Health & WellnessS


Biohazard

Significant botulism contamination incident in Russia results in 369 people hospitalised, 1 dead, in just 1 week

Botulism Toxin
© James Cavallini/Science SourceThe botulism toxin comes from Clostridium botulinum bacteria, seen here in a colorized micrograph.
A widespread botulism outbreak in Russia has left one person dead and scores hospitalized after consuming contaminated readymade salads, according to authorities.

Botulism is a rare but severe illness caused by a toxin produced by Clostridium botulinum bacteria. The toxin can lead to paralysis, breathing difficulties, and death. Common sources include improperly canned, preserved, or fermented foods. Symptoms of botulism include severe abdominal pain, vomiting, diarrhea, blurred vision, dry mouth, difficulty swallowing or speaking, and neurological issues.

Over 300 people have been hospitalized in this significant outbreak. By comparison, the U.S. records about 110 botulism cases annually, and the European Union recorded only 82 cases in 2021, according to the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control.


Comment: Which makes this a rather significant outbreak.


Comment: Contamination and poisoning incidents seem to be in the news more frequently in the past few years, and they're often associated with prepared salads that were washed in contaminated water. This is of particular note in the West where pollution limits in waterways have been so corrupted that it seems inevitable that, there, these kinds of incidents will surge:


Biohazard

Potential botulism sparks coffee recall: What consumers need to know

botulism
© Dr. Gilda Jones/US Centers for Disease Control and PreventionThis photomicrograph reveals the presence of numerous clostridium bacteria.
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) posted a recall by Snapchill LLC of more than 100 coffee products over concerns that they might contain a potentially deadly toxin.

Snapchill said via the FDA announcement earlier this month that it is recalling dozens of its products because "its current process could lead to the growth and production of the deadly toxin in low acid canned foods."

The coffee products were produced by Snapchill, based in Green Bay, Wisconsin, but they can be sold under different coffee roaster names.

The products include a variety of metal can sizes ranging from seven ounces to 12 ounces, according to the notice. They will have the note, "Produced and distributed by Snapchill LLC" under the nutrition facts panel, or "Snapchill Coffee" on the label.

Evil Rays

Autism and ADHD rates explode, Public Health™ establishment shrugs

autism vaccines
The statistics tell the story: if you live in America in 2024, chances are you know someone with a kid who has been diagnosed with ADHD and/or autism. They're also likely to be prescribed heavy-duty pharmaceutical drugs like Adderall to cope.

Via Statista (emphasis added):
"According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the prevalence of autism among U.S. children has risen significantly in recent years. While 6.7 in 1,000 children were diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) in 2000, that number had risen to 27.6 in 1,000 children by 2020. This means that currently 1 in 36 children in the U.S. get diagnosed with ASD, up from 1 in 150 children 20 years ago.

The reasons for this increase in prevalence are not fully understood and likely complex. Some possible factors that have been proposed include better awareness and screening for autism, changes in diagnostic criteria and environmental or genetic factors. Regardless of the reasons, this rise in the number of children with autism highlights the importance of early identification and intervention to help children with ASD reach their full potential."
Acolytes of The Science™ will simply claim over and over that the reason there appears to be more autism at an ever-increasing clip is that doctors are just getting better at diagnosing it.

The reason, for instance, they´ll claim, that autism is virtually non-existent in populations that pass on vaccines for kids and all other manner of modern pharmaceutical interventions, like the Amish, is that their autism simply isn't diagnosed properly.

Comment: See also:


Calendar

'Outbreak' of West Nile Fever reported in Israel, 7 hospitalized in Tel Aviv

Mosquitoes
© David Zalubowski/APIllustrative: Mosquitoes cling to the inside of a jar loaded with repellent during a test as part of a tour of the Centers for Disease Control laboratory, April 4, 2024, in Fort Collins, Colorado.
Seven people recently hospitalized in the Tel Aviv area were found to be infected with West Nile fever, a disease spread by mosquitos that can be fatal.

Five of the patients were treated at the Ichilov Hospital in Tel Aviv and were apparently infected in northern areas of the city, according to Hebrew media reports on Monday. Two are still in serious condition.

Channel 12 reported that another two patients were recently hospitalized at the Sheba Medical Center, in Ramat Gan near Tel Aviv, but have since been discharged.

Comment: It remains to be seen just what impact the outbreak will have, but with the vast majority of Israelis having received an mRNA covid jab, and the accumulative damage that can do to the immune system, they are certainly more vulnerable than ever before:


Syringe

If covid vaccines saved 20 million lives, why did so few unvaccinated die in winter 2021?

vaccine
© Unknown
Despite the 'pandemic response' being a non-issue in the General Election (all parties were compliant and consequently complicit in the single most disastrous policy ever followed by any Government) the issue of vaccine harms hasn't entirely gone away. A paper published in the BMJ Public Health journal and covered in a front page piece by Sarah Knapton in the Telegraph gave the issue much needed credence. This was followed by David Davis MP repeating a call for a proper inquiry into excess deaths and a post from Carl Heneghan and Tom Jefferson, published on their Substack Trust the Evidence and reprinted in the Daily Sceptic.

Heneghan and Jefferson state:
Suddenly, it's okay to question the vaccine narrative. The Lancet estimated that vaccinations prevented 19·8 million excess deaths. Mathematical modelling should not be used to justify the policy — the latest report shows the numbers don't add up.
Of course, it isn't only the Lancet that has relied on nonsensical mathematical modelling to justify widespread adoption of mRNA technology. Disappointingly, both Rod Liddle and Fraser Nelson in recent articles published in the Times and Telegraph respectively repeated the farcical claim that the AstraZeneca vaccine saved six million lives. Claims that 500,000 lives were saved by lockdown, that 20 million lives were saved by mRNA vaccines or six million were saved by AstraZeneca all rely on modelling. However, we have real-world data that paint a very different picture.

Biohazard

Johnson & Johnson to pay $700 million to 42 states in talc baby powder lawsuit

talcum powder
Johnson & Johnson will pay $700 million to settle a lawsuit by dozens of states that accused the pharmaceutical industry giant of intentionally misleading customers about the safety of its talc-based baby powder, officials announced.

J&J sold products with talc for more than 100 years before discontinuing them globally in 2023 after facing thousands of lawsuits. The coalition of 43 attorneys general found Johnson & Johnson failed to disclose that the talc sometimes contained asbestos and that asbestos is harmful and can lead to cancer.

Johnson & Johnson baby powder is now largely made from corn starch rather than talc. The company did not admit guilt as part of the settlement.

Health

Dozens of hikers became ill during trips to waterfalls near the Grand Canyon, source of sickness not yet identified

Havasupai reservation
Havasupai reservation
Dozens of hikers say they fell ill during trips to a popular Arizona tourist destination that features towering blue-green waterfalls deep in a gorge neighboring Grand Canyon National Park.

Madelyn Melchiors, a 32-year-old veterinarian from Kingman, Arizona, said she was vomiting severely Monday evening and had a fever that endured for days after camping on the Havasupai reservation.

She eventually hiked out to her car in a weakened state through stiflingly hot weather and was thankful a mule transported her pack several miles up a winding trail, she said.

"I said, 'If someone can just pack out my 30-pound pack, I think I can just limp along,'" said Melchiors, an experienced and regular backpacker. Afterward, "I slept 16 hours and drank a bunch of electrolytes. I'm still not normal, but I will be OK. I'm grateful for that."

Comment: See also:


Caduceus

Doctors are 'raising alarms' over energy drinks linked to sudden heart attacks: report

Energydrink Red Bull
© Nattu/Flickr/CC BY 2.0Energy drink
Energy drinks are known to erode teeth and increase the risks of mental and cardiac health issues, The Post reported. These include attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts in people who consume them.

Health experts are concerned about the risks of drinking energy drinks, linked to sudden heart attack

Energy drinks are the go-to go-go juice for many people looking to battle back fatigue and in need of an energy boost. But recent research suggests consuming these drinks could lead to serious health conditions.

A one-two punch of refined sugar and high caffeine, these bevies are effective at keeping folks alert. But the juice, as they say, may not be worth the squeeze since it can cause heart attacks.

Beer

Her gut was producing alcohol. Doctors didn't believe her

woman holding stomach, stomachache, upset tummy
© LaylaBird/E+/Getty ImagesAuto-brewery syndrome is an extremely rare condition in which bacteria and fungus in the gastrointestinal tract turn the carbohydrates in everyday food into ethanol.
Her breath reeked of alcohol. She was dizzy, disoriented and weak, so much so that one day she passed out and hit her head on a kitchen counter while making lunch for her school-age children.

Yet not a drop of liquor had passed her lips, a fact that the 50-year-old Toronto woman and her husband told doctors for two years before someone actually believed her.

"She visited her family doctor again and again and went to the emergency room seven times over two years," said Dr. Rahel Zewude, an infectious disease specialist at the University of Toronto.

Doctors found the woman's alcohol levels could range between 30 millimoles per liter and 62 millimoles per liter — below 2 millimoles per liter is normal, Zewude said.

Alcohol levels of up to 62 millimoles per liter are extraordinarily high and would be considered life-threatening, even fatal, said Barbara Cordell, president of an advocacy association called Auto-Brewery Syndrome Information and Research, which provides patient education and does research on the unusual condition.

Health

First-ever case of ringworm as an STD reported, doctors warn it's highly contagious

ring worm
Symptoms of ringworm typically appear within four to 14 days after exposure and include an itchy rash that is circular in appearance, as well as redness, flakiness, peeling or cracking of the skin
Doctors are sounding the alarm over the spread of a highly contagious rare fungal infection that spreads through sex — after treating a man who developed a rash on his penis, thighs and buttocks.

The New York patient is the first documented case of the fungus being passed through sexual contact.

The infection, which is a rare type of ringworm, has been described by the New York University experts as a 'potential public health threat'.

Ringworm — sometimes referred to as 'jock itch' when it affects the groin — is a common mold-like parasite that lives on the body and is spread via contact with an infected person.

Comment: Outbreaks and unusual diseases of various kinds appear to be on the rise since the roll out of the immunocompromising covid jabs, and, with living standards plummeting across the planet, it seems likely that the situation will worsen: