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Health

Massage can help regrow muscle even on a non-massaged limb

Massage has been found to increase the regrowth of muscle tissue after an injury -- even when applied to the opposite, uninjured limb -- according to researchers from Colorado State University and the University of Kentucky.

It's well established that continuous deep massage treatment is an effective method of combating lower back pain.

In a paper published this week in The Journal of Physiology, the researchers showed that muscle grew faster after a massage because the making of protein in cells was improved. They also showed that when one leg was massaged, the muscle in the other, non-massaged leg also grew faster.

Muscle is lost very quickly during periods of disuse, such as during bed rest or a hospital stay, and it is extremely difficult to grow back, especially in older people. Massage is an easy-to-use treatment with very few side effects that can lessen pain, decrease anxiety and stress, increase flexibility, improve immunity, and increase blood flow. But its value for muscle regeneration had not been demonstrated before.

Wine n Glass

This is your brain on alcohol

Alcohol is such a ubiquitous part of our culture that it's easier to brush off any news of its harm than it is to even consider abandoning it in favor of better health, mental clarity, and spiritual awareness. And while there is no doubt that drinking can be fun, and no doubt that it is here to stay, it is still fascinating to see how a substance as harmful as alcohol can be legal and so well-accepted while other mind-altering substances are punished so severely.

We've known for sometime that even casual drinkers are susceptible to the downside of alcohol, and some research has even linked it to the development of cancer. The latest research into the harm of alcohol looks at how it affects the brain.

In a study published in July of 2017 in the medical journal The BMJ, researchers presented evidence supporting the enduring hypothesis that alcohol is very bad for the certain areas of the brain.
"The study followed 550 men and women for 30 years, measuring their brain structure and function to determine how alcohol use affects the mind over time. What they found is that the more people drank, the more atrophy occurred in the brain's hippocampus, a seahorse-shaped structure in your brain that plays a role in storing memories. The highest risk was for people who drank 17 standard drinks or more of alcohol per week. But even people who drank moderately saw an elevated risk for cognitive changes." [Source]

Comment: See also:


Health

Cancer cells destroyed with metal from the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs

© University of Warwick
Diagram showing iridium attacking a cancer cell by making it produce singlet oxygen
Cancer cells can be targeted and destroyed with the metal from the asteroid that caused the extinction of the dinosaurs, according to new research by an international collaboration between the University of Warwick and Sun Yat-Sen University in China.

Brain

Scientists identify mechanism that helps us inhibit unwanted thoughts

Scientists have identified a key chemical within the 'memory' region of the brain that allows us to suppress unwanted thoughts, helping explain why people who suffer from disorders such as anxiety, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), depression, and schizophrenia often experience persistent intrusive thoughts when these circuits go awry.

Comment: GABA is a supplement that is easily available online, including in a mixed formula that includes Taurine and L-Tyrosine.


Biohazard

Madagascar plague cases rocket by almost 40% in just 5 DAYS and could hit a further 20,000 in weeks

© Mail Online / Leo Delauncey
Analysis of figures by MailOnline show the plague epidemic in Madagascar could strike a further 20,000 people in just a matter of weeks, if current trends continue
  • The World Health Organization now states there are 1,801 suspected cases
  • This is significantly higher than the 1,309 the agency reported last Thursday
  • Professor Robin May, an infectious diseases expert at Birmingham University, told MailOnline that the outbreak is 'concerning definitely'
  • Analysis of figures by MailOnline show the epidemic could strike a further 20,000 people in just a matter of weeks, if current trends continue
  • The 'unprecedented' outbreak has prompted warnings in 9 nearby countries
The deadly airborne plague spreading rapidly across Madagascar is now at 'crisis' point as cases have rocketed by 37 per cent in just five days, official figures reveal.

The outbreak, the 'worst in 50 years', is being fueled by a strain more lethal than the one which usually strikes the country off the coast of Africa.

The World Health Organization (WHO) now states there are 1,801 suspected cases - significantly higher than the 1,309 it reported last Thursday.

Academics have revealed such a jump in cases over the period of five days is concerning and have predicted it could get worse. The most recent statistics show there have been 127 deaths.

Professor Robin May, an infectious diseases expert at Birmingham University, told MailOnline that 'whichever way you look' at the outbreak, it's 'concerning definitely'.

© MailOnline/ Emily Beeny
More than 1,300 cases have now been reported in Madagascar, health chiefs have revealed, as nearby nations have been placed on high alert

Comment: See also: Plague outbreak plunges Madagascar into a state of emergency , where we read:
The Madagascar Plague is actually three plagues.

The first is bubonic - the type which ravaged Europe and the Mediterranean in the thirteen hundreds, leaving up to 60 percent dead.


Actually, the bubonic plague was universally and unequivocally believed to be the cause of the Black Death in the thirteen hundreds, despite the fact that it is well-established as biologically impossible. For more information, see: New Light on the Black Death: The Viral and Cosmic Connection.


The second is pneumonic - a super strain of the yersinia pestis bacterium which always results in death.

The third, more rare strain, is septecaemic - a life-threatening infection of the blood.

In Madagascar plague is endemic, and flare-ups cause public health emergencies on an almost annual basis but now the nation faces an uncontrolled epidemic which is terrifying the world's health agencies.

Between 1 August and 27 October, 113 people had died and 1,554 cases reported - out of which 985 were pneumonic plague, 230 bubonic plague and 339 unknown.



Cloud Grey

How toxic air clouds mental health

© Reuters
The UK has broken EU air quality regulations every year since 2010
There is little debate over the link between air pollution and the human respiratory system: Research shows that dirty air can impair breathing and aggravate various lung diseases. Other potential effects are being investigated, too, as scientists examine connections between toxic air and obesity, diabetes and dementia.

Now add to that list psychological distress, which University of Washington researchers have found is also associated with air pollution. The higher the level of particulates in the air, the UW-led study showed, the greater the impact on mental health.

The study, published in the November issue of Health & Place, is believed to be the first to use a nationally representative survey pool, cross-referenced with pollution data at the census block level, to evaluate the connection between toxic air and mental health.

Health

Long term use of acid reflux drugs could double stomach cancer risks

A class of drugs commonly used to treat acid reflux and heartburn has been linked to a greater-than-doubled risk of developing stomach cancer, new research shows.

Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are used to suppress acid production in the stomach and are among the most widely sold drugs in the world, but a new study reveals that long-term use of the medicine can increase stomach cancer risks by almost 250 percent.

The risks are associated with a bacterium called Helicobacter pylori, carried by more than half of the world's population - most often harmlessly, but in a small percentage of people, the bug has been tied to the development of stomach cancer.

Previous research found that people with an ongoing Helicobacter pylori infection taking a PPI stood a greater chance of developing a precursor to stomach cancer, called atrophic gastritis.

While the mechanism for this was unclear, it's long been considered that eliminating the infection prior to taking PPIs - which have been linked to various adverse effects - might reduce the prospects of getting cancer.

But the new research shows that might not be the case.

Comment: More reasons to avoid Proton Pump Inhibitors: There are much safer solutions for preventing and treating acid reflux:


Syringe

Know what else comes through the needle?

Excipients in vaccines are chemicals that are not the main active ingredient, but are added to vaccines for several purposes. Preservatives are added to prevent contamination, and adjuvants are added to "killed virus" or subunit vaccines, and are designed to make the antigens more reactive and have a longer duration of action. This seems to be a good idea, but unfortunately there is a bad side, particularly to the two most popular additives: thimerosal and aluminum. Thimerosal, a preservative, is a mercury compound, added to vaccines to kill any "live viruses," fungi, and bacteria in the vial. Aluminum (as aluminum hydroxide or aluminum phosphate) is an adjuvant in vaccines meant to boost antibody response. Both of these metals are regarded as environmental toxins.

Comment: For more information, check out Vitamin C prevents side effects from the MMR vaccine
...in order to protect our children from any vaccination side effects, we give very high doses of vitamin C before, during (yes, even at the doctor's office) and after immunizations.



Document

NBC: Chuck Norris sues over MRI chemical he says poisoned wife

On Wednesday, action star Chuck Norris filed a lawsuit in San Francisco claiming that the gadolinium doctors injected into his wife, Gena Norris, to improve the clarity of her MRIs "have left her weak and tired and with debilitating bouts of pain and a burning sensation." NBC Los Angeles, November 1, 2017."

Why on earth we are still using gadolinium, a metal found in "contrast" agents used in many MRIs, has been shown to remain in some of our organs (like the brain, bones, and skin). However, according to the FDA and European Union agency, retained gadolinium isn't harmful.

Attention

Plague outbreak plunges Madagascar into a state of emergency

© AFP/Getty Images
Workers cleaning and disinfecting the tents where patients sleep at the health center.
A state of emergency has gripped Madagascar with schools and public meeting spaces closed, panic buying and hoarding of antibiotics, and 15,000 teachers being re-trained to spot and isolate those with signs of plague.

But the plague, which has so far killed 123 and left hundreds infected, is a super-strain which is even more infectious and deadly than famous the Bubonic Plague of the 14th century.

The Madagascar Plague is actually three plagues.

The first is bubonic - the type which ravaged Europe and the Mediterranean in the thirteen hundreds, leaving up to 60 percent dead.


Comment: Actually, the bubonic plague was universally and unequivocally believed to be the cause of the Black Death in the thirteen hundreds, despite the fact that it is well-established as biologically impossible. For more information, see: New Light on the Black Death: The Viral and Cosmic Connection.


Comment: Here is a map of the affected areas:
© Express
A map highlighting countries on high alert after a Black Death outbreak in Madagascar.
And keep in mind, as the panic spreads (like it did with Ebola scare two years ago):
Dr Arthur Rakotonjanabelo said: "Plague is a disease of poverty, because it thrives in places with poor sanitary conditions and health services."
The WHO has a long track record of hyping possible epidemics. Not to say that there never will be one, but is this it? Madagascar is routinely hit with plague outbreaks and we'll have to see how long it will take for this one to die down.

Health officials state that this particular outbreak is slated to last another six months and cite the practice of Famadihana as contributing to its spread.
The Sun yesterday reported how the outbreak has been fuelled by performing the ancient practice of Famadihana - which sees locals dig up deceased relatives and dance with them before they are re-buried.

It is feared the ceremony has helped spread an outbreak of pneumonic plague that has left more than 120 dead on the African island.

The country's health chief Willy Randriamarotia said: "If a person dies of pneumonic plague and is then interred in a tomb that is subsequently opened for a Famadihana, the bacteria can still be transmitted and contaminate whoever handles the body."

The tradition has been banned since the outbreak began, but it is feared ceremonies have taken place regardless.