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Objective:Health - People Power! Pushback Against Vaccine Mandates

O:H header
The news has been sprinkled with stories of late about people pushing back against the tyrannical vaccine mandates that are threatening the liberty of the citizens of planet earth.

A number of lawsuits have been issued by workers banding together in multiple sectors, including LA firefighters, Los Alamos nuclear scientists and airline employees. Protests have erupted in Italy, Switzerland, Germany, France and England. The LA county sheriff has refused to enforce the vaccine mandate, and a judge has ruled New York has to honor religious exemptions.

It's all heating up as it seems at least some of the people have drawn a line they will not cross.

Join us on this episode of Objective:Health as we share a bit of good news (for a change) - People Power!


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https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/16H-nK-N0ANdsA5JFTT12_HU5nUYRVS9YcQh331dG2MI/edit?usp=sharing

Running Time: 00:36:26

Download: MP3 — 33.4 MB


Sherlock

Did Japan's Covid vaccine delay contribute to herd immunity and does it explain the sudden drop in cases?

vaccine japan gambler
© Kyodo News via AP, File
In this Sept. 13, 2021, file photo, a woman receives the first shot of the Moderna COVID-19 vaccine as others wait for their turn in front of pachinko pinball machines at the pachinko parlor Freedom in Osaka, western Japan. Almost overnight, Japan has become a stunning, and somewhat mysterious, coronavirus success story. Case numbers are way down, but experts worry that without knowing how exactly it cut cases so drastically, the nation may be in store for another devastating wave like during the summer.
Almost overnight, Japan has become a stunning, and somewhat mysterious, coronavirus success story.

Daily new COVID-19 cases have plummeted from a mid-August peak of nearly 6,000 in Tokyo, with caseloads in the densely populated capital now routinely below 100, an 11-month low.

The bars are packed, the trains are crowded, and the mood is celebratory, despite a general bafflement over what, exactly, is behind the sharp drop.

Japan, unlike other places in Europe and Asia, has never had anything close to a lockdown, just a series of relatively toothless states of emergency.


Comment: Part of the reason for this is that it's actually against Japan's constitution to lockdown and they can only 'request the public's cooperation'; obviously violating citizens rights didn't stop countries in the West.

Note, this also goes to show that the massively destructive lockdowns enforced across much of the planet were totally unnecessary.


Comment: Despite the eventual 'successful' vaccine roll out compromising people's immune system, it may be that we're still able to detect any benefit that delaying the vaccine roll out had, as well as the numerous negative repercussions that come with them, that we've seen elsewhere in countries that rolled out earlier: And check out SOTT radio's: NewsReal: Is The Government Hyping Shortages? And is 'Vaccination Shedding' Really a Thing?




Syringe

mRNA Inventor on COVID Response: "Is This Really About the Vaccine or Is It About Something Else?"

Covid-19 vaccine
© Ridofranz/iStock/Getty Images Plus
The top federal agencies responsible for public health in the United States, the CDC, and the FDA, are "profoundly corrupt" and are forcefully pushing experimental gene therapeutics, aka COVID vaccines, on the population with "grossly incomplete" data that does not meet even the "minimum standards" for safety. Moreover, the vaccination campaign and the other elements of the COVID policies that have been employed by governments worldwide have little to do with the public health at all. So says mRNA vaccine inventor Robert Malone in an exclusive interview with LifeSiteNews.

Comment: See also:


Health

Lysine therapy interrupts replication of virus

lysine viral replication
© Sott.net
Evidence suggests that lysine, an essential amino acid your body uses in the production of protein,1 may help prevent or treat viral infections.2,3 Virologists have also suggested lysine could help prevent or treat COVID-19.4

In the past months it's become obvious that COVID-19 can no longer be called a major public health threat. The virus is now endemic, in much the way that the seasonal flu or common cold is. Yet, to continue to implement the Great Reset to "build back better," fearmongers need this crisis to continue.

Just as influenza mutates and creates new variants, SARS-CoV-2 will continue to mutate in the environment. Thankfully, as viruses mutate within a population, they also tend to become more benign.5

Comment: See also:




Pills

Nebraska AG: Docs can prescribe controversial COVID drugs ivermectin, hydroxychloroquine without fear of disciplinary action

ivermectin tablets
© NurPhoto via Getty Images
Nebraska's attorney general said Friday that he won't seek disciplinary action against doctors who prescribe controversial, off-label drugs to treat and prevent coronavirus infections, as long as they get informed consent from patients and don't engage in misconduct.

The office of Attorney General Doug Peterson released a legal opinion saying it didn't see data to justify legal action against health care professionals who prescribe ivermectin, a decades-old parasite treatment, or hydroxychloroquine, a malaria drug that former President Donald Trump took to try to prevent a COVID-19 infection.

"Based on the evidence that currently exists, the mere fact of prescribing ivermectin or hydroxychloroquine for COVID-19 will not result in our office filing disciplinary actions," the Republican attorney general said in the opinion.

Comment: See also:


Hotdog

Americans are eating more ultra-processed foods

processed food
Consumption of ultra-processed foods has increased over the past two decades across nearly all segments of the U.S. population, according to a new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health.

"The overall composition of the average U.S. diet has shifted towards a more processed diet. This is concerning, as eating more ultra-processed foods is associated with poor diet quality and higher risk of several chronic diseases," said Filippa Juul, an assistant professor and postdoctoral fellow at NYU School of Public Health and the study's lead author. "The high and increasing consumption of ultra-processed foods in the 21st century may be a key driver of the obesity epidemic."

Ultra-processed foods are industrially manufactured, ready-to-eat or heat, include additives, and are largely devoid of whole foods. Previous studies by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health have found that higher consumption of ultra-processed foods is associated with obesity and heart disease.

Stock Up

WHO: Tuberculosis deaths increased in 2020 for first time in more than a decade

WHO Logo
© Getty Images
Global tuberculosis deaths saw an uptick in 2020 for the first time in more than a decade, a World Health Organization (WHO) report released Thursday found, attributing the rise to the disruption from the COVID-19 pandemic.

WHO documented about 1.5 million tuberculosis deaths last year, including 214,000 among people who were positive for HIV, an increase from 1.4 million tuberculosis deaths in 2019, when 209,000 HIV-positive people died from the disease.

The 5.6 percent increase in fatalities last year represented the first increase since 2005, with WHO predicting tuberculosis cases and deaths will rise "much higher" in 2021 and 2022. Experts expect tuberculosis to have been the second-leading cause of death from a single infectious agent last year, behind COVID-19, after ranking 13th in 2019.

"Far fewer" people received tuberculosis diagnoses and treatments last year, with an 18 percent reduction in diagnoses and a 21 percent decrease in people seeking preventive treatment in 2020.

The international health organization projects that about 4.1 million people currently have tuberculosis without a diagnosis, more than the 2019 prediction that 2.9 million unknowingly suffer from it.

Spending worldwide on tuberculosis diagnosis, treatment and prevention dwindled in 2020 from $5.8 billion to $5.3 billion, which WHO noted is less than half the 2022 target for tuberculosis spending.

Red Pill

Aspirin lowers risk of COVID: New findings support preliminary Israeli trial

israeli hospital
© YONATAN SINDEL/FLASH90
Shaare Zedek hospital team members wearing safety gear work in the Coronavirus ward of Shaare Zedek hospital in Jerusalem on September 23, 2021.
Over-the-counter aspirin could protect the lungs of COVID-19 patients and minimize the need for mechanical ventilation, according to new research at the George Washington University.

The team investigated more than 400 COVID patients from hospitals across the United States who take aspirin unrelated to their COVID disease, and found that the treatment reduced the risk of several parameters by almost half: reaching mechanical ventilation by 44%, ICU admissions by 43%, and overall in-hospital mortality by 47%.

"As we learned about the connection between blood clots and COVID-19, we knew that aspirin - used to prevent stroke and heart attack - could be important for COVID-19 patients," said Dr. Jonathan Chow of the study team. "Our research found an association between low-dose aspirin and decreased severity of COVID-19 and death."

Low-dose aspirin is a common treatment for anyone suffering from blood clotting issues or in danger of stroke, including most people who had a heart attack or a myocardial infarction. Although affecting the respiratory system, the coronavirus has been associated with small blood vessel clotting, causing tiny blockages in the pulmonary blood system, leading to ARDS - acute respiratory distress syndrome.

Comment: Covid-19 is in all likelihood a blood vessel disease, not primarily respiratory, so this makes sense. As for aspirin, it is part of the FLCCC's prevention and early outpatient treatment protocol for COVID-19. Prophylaxis and early treatment are what are needed to beat this virus. And they just happen to be the very things medical authorities are discouraging doctors and the general public from doing, causing needless deaths in the process.

UPDATE: This didn't take long:




Arrow Down

The data is in: We are now worse off than before the experimental jabs

Covid Vaccination
© Nathan Papes/The Springfield News-Leader via AP, File
About 68 percent of adults have received at least one shot of COVID vaccine in the US.
In October 2018, the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health published a report that, if one didn't know better, might make readers think the authors were involved in the gain-of-function research that likely created this virus. The report, titled "Technologies to Address Global Catastrophic Biological Risks," offers novel social control and mRNA vaccination ideas to deal with emerging pandemics "whether naturally emerging or reemerging, deliberately created and released, or laboratory engineered and escaped — that could lead to sudden, extraordinary, widespread disaster beyond the collective capability of national and international organizations and the private sector to control."

One of the many bone-chilling sections in this publication (pp. 45-47) provides a blueprint for "self-spreading vaccines," described as vaccines "genetically engineered to move through populations in the same way as communicable diseases, but rather than causing disease, they confer protection."

Comment:


Igloo

Benefits of sauna and winter-swimming revealed in new study on Scandinavian men

cold therapy water
© Unsplash/CC0 Public Domain
The Scandinavian winter swimming culture combines brief dips in cold water with hot sauna sessions — and now, a study of young men who participate regularly in these polar plunges finds that winter swimming may allow the body to adapt to extreme temperatures. The findings, publishing October 11 in the journal Cell Reports Medicine, suggest that routinely alternating swims or dips in chilly water with sauna sessions might affect how brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), burns energy and produces heat.

"Our data underscore that BAT in adult humans is part of the collective body temperature regulation system in collaboration with skeletal muscle and blood flow," says senior study author Camilla Scheele of the University of Copenhagen. "Regular winter swimming combining cold dips with hot sauna might be a strategy to increase energy expenditure, which could result in weight loss if compensatory increase in food intake can be avoided."

Comment: For more on the many benefits of sauna and cold adaptation, see: Also check out SOTT radio's: