to discuss the benefit of low-calorie approaches for diabetes reversal. He also highlighted bariatric surgery and medications. But ultimately, he harped on one point, that is frequently repeated at conventional obesity medicine conferences:

"There is no best diet. The best diet is one that a patient can adhere to."

Comment: One can understand the frustration of doctors who understand the situation clearly coming up against the majority of their colleagues recommending the status quo to their patients (and the world). It's an uphill battle, but every person who takes the reins and makes changes towards their own health is a small victory.

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