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Thu, 12 Dec 2019
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Buyer Beware: GMO Stevia is everywhere

stevia
Stevia (Stevia rebaudiana), a perennial shrub native to South America, has a long history of use as a natural sweetener for food, medicines and beverages.1 Whole stevia contains a number of substances, including various stevioside compounds, rebaudiosides and glycoside.

Steviol glycosides, including rebaudioside A, rebaudioside D and rebaudioside M (Reb A, Reb D, Reb M respectively), are what provide the sweet taste, with Reb A being the sweetest.2 In its isolated, purified form, Reb A is 250 to 400 times sweeter than sugar.

Despite hundreds of years of safe use of stevia, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has labeled stevia leaf and crude stevia extracts "unsafe food additives,"3 granting GRAS (generally recognized as safe) status to certain high-purity steviol glycosides only.4

Eye 1

Dr. Google Will See You Now

Dr Goggle

eliasmillerart.com
Authoritarianism has emerged in Silicon Valley. Google no longer helps you find what you are truly looking for. Instead, they now customize results to satisfy their wants and needs. Individual results might vary

Google's audacious tyranny, which includes censorship, surveillance, and mind control, is accelerating at a wicked clip. It's hard to keep up. The planet's leading search engine is stealthily infiltrating areas/sectors of our society, including elections, news, finances, health, not to mention your mind, all the while 'vacuuming' and usurping data, to become a megalithic repository.

Health

Hepatitis A outbreak linked to blackberries spreads to 6 states: CDC

blackberries
© Shutterstock
A hepatitis A outbreak linked to fresh blackberries sold at Fresh Thyme Farmers Market stores has now sickened at least 16 people across six states, federal health officials announced this week.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) in November announced the outbreak, which, at the time, affected at least 11 people in three states: Indiana, Nebraska, and Wisconsin.

In an updated notice on Monday, however, officials said residents in Michigan, Minnesota, and Missouri have also been sickened by the outbreak.

Syringe

Vaccine boom, population bust: Study queries the link between HPV vaccine and soaring infertility

man and woman with doctor
A plague is spreading silently across the globe. The young generation in America, the United Kingdom, France, Italy, Japan, Australia — in virtually every western country — is afflicted by rapidly increasing rates of infertility.

This spring, the United States reported its lowest birth rate in 30 years, despite an economic boom. Finland's birth rate plummeted to a low not seen in 150 years. Russian President Vladimir Putin recently introduced a string of reforms aimed at stemming the country's "deep demographic declines." The government of Denmark introduced an ad campaign to encourage couples to "Do it for Denmark" and conceive on vacations, and Poland produced a campaign urging its citizens to "breed like rabbits."

Something — or things — are robbing young women and men of their capacity to procreate and public health admits it doesn't have a clue where to start to fix the emerging priority.

The "population bomb" we were all endlessly warned about by environmentalists failed to blow, and instead, demographers have been trying to raise the alarm about the population implosion crisis unfolding across the West — the graying of societies facing an unprecedented aging demographic in which there will be too few young to support the old. Most often, they blame social factors: young women embracing careers instead of motherhood, men shunning marriage and fatherhood, rising consumerism or couples choosing to delay raising a family until the economy settles. But there is another phenomenon that is rarely mentioned — the growing numbers of young people who are not childless by choice but who are incapable of bearing children.

The Centers for Disease Control reports that more than 12 percent of American women — one in eight — have trouble conceiving and bearing a child. Male fertility is plunging, too, and the trend is global. Something — or things — are robbing young women and men of their capacity to procreate and public health admits it doesn't have a clue where to start to fix the emerging priority. Besides bantering about expanding access to costly and risky artificial reproductive technologies, very little is being done to discern the cause of the rising infertility crisis.

So, earlier this month, when an unprecedented study was released that looked at a database of more than eight million American women and singled out a whopping 25 percent increase in childlessness associated with one ubiquitous drug that young women have been taking for only a decade — in tandem with a marked decline in fecundity — you would have thought there would be significant interest from public health, the medical profession and the media, wouldn't you?

Comment:


Beaker

Institutional Inertia: Is enough being done to protect children from Aluminum toxicity?

aluminum
Aluminum is the most abundant metal in the Earth's crust. For most of human history, aluminum was not bioavailable; however, it became so in the late 1880s when chemists developed and patented the smelting process that helped turned the metal into the fixture of modern life — and the omnipresent "ecotoxin" — that it is today. Roughly 130 years later, it is no exaggeration to say that aluminum has become an active (albeit unhelpful) "participant in human evolution."

Comment: More on the evils of Aluminum:


Health

Medicinal mushrooms cut herpes suffering time in half

mushroom

Reishi mushrooms
The herpes virus afflicts millions of people worldwide, causing painful blister-like sores that are often embarrassing. There is no known cure, and medications have a long list of potential side effects and a "take it forever" prescription. Did you know that there is a clinically proven, natural way to provide relief that is growing right under your feet?

Mushrooms, both wild and cultivated, have been prized for their medicinal value for more than 2,000 years. A staple of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM), Ganoderma lucidum or lingzhi mushroom, commonly called reishi, are among the rarest and most prized of therapeutic, edible fungi.

Deemed by ancient healers as the "mushroom of immortality," reishis are large, dark mushrooms with a shiny, slick surface and "woody" texture, which is unsurprising, considering that they grow on old, hardwood trees. In order to meet culinary and medicinal demands for this valued mushroom, reishis are now actively cultivated in different varieties, using wood chips and logs as growing mediums.

Comment: Combat aging, disease & cancer with Lingzhi mushrooms
Regular consumption of Lingzhi mushrooms can enhance our body's immune system and improve blood circulation, thus improving better health conditions. Generally, Lingzhi is recommended as an adaptogen, immune modulator, and a general tonic. These mushrooms are also used to help treat anxiety, high blood pressure, hepatitis, bronchitis, insomnia, and asthma.



Hardhat

Stress in early life may extend lifespan

Caenorhabditis
© Wikipedia
Caenorhabditis elegans.
University of Michigan researchers have discovered that oxidative stress experienced early in life increases subsequent stress resistance later in life.

Oxidative stress happens when cells produce more oxidants and free radicals than they can deal with. It's part of the aging process, but can also arise from stressful conditions such as exercise and calorie restriction.

Examining a type of roundworm called C. elegans, U-M scientists Ursula Jakob and Daphne Bazopoulou found that worms that produced more oxidants during development lived longer than worms that produced fewer oxidants. Their results are published in the journal Nature.

Researchers have long wondered what determines variability in lifespan, says Jakob, a professor of molecular, cellular and developmental biology. One part of that is genetics: If your parents are long-lived, you have a good chance for living longer as well. Environment is another part.

Comment: We can see this pattern throughout many areas of life, such as in exercise or in childhood development, where stressors can promote growth and resilience, and yet in excess it can lead to disorder and early death, but when completely absent it can lead to underdeveloped or abnormal growth as well as atrophy:


Health

Human breast milk may help babies tell time via circadian signals from mom

breast milk infant baby
© comzeal images/Shutterstock.com
Is a bottle of morning milk at night the equivalent of turning on all the lights at bedtime?
Human breast milk is more than a meal - it's also a clock, providing time-of-day information to infants. The composition of breast milk changes across the day, giving energizing morning milk a different cocktail of ingredients than soothing evening milk. Researchers believe this "chrononutrition" may help program infants' emerging circadian biology, the internal timekeeper that allows babies to distinguish day from night.

What happens, though, when babies drink milk that does not come directly from the breast, but is pumped at different times of day and stored in advance of feeding? Scientists have rarely considered the potential effects of "mistimed" milk on infants' development, but the implications are potentially far-reaching.

As psychologists who study the biology of parenting, we teamed up with Laura Glynn, Caroline Steele and Caroline Bixby to investigate the evidence for breast milk as a timekeeper.

Comment: See also:


Biohazard

Canadian firm launches class-action lawsuit against Bayer

roundup herbicide spraying
Canadian law firm Diamond & Diamond has filed a class-action lawsuit against various makers of Roundup, including Bayer.1 Bayer acquired Monsanto, Roundup's original maker, in 2018 for $63 billion and has been grappling with related lawsuits ever since.

The Canadian class-action suit names more than 60 individuals as plaintiffs, but thousands more may have been affected. The suit alleges that Roundup, which contains glyphosate as an active ingredient, caused serious health problems in the users, including Non-Hodgkin lymphoma, brain cancer and lung cancer.

"These are not minor injuries," Darryl Singer, the head of commercial and civil litigation at Diamond & Diamond, told CBC News. "Of the [plaintiffs] that are living, some of them are not likely to see the end of this lawsuit because they will pass away before that."

Comment: See also:


Marijuana

Study outlines concerns around natural psychoactive substances

New research finds that over a period of 17 years, people in the United States increased their use of natural psychoactive substances, believing them to be safe. This has led to many reports of adverse symptoms in adults and children alike.
kratom
© Getty image
Kratom and other natural psychoactive substances may need tighter regulations.
People have been using natural psychoactive substances for hundrends, or even thousands, of years in traditional medicine and as a part of spiritual practices.

Because these substances come from sources such as plants and mushrooms, many people believe them to be safe to use.

However, because they interfere with biological processes in the central nervous system, they can be a threat to human health. These interferences can also cause euphoria and altered states of consciousness.

For these reasons, many people are now using natural psychoactive substances for recreational purposes.

New research has studied trends in the number of people in the United States who reported adverse reactions as a result of exposure to psychoactive substances during 2000-2017.

The Center for Injury Research and Policy at the Research Institute at Nationwide Children's Hospital in Columbus, OH, collaborated with the Ohio State University College of Medicine, also in Columbus, to conduct this study.

Comment: It's no wonder we see an increase in the use of these substances. The medical establishment has betrayed us way too many times and for way too long, sending people in search of alternative ways to deal with their psychological and physical symptoms. Consider the Opioid Crisis in America, which has made countless money for Big-pharma but has destroyed countless lives.

None of the aforementioned substances, regulated or not, can come close to the destruction caused by pharmaceutical companies. But we also don't imply that these substances are to be taken without due consideration just because they are natural. So are strychnine and ricin!