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Wed, 18 Oct 2017
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Alarm Clock

Study shows significant correlations between the use of glyphosate and the rise of chronic disease

It's no secret that we are living in a time where chronic disease continues to rise at an exponential rate, especially within the past couple of decades. New evidence continues to mount suggesting that Genetically Modified Organisms (more specifically GM food) might have played, and do play a key role in those statistics.

A study published in the Journal of Organic Systems last September examined US government databases, researchers searched for GE (Genetically Engineered) crop data, glyphosate application data, and disease epidemiological data while performing a "correlation analysis" on a total of 22 different diseases.

Bell

Middle Eastern gulf states ban glyphosate over 'probable carcinogen' fears

Oman's Ministry of Agriculture has confirmed that six Middle Eastern countries, including Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, the United Arab Emirates, Qatar, Bahrain, and Oman have banned the use of glyphosate herbicides since last year, after reviewing IARC's classification of glyphosate as a 'probable human carcinogen'.

Eng Saleh al Abri, Director General of Agricultural Development in Oman's Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries (MoAF), confirmed to the Muscat Times on Wednesday that, "Glyphosate hasn't been available in Oman since 2016."

Al Abri added, "Roundup has been suspended for use in Oman since IARC (International Agency for Research on Cancer) added the active ingredient (glyphosate) to their list."

Health

Antioxidant compound found in strawberries could reduce cognitive decline and inflammation associated with aging - Study

Salk scientists have found further evidence that a natural compound in strawberries reduces cognitive deficits and inflammation associated with aging in mice. The work, which appeared in the Journals of Gerontology Series A in June 2017, builds on the team's previous research into the antioxidant fisetin, finding it could help treat age-related mental decline and conditions like Alzheimer's or stroke.

"Companies have put fisetin into various health products but there hasn't been enough serious testing of the compound," says Pamela Maher, a senior staff scientist in Salk's Cellular Neurobiology Laboratory and senior author of the paper. "Based on our ongoing work, we think fisetin might be helpful as a preventative for many age-associated neurodegenerative diseases, not just Alzheimer's, and we'd like to encourage more rigorous study of it."

Maher, who works in the lab of David Schubert, the head of Salk's Cellular Neurobiology Lab, has been studying fisetin for over a decade. Previous research by the lab found that fisetin reduced memory loss related to Alzheimer's in mice genetically modified to develop the disease. But that study focused on genetic (familial) AD, which accounts for only 1 to 3 percent of cases. By far the bigger risk factor for developing what is termed sporadic AD, as well as other neurodegenerative disorders, is simply age. For the current inquiry, Maher turned to a strain of laboratory mice that age prematurely to better study sporadic AD. By 10 months of age, these mice typically show signs of physical and cognitive decline not seen in normal mice until two years of age.

Bullseye

No competition in the braces business: Dentists target mail-order orthodontics

© Danny Menendez / BuzzFeed News
Dentists are waging a war against SmileDirectClub, a startup whose mail-order product promises to straighten teeth at a fraction of the cost of braces, without the hassle of a dentist's office.

The American Association of Orthodontists (AAO), representing 18,000 dental professionals, has lodged complaints with dental boards and attorneys general in 36 states, alleging that SmileDirect's service - which allows customers to skip in-person doctor visits and X-rays - is "illegal and creates medical risks."

At least three state dental boards - in Alaska, California, and West Virginia - have opened investigations into the company, though none have yet been completed. In August, Alaska's board voted to ask the state's licensing division to send a cease-and-desist letter barring SmileDirect from selling there.

"It became very clear to us that they were violating the law," Kevin Dillard, general counsel at the AAO, told BuzzFeed News. "Our goal is to make sure that those states understand that there is a market participant here that we believe is violating their laws that exist to protect the public."

People

Nearly 40% of Americans are now obese

© David Gray / Reuters
America's obesity crisis appears more unstoppable than ever.

A troubling new report released Friday by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention shows that almost 40 percent of American adults and nearly 20 percent of adolescents are obese - the highest rates ever recorded for the U.S.

"It's difficult to be optimistic at this point," said Dr. Frank Hu, chair of the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. "The trend of obesity has been steadily increasing in both children and adults despite many public health efforts to improve nutrition and physical activity."

The continued weight increase in the youngest Americans is especially worrisome for long-term health. One in five adolescents, ages 12-19; one in five kids, ages 6-11, and and one in ten preschoolers, ages 2-5 are considered obese, not just overweight.

Horse

Vets warn against extreme horse breeding that leave animals looking like 'cartoons'

© ORRION FARMS
El Rey Magnum
The trend of breeding animals to make them more attractive even when it damages their health has spread to horses, vets are warning, after a stable released images showing a 'cartoon-like' colt.

Extreme breeding practices have already left animals like French bulldogs and pugs struggling to breathe as their faces have become squashed over time to suit human demands.

But vets believe that the worrying practice is now happening in horses after a US stud farm offered an Arabian Colt for sale with an strange concave, or 'dished' profile.

The farm described the horse as a step towards 'perfection', but equine experts warned the animal may find it difficult to breathe and exercise with such a flattened nose.

Health

Flouride: Poison in your tap water

© love, peace and harmony
Today, 74 percent of Americans on community water systems receive fluoridated water.1 Since 1945, it has been widely accepted in the U.S. that fluoride is "safe and effective" to prevent tooth decay. But is it really?

The 2015 documentary, "Fluoride: Poison on Tap," seeks to expose what may be one of the longest-running and most successful deceptions known to mankind - adding industrial waste, in the form of fluoride, to public drinking water. You may be shocked at the lengths to which corporations, industry and government have gone to make this industrial waste product appear beneficial to your health.

Fluoride = Health: How Did We Get Here?

You may be surprised to know the first American commercial use of fluoride, in the form of sodium fluoride, was to kill insects, lice, mice and other vermin. It was quite effective. In the 1930s, aluminum-industry giant Alcoa was the largest producer of fluoride, releasing vapors into the atmosphere that crippled or killed farm animals and scorched crops and other vegetation. In those early years, many lawsuits were brought against Alcoa to recover damages from lost animals and crops.

Growing concerns about the seemingly negative effects of fluoride gas on human beings motivated the company to devise a means of recycling this potent industrial byproduct. The brainchild of water fluoridation was Gerald Cox, a researcher with the Mellon Institute in Pittsburgh. He received a request to look at fluoride's effects on teeth from Alcoa lab director Francis Frary, who was concerned about mounting lawsuits related to the fluoride pollution his plant produced.

Another motivation was the reality that disposing of fluoride waste from its aluminum plants was becoming increasingly costly for Alcoa. Previously, the Mellon Institute had been the leading defender of the asbestos industry, producing research showing asbestos was harmless and worker health problems were purportedly due to other causes. Using "science" as a smokescreen, the Mellon Institute was able to save the asbestos industry from financial catastrophe.

Life Preserver

Pain management crisis: Can we treat it without drugs?

© Daniel Leal-Olivas/AFP/Getty Images
Jamaica's Usain Bolt falls after hurting himself during the final of the men's 4x100m relay athletics event at the 2017 IAAF World Championships at the London Stadium in London on August 12, 2017.
I hear about pain all the time. New students introduce themselves with a list of aches and surgeries; old students inform me they'll be modifying for this or that reason. The factor uniting their issues is pain. They're either trying to avoid it or strengthen and stretch areas of their body to reduce the pain they feel.

Moving through pain is a relatively recent advancement in America, even though other cultures have advised it for centuries. When I broke my femur in 1986, I spent three months in bed, one in traction, two in a full body cast. Nine months of physical therapy followed. To this day I have an imbalance that in many ways shaped my fitness career: to avoid pain. Today doctors treat femur breaks by having patients walk as quickly as possible. Weight bearing is a more reliable method of healing than weight avoidance, even if a bit of pain is necessary along the way.

Pills

Top doctor: We're facing a 'post-antibiotic apocalypse' unless strong action is taken world wide

© Harald Theissen / Global Look Press
England's chief medical officer has warned of a "post-antibiotic apocalypse," calling on world leaders to address the growing threat of drug-resistant infections.

Ahead of a global conference in Berlin organized by the UK government to map out the threat of drug resistance, Professor Dame Sally Davies cautioned against giving patients antibiotics they "don't need," as the drugs will lose their effectiveness and "spell the end of modern medicine."

She warned that the threat of infections posed by antimicrobial resistance (AMR) heightens the risk of carrying out operations such as caesarean sections and hip replacements.

Comment: Why is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation supporting such good advice?

See also:


Brain

One resistance exercise session can boost long-term memory

One single workout with weights can immediately enhance long-term memory by around 20%, according to a new study.

While it's now well-established that months of aerobic exercise can enhance memory, this is the first study examining the effects of a relatively short amount of resistance training.

In the study, people were shown a series of pictures which they were not asked to memorise (Weinberg et al., 2014).

Then half the participants did 50 leg extensions in a gym resistance machine.

The other half sat in the leg extension chair for the same time but did not do the exercise - instead the machine moved their leg for them.

Comment: See also: