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Fri, 17 Nov 2017
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Life Preserver

Scientists reverse Type 1 diabetes in mice with pre-treated blood stem cells

© Andrea Panigada
In type 1 diabetes, autoreactive T-cells (like the one in yellow) attack insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas. What if blood stem cells could be taught to neutralize them?
A team of scientists from Boston Children's Hospital have reversed type 1 diabetes in mice, leading to hopes that human sufferers of the autoimmune condition may soon be treated using a similar method.

Hospital researchers said that all of the mice trialled were successfully cured of type 1 in the short term, while around one-third were cured for the duration of their lives. Previous studies have tried to cure the condition using immunotherapy.

Comment: See also:


Health

Doctors claim to have documented first case of death from marijuana overdose after 11-month old boy dies

© SEASTOCK/GETTY IMAGES/ISTOCKPHOTO
Two Colorado doctors claim they have documented the first case of a person dying from consuming too much marijuana.

Drs. Thomas Nappe and Christopher Hoyte shared their findings in the journal, "Clinical Practice and Cases in Emergency Medicine."

Nappe and Hoyte wrote in their study that the first person to die from a marijuana overdose was an 11-month-old boy.

The child, who died in 2015, was rushed to the emergency room after having a seizure. The boy's guardian told doctors that the child had been retching, was "irritable" and lethargic in the days leading up to his hospitalization.

A team of doctors, which included Hoyte and Nappe, examined the boy for medical conditions but found he was otherwise healthy, KUSA reports.

SOTT Logo Radio

The Health & Wellness Show: Nanny State, Paranoid Parents and the Fragile Generation

© Joanna Andreasson
When the federal government passes a law stating that it's okay for children to walk to school alone, there's a problem with society. All over America, parents have been cited for allowing their children to do what previous generations viewed as normal and even a necessary part of development. Children roaming and playing freely without adult supervision was once the common and expected but it has been replaced with structured activities, endless lessons, play dates and rigorous school testing. Over-involved helicopter parents and nanny state schooling has resulted in a generation of children that are never free from the watchful eye of an authority figure.

How does this effect the individual and what will be the fate of society overrun with a bunch of fragile youngsters who can't make a move on their own or handle the harsh realities of adult life? Join us on this episode of The Health and Wellness Show for a lively discussion of this topic.

And stay tuned for Zoya's Pet Health Segment where we listen to George Carlin talking about the differences between cats and dogs.

Running Time: 01:27:35

Download: OGG, MP3


Listen live, chat, and call in to future shows on the SOTT Radio Network!

Magnify

The connection between probiotics, gut flora and anxiety

Our stomach is a fascinating place. With all the advancements being made in neuroscience, the complexities of digestion have not been well understood, the dark matter of our body's galaxy. That is changing, quickly.

Part of the challenge is complexity: there are 100,000 times more microbes in your gut than humans on this planet, writes Emeran Mayer in The Mind-Gut Connection. There are also more immune cells inside of our stomachs than in blood and bone marrow, which makes what we put into our mouths so important. Our diets might affect our brains more than the other way around. As Mayer puts it,
Your gut microbes are in a prime position to influence your emotions, by generating and modulating signals the gut sends back to the brain.
Humans are collectively experiencing increased rates of anxiety, which is now the planet's most pervasive psychological disorder. Increased stress has numerous destructive tendencies in our guts, including the alteration of contractions, transit rates between our stomach and large intestine, and blood flow. When that blood is transporting extra cortisol due to an increase in our corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF), the result is increased storage of visceral fat, decreased function of our immune system, and, of course, anxiety.

Comment: The relative health of one's gut has a big impact on a number of different bodily functions...


Evil Rays

'Wi-Fi allergy' killed her. UK Mum fights for wireless to be removed from all schools and hospitals

© INS News
Jenny suffered more at school, her mum claimed
A mum who claims a Wi-Fi allergy drove her teenage daughter to suicide is fighting for wireless internet to be removed from every school and hospital in the UK.

Debbie Fry's daughter Jenny was found dead aged 15 in woodland near her home in the Cotswolds, Oxfordshire, in 2015.

Mrs Fry claimed at her daughter's inquest that Jenny's life was made a misery as she had electro-hypersensitivity (EHS).


Pills

FDA chief seeking more regulatory power on kratom; warns about use for treating opioid addiction

Citing 36 deaths, the Food and Drug Administration chief warned consumers Tuesday not to use the herbal supplement kratom to ease opioid withdrawal and announce plans to step its regulatory oversight to combat the opioid epidemic.

The FDA public health advisory on kratom follows the Drug Enforcement Administration's reversal or at least delay of plans to classify kratom as a controlled substance on the same level as heroin and LSD.

FDA commissioner Scott Gottlieb says the FDA plans to work with the DEA to determine how kratom should be classified.

Kratom, a plant grown naturally in countries including Thailand and Malaysia, is widely sold in smoke shops and other locations as a powder that can be used in tea to slow the effects of opioid withdrawal. But it has addictive properties of its own, says a public health advisory related to the FDA's mounting concerns regarding risks associated with the use of kratom.

Comment: For more on kratom, see: And if you're not buying the crocodile tears from the FDA, here's more on what's really driving the opioid epidemic:


Family

Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease increases risk of liver, colorectal, and breast cancers


Journal of Hepatology
Amsterdam, November 14, 2017 - Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is one of the more common chronic liver diseases worldwide. It is associated with metabolic syndrome (i.e. insulin resistance and diabetes) and predisposes to cardiovascular disease. In a new study published in the Journal of Hepatology, researchers identified links not only between NAFLD and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), which have been well established, but also to cancers outside the liver, including colorectal and breast cancer.


Comment: The association with insulin resistance and diabetes is telling: Fatty Liver and Foie Gras: When humans are forced-fed sugar


"NAFLD is a very important multisystem disease to which much attention should be paid," explained lead author Gi-Ae Kim, of the Health Screening and Promotion Center, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan, College of Medicine, Seoul, Republic of Korea. "Despite its strong relationship with HCC development, little attention has been paid to the association of NAFLD with the development of other extrahepatic cancers. Our study presents statistical evidence that NAFLD is associated with extrahepatic cancers. We hope this study will raise awareness of the increased cancer potential that NAFLD might have."

Brain

Exercise increases the size of the hippocampus in humans

Aerobic exercise can improve memory function and maintain brain health as we age, a new Australian-led study has found.

In a first of its kind international collaboration, researchers from Australia's National Institute of Complementary Medicine at Western Sydney University and the Division of Psychology and Mental Health at the University of Manchester in the UK examined the effects of aerobic exercise on a region of the brain called the hippocampus, which is critical for memory and other brain functions.

Brain health decreases with age, with the average brain shrinking by approximately five per cent per decade after the age of 40.

Studies in mice and rats have consistently shown that physical exercise increases the size of the hippocampus but until now evidence in humans has been inconsistent.

Comment: Daily Physical Activity May Reduce Alzheimer's Disease Risk at Any Age


Pills

Drugging the elderly: Almost half of people in UK over 65 are taking at least 5 medications a day

© Joe Raedle
Almost half of over-65s in England are taking at least five different drugs a day, a Cambridge University study has found.

The figure has risen from just 12 per cent 20 years ago, while the proportion taking no pills at all dropped from around 20 per cent in the late 1990s to just seven per cent today.

Researchers tracked more than 15,000 older people who took part in two long-term health studies which began in the 1990s.

Some of those who took part in the long-term investigation said they were on up to 23 tablets every day.

Comment: As can be expected the UK statistics on over medication are mirrored in the US, and extend to any population that is vulnerable and thus unable to protect themselves from the depredations of the medical cartel:


Pills

FDA approves 'smart' schizophrenia pill that can be tracked when ingested

© Creativ Studio Heinemann / Global Look Press
An antipsychotic pill that digitally tracks consumption has been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Abilify MyCite will be used in the treatment of chronic mental conditions and is an upgrade on Abilify, which was approved for patients suffering from schizophrenia in 2002.

According to the FDA, the drug is the first of its kind to be given the greenlight in the US.

The drug device was developed by Japan's Otsuka Pharmaceutical Co and California based firm, Proteus Digital Health, who submitted the smart medicine for approval in the US in May.

In a statement released earlier this year, the companies expressed their belief that the development would help people "better manage their mental illness."


Comment: It sounds like it would help the psychiatric cartel better manage their "non-compliant" patients.


The course of the pill is tracked through an ingestible sensor about the size of a grain of sand, which sends electronic information to a "wearable patch."