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Mon, 18 Oct 2021
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Black Cat

Taser stun guns are safe - And pigs can fly!

Taser stun guns issued to police forces across the country have been declared broadly safe, following the largest independent study of injuries inflicted by the weapons.

Syringe

Indonesia woman dies of bird flu, toll up to 87

A 44-year-old Indonesian woman has died of bird flu, taking the country's total death total from the disease to 87, a health ministry official said on Monday.

The woman, from Pekan Baru city on Sumatra island, fell sick after she bought chicken in a market last month, Azizman Saad, head of bird flu management at the hospital where she was treated, told Reuters.

Health

More than 400 Cosmetics on U.S. Shelves Unsafe When Used as Directed

September 26, 2007

Andrew C. von Eschenbach, M.D.
Commissioner of Food and Drugs
U.S. Food and Drug Administration
5600 Fishers Lane
Rockville, MD 20857

Dear Dr. von Eschenbach:

FDA regulators will attend a forum in Brussels this week in which cosmetic industry representatives and international regulators will discuss "ways to remove regulatory obstacles among the regions" and other issues related to cosmetic marketing and safety (FDA 2007a). Environmental Working Group (EWG) is writing to express deep concern that FDA officials are excluding public health, consumer, and environmental organizations from this meeting while allowing the regulated industry to participate.

While such an unbalanced discussion of consumer safety issues is always unacceptable, this exclusion is even more problematic in light of our new analyses of product safety, which reveal that products sold in the U.S. frequently violate industry safety standards and contain ingredients banned in other industrialized countries. Our findings raise fundamental concerns about closed-door industry-regulator meetings that could further weaken international cosmetic policies.

Black Cat

Study Reveals 10 Most Terrible Office Behaviors

A coworker who takes credit for someone else's work or rattles off obnoxious jokes is engaging in one of the top 10 most offensive workplace no-no's, according to survey results released this week.

Syringe

Outrageous: 8 more deaths connected to HPV vaccine

Another eight deaths in just the past few months are being connected to Gardasil, Merck & Co.'s vaccine that targets the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus and is being considered by many states as mandatory for all schoolgirls, according to documents released by Judicial Watch.

There also have been another 1,824 adverse reactions to the drug, bringing the "known total" of such problems to 3,461, according to the public interest group that investigates and prosecutes government corruption.

Wine

Could Cardiovascular Disease Be Controlled Through A Brain Pathway?

A discovery made 25 years ago about how the brain controls blood pressure regulation is only now being explored with the help of scientists from the Howard Florey Institute.

German scientist, Prof Wilfrid Jänig, is in Melbourne this month to collaborate with Florey scientists, Dr Robin McAllen and Dr Bradford Bratton, on his research involving a pathway in the brain that controls blood pressure and may worsen cardiovascular disease.

Bulb

Better Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Closer As Scientists Solve Critical Part Of Insulin Puzzle

Scientists are now one step closer to improved treatment of Type 2 diabetes following significant findings made by scientists at Australia's Garvan Institute of Medical Research. World-wide, more than 200 million people suffer from this disease, resulting in disability and reduced life expectancy. In Australia it affects around 7% of the population.

People with Type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, a hormone made in the pancreas that helps convert the sugar in our blood into energy in our muscles. Current therapies force our bodies to make more insulin, make better use of the insulin that already exists or mimic the action of insulin. But none of these therapies specifically address the reasons why insulin production fails in the first place.

Health

Double Cardiovascular Benefit For People With Chronic Kidney Disease

New research by The George Institute for International Health in Sydney, Australia has found that lowering blood pressure protects stroke victims with Chronic Kidney Disease from further strokes or heart attacks. Given the high risk of cardiovascular complications in people with Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD), these results have significant implications for millions of people across the world.

According to lead author, Dr Vlado Perkovic at The George Institute, most of the CKD population will die from cardiovascular complications. "People with Chronic Kidney Disease are at a significantly greater risk of cardiovascular events than those without the disease. We found that approximately twice as many cardiovascular events were prevented when a perindopril based blood pressure lowering regimen was used in these people, compared to people with normal kidney function."

Info

Vaccine not virus responsible for Spanish flu

Ryle Dwyer writes on the horror of the 1918-20 pandemic which the propaganda says was caused by Spanish flu (Irish Examiner, May 1 [2003]).

How did they know it was the virus of Spanish flu that killed millions of civilians and soldiers? This disaster occurred when viruses were unknown to medical science. It took a British science team to identify the first virus in man in 1933.

Bulb

Worm Study Sheds Light On Human Aging, Inherited Diseases

Microscopic worms used for scientific research are living longer despite cellular defects, a discovery that is shedding light on how the human body ages and how doctors could one day limit or reverse genetic mutations that cause inherited diseases, according to a new University of Colorado at Boulder study.

In the first formal study of its kind, researchers manipulated the metabolic state of genetically engineered lab worms called C. elegans and discovered a window of high-efficiency cellular processing that enabled the worms to slow their rate of aging. The findings could one day contribute to the creation of gene therapies to reverse or lessen the effects of mitochondrial diseases, the largest family of human genetic diseases, said lead study author Shane Rea of CU-Boulder's Institute for Behavioral Genetics in Boulder, Colorado.