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Thu, 23 Nov 2017
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Book

Excerpts from RFK Jr.'s explosive book on thimerosal in vaccines.

Robert F. Kennedy Jr. has just been selected by President-elect Trump to head a commission that will investigate the issue of "vaccine safety." What this really means is that the era of mercury in vaccines may soon come to an end in America.


Comment: So far, nothing has come of this commission. As of February of this year RFK Jr. claimed it was still in the works.


Donald Trump, as you may already know, is very well informed on the dangers of vaccines. In fact, during the very first presidential debate, the liberal media tried to destroy Donald Trump by claiming he was "anti-vaccine" (thereby implying that vaccines are always good and never cause harm).

Not only did Donald Trump respond by saying he personally knows people whose children were damaged by vaccines, but then Sen. Rand Paul and Ben Carson also chimed in and both agree that vaccines, as currently pushed by government, are far too dangerous.

What makes vaccines so dangerous? A toxic heavy metal known as mercury, for one thing. Astonishingly, it's still used in flu shots given to pregnant women and young children.

Health

Dangerous, expensive and no better than placebo: Are stents a scam?

Angioplasty is a surgical procedure often recommended after an arterial blockage has been found in the heart muscle. Your heart requires a strong oxygen and nutrient supply, like other muscles in your body. There are two major coronary arteries that supply the left and right sides of your heart. By branching into smaller arteries they are able to supply the entire muscle with blood.

The goal of coronary artery angioplasty is to repair or unblock the blocked artery. During the procedure the surgeon inserts a thin expandable balloon that is inflated to flatten the blockage against the arterial wall.1 After the balloon is removed, the surgeon often places a stent with the intention of keeping the artery open and blood flowing freely.

There are currently five types of coronary artery stents available, each with different advantages and disadvantages to placement.2 However, while the different types of stents offer options for those for whom a stent is absolutely necessary, research shows those with stable coronary artery disease, stable angina, do not require stents.


Comment: See also:


Arrow Down

Kidney damage, poor mental health and risky behavior: The dark side of energy drinks

There is emerging evidence that energy drinks can be linked to kidney damage, poor mental health and risk-seeking behaviour, including substance abuse, a according to a new report.

While they cause tooth decay, poor sleep and weight gain, the study published in Frontiers in Public Health said too much research had in the past focused on the effect of caffeine and sugar, instead of the possible harmful effects of other ingredients often found in energy drinks.

The researchers are now calling for governments to bring in laws tackling energy drinks specifically.

"The excess caffeine may contribute to cardiovascular outcomes, such as increased blood pressure," the study's co-author Josiemer Mattei, told Yahoo Lifestyle.

Comment: See also:


Pi

How dad's stress changes his sperm

RNA-packed vesicles that glom on to the germ cells can be altered by a stress hormone, a mouse study suggests
© DENNIS KUNKEL MICROSCOPY/SCIENCE SOURCE
NOT BUNDLES OF JOY Stress may change the genetic contents of sperm by tweaking small packets of RNA in seminal fluid, a study in mice suggests.
Sperm from stressed-out dads can carry that stress from one generation to another. "But one question that really hasn't been addressed is, 'How do dad's experiences actually change his germ cell?'" Jennifer Chan, a neuroendocrinologist at the University of Pennsylvania, said November 13 in Washington, D.C., at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience.

Now, from a study in mice, Chan and her colleagues have some answers, and even hints at ways to stop this stress inheritance.

The researchers focused on the part of the male reproductive tract called the caput epididymis, a place where sperm cells mature. Getting rid of a stress-hormone sensor there called the glucocorticoid receptor stopped the transmission of stress, the researchers found. When faced with an alarming predator odor, offspring of chronically stressed mice dads overproduce the stress hormone corticosterone. But mice dads that lacked this receptor in the epididymis had offspring with normal hormonal responses.

Health

Don't let new blood pressure guidelines raise yours

© Kelly Blair
"Under New Guidelines, Millions More Americans Will Need to Lower Blood Pressure." This is the type of headline that raises my blood pressure to dangerously high levels.

For years, doctors were told to aim for a systolic blood pressure of less than 140. (The first of the two blood pressure numbers.) Then, in 2013, recommendations were relaxed to less than 150 for patients age 60 and older. Now they have been tightened, to less than 130 for anyone with at least a 10 percent risk of heart attack or stroke in the next decade. That means that nearly half of all adults in the United States are now considered to have high blood pressure.

I bet I'm not the only doctor whose blood pressure jumped upon hearing this news. Disclosure: I'm an advocate of less medicine and living a more healthy life, and I worry we get too focused on numbers. But to make that case I'll need to use some numbers.

The new recommendation is principally in response to the results of a large, federally funded study called Sprint that was published in 2015 in The New England Journal of Medicine. Sprint was a high-quality, well-done study. It randomly assigned high blood pressure patients age 50 and older to one of two treatment targets: systolic blood pressure of less than 140 or one of less than 120. The primary finding was that the lower target led to a 25 percent reduction in cardiovascular events - the combined rate of heart attacks, strokes, heart failures and cardiovascular deaths.

Comment: More food for thought:


Chart Pie

Cost of diabetes epidemic reaches $850 billion a year

The number of people living with diabetes has tripled since 2000, pushing the global cost of the disease to $850 billion a year, medical experts said on Tuesday.

The vast majority of those affected have type 2 diabetes, which is linked to obesity and lack of exercise, and the epidemic is spreading particularly fast in poorer countries as people adopt Western diets and urban lifestyles.

The latest estimates from the International Diabetes Federation mean that one in 11 adults worldwide have the condition, which occurs when the amount of sugar in the blood is too high.

The total number of diabetics is now 451 million and is expected to reach 693 million by 2045 if current trends continue.

Comment: And the current trend will get worse as long as the official dietary guidelines will continue to advocate for a high carbohydrate diet for diabetics and the population at large. If diabetics have a carbohydrate intolerance, it stands to reason that they need to reduce the amount of carbs and increase their consumption of healthy fats.


Wine

Destroying your brain one drink at a time: Mouse study finds alcohol kills brain stem cells


The study found that repeated alcohol consumption damages many parts of the brain and the areas most susceptible are in two regions that are responsible for the production of new brain cells.
Without stem cells, new brain cells cannot be produced.

Alcohol kills stem cells in the brain, new research finds.

Stem cells are responsible for making new cells - known as neurogenesis - and are key to maintaining normal cognitive function.

Females are particularly vulnerable to the effects of alcohol, the study on mice found.

Comment:


Health

Autophagy declares the clean bill of a cell's health


Autophagy: How Cells Recycle to Survive
The term "Autophagy", originating from the Greek words "auto" (meaning self) and "phagy" (meaning eat) is the evolutionarily conserved physiological process that maintains the protein turnover within a cell. The mechanism involves the formation of double-membrane vesicles called autophagosomes to encapsulate the misfolded proteins, invading pathogens and other dysfunctional cytoplasmic constituents. These constituents of autophagosome are collectively called as cargo which is delivered into the lysosomal compartment for degradation.

The machinery of autophagy involves around 30 genes which are called autophagy-related (ATG) genes. In order to maintain a continuous protein turnover, a constitutive proteasomal degradation system of proteins exists within the cell. But the system is known to be restricted to short-lived proteins present in the cell. Surprisingly, most of the cellular components are long-lived. Therefore there must be an alternative recycling mechanism for the degradation of these macromolecules to promote adaptation and cell survival under adverse conditions. And autophagy was known to be very promising in playing this alternative role. Besides being responsible for the normal functioning of the protein degradation mechanism, autophagy is also involved in in a variety of biological functions like development, cellular differentiation, defense against pathogens and nutritional starvation.

Biohazard

EPA proves its industry allegiance, refuses to ban neurotoxic Chlorpyrifos pesticide found in 87% of newborns


Chlorpyrifos is an organophosphate insecticide known to disrupt brain development and cause brain damage, neurological abnormalities, reduced IQ and aggressiveness in children.
Exposure to pesticides, herbicides and insecticides has dramatically increased since the introduction of genetically engineered (GE) crops. Urine output of glyphosate, the active ingredient in the herbicide Roundup, shot up by more than 1,200 percent between 1993 and 2016.1 Unfortunately, glyphosate is not the only chemical of concern.

Chlorpyrifos (sold under the trade name Lorsban) - an organophosphate insecticide known to disrupt brain development and cause brain damage, neurological abnormalities, reduced IQ and aggressiveness in children - is another.2 ,3 In adults, the chemical has been linked to Parkinson's disease4,5 and lung cancer.6

Chlorpyrifos has been in use since 1965, and is commonly used on staple crops such as wheat and corn, as well as fruits and vegetables, including nonorganic citrus, apples, cherries, strawberries, broccoli, cauliflower and dozens of others. Since the chemical has a half-life of several months and can remain on sprayed foods for up to several weeks,7 nonorganic foods are a major source of exposure.

Importantly, nonorganic, non-grass fed meats are likely to be loaded with this chemical, since conventional feed consists primarily of genetically and/or conventionally-raised grains such as corn. This is yet another reason to make sure you feed your family grass fed meats and animal products, especially your young children. Chlorpyrifos is also a commonly found water contaminant, and has even been found in indoor air.8

Children experience greater exposure to chemicals pound-for-pound than adults, and have an immature and porous blood-brain barrier that allows greater chemical exposures to reach their developing brain. Needless to say, the results can be devastating and, indeed, many agricultural and industrial chemicals have been found to affect children's brain function and development specifically

Comment: Read more about the disabling effects of organophosphates on future generations:


Info

Study finds mushrooms may have 'fountain of youth' benefits; contain important antioxidants

Mushrooms may make our favorite pizza and pasta dishes taste delightfully better, but it turns out they may help keep our brains and hearts younger too. A new study finds that some of our favorite toadstools may have high concentrations of antioxidants with anti-aging benefits.

Researchers at Penn State analyzed the chemical composition of a wide variety of types of mushrooms, finding that many contained high levels of ergothioneine and glutathione, both of which are important antioxidants.

"What we found is that, without a doubt, mushrooms are highest dietary source of these two antioxidants taken together, and that some types are really packed with both of them," says lead researcher Robert Beelman in a university news release.

It is widely accepted that the human body's chemical process of converting food into energy produces free radicals, which can cause damage to cells, protein, and DNA, the researchers explain.

Comment: See also: Mushrooms and their anti-aging potentials