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Biohazard

Man dies of bubonic plague in western Mongolia

Bubonic plague

Bubonic plague
A 42-year-old man died of bubonic plague in Khovd province in western Mongolia on Tuesday night, the country's health ministry said Wednesday.

The man was found to have bought two dead marmots before his death, Dorj Narangerel, head of public relations and surveillance department at the ministry, told a press conference.

Narangerel urged citizens not to hunt marmots or eat marmot meat to prevent the spread of bubonic plague.

Although hunting marmots is illegal in Mongolia, many Mongolians regard the rodent as a delicacy and ignore the law.

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Attention

'Mask mouth' is a seriously stinky side effect of wearing masks

mask mouth
© Getty Images/iStockphoto
Some bad breath just can't be covered up.

Now that dentists have reopened their doors, they're having patients show up with a nasty set of symptoms, which the doctors have dubbed "mask mouth."

The new oral hygiene issue — caused by, you guessed it, wearing a mask all the time to prevent the spread of the coronavirus — is leading to all kinds of dental disasters like decaying teeth, receding gum lines and seriously sour breath.

"We're seeing inflammation in people's gums that have been healthy forever, and cavities in people who have never had them before," says Dr. Rob Ramondi, a dentist and co-founder of One Manhattan Dental. "About 50% of our patients are being impacted by this, [so] we decided to name it 'mask mouth' — after 'meth mouth.' "

The term "meth mouth" is widely used by dentists to describe the dental problems that arise among methamphetamine users. Addicts often end up with cracked, black- and brown-stained teeth because the stimulant causes sugar cravings, teeth grinding and jaw clenching. They also often neglect their oral hygiene.

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SOTT Logo Radio

Objective:Health: Germ Theory vs. Terrain Theory - Why Not Both?

O:H header
Thanks to Louis Pasteur, a cornerstone of our modern medicine has been based on the notion of 'killing germs'. But current science is telling us that struggling against germs is not an accurate portrayal of what it means to be healthy.

Rather than thinking of our bodies as a battlefield, humans and microbes must now be seen as a co-evolved system for the mutual benefit of both the host and resident microbes. Health is the result of balanced harmony between resident microbes and human cells.

But alas, the germ theory is holding strong, with every new disease, no matter how benign (*cough* covid...), setting the medical establishment into full military mode, trying to come up with vaccines and medications to eradicate 'the enemy'. This paradigm has been with us for well over a century and yet we seem to have come to a dead end. Perhaps the mainstream medical establishment needs to incorporate some of Terrain theory into its tool kit to truly get to the bottom of human disease and how to deal with it.

Join us on this episode of Objective:Health as we look into where both germ theory and terrain theory get it right (and wrong).


And check us out on Brighteon!

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Running Time: 00:39:34

Download: MP3 — 36.2 MB


Brain

New 'breakthrough' Alzheimer's drug fast-tracked by US watchdog

old man on bench loneliness alzheimer's
The first drug that could halt Alzheimer's is to be fast-tracked for approval, in what experts say could be the biggest breakthrough yet in the fight against the disease.

Charities said the decision by US watchdogs to give the treatment a "priority review" could mean it would be prescribed within six months, giving hope to sufferers everywhere.

Trials have found that patients given aducanumab showed improvements in their language skills and ability to keep track of time and place, and a slower loss of memory.

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Question

The best way to measure rates of COVID immunity?

World Mask
© Sebastian Rushworth.com
In my previous post on the covid pandemic I mentioned that the body's main defence against viruses is T-cells, not antibodies, and that the only reason we test for antibodies instead in clinicial practice is because it is easier and cheaper. I also ventured a hypothesis that the levels of population immunity are much higher than is being found in the antibody tests, and that this is because lots of people who don't have antibodies do have covid specific T-cells. It turns out that this hypothesis is supported by new evidence.

A study carried out at Karolinska Institutet (where I went to medical school), which is still awaiting publication, looked at the presence of both antibody-based and T-cell specific immunity to covid among people in Stockholm. The data was collected during May. The first covid fatality in Sweden was in mid-March, so at that point covid had been raging for about two months.

The study was funded by Karolinska Institutet, the Swedish Research Council, and a number of private foundations and charities. The authors reported no conflicts of interest.

Study participants were recruited in to five distinct cohorts, with a total of around 200 individuals:

Biohazard

New virus passed via tick bites emerges in China, seven killed so far

mosquito
© gmw.cn
Super mosquito with 20-times bigger body compared with common ones
A new type of virus, which is likely to be passed to be infected after bite by ticks, is emerging in China, with more than 60 people infected and killed at least seven.

According to media reports, more than 37 people in East China's Jiangsu Province have contracted with the virus - SFTS Virus in the first half of the year; and later 23 people was found infected in East China's Anhui Province.

Wang, a woman in Nanjing, capital of Jiangsu who suffered from the virus showed onset of symptoms such like fever, coughing and doctors found decline of leukocyte, blood platelet inside of her body.

Comment: RT provides more details:
The current case fatality rate of the re-emerging disease is between approximately 16 and 30 percent, according to the China Information System for Disease Control and Prevention.

While the infection is primarily transmitted through tick bites, transition between humans cannot be excluded, Sheng Jifang, a doctor from a hospital under Zhejiang University, told the Global Times, explaining that it could be passed through blood or mucous.

A 2015 outbreak of the same virus in Japan and South Korea had a mortality rate of more than 30 percent in both countries. The virus is known to be particularly harmful for older or immunocompromised people.

The doctors also warn that tick bites are a major transmission route not only for SFTS, but other infections as well. They say there is no reason to panic, however, if people exercise caution.

In 2018, the World Health Organization included SFTS on its list of the diseases prioritized for research together with the likes of Ebola, SARS and Zika. Those viruses were singled out due to their high potential to cause a public health emergency and lack of efficacious drugs or vaccines against them.
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Syringe

These NHS staff were told the swine flu vaccine was safe, now they're suffering the consequences

NHS workers swine flu vaccine injury
© BuzzFeed
Dozens of NHS workers are fighting for compensation after developing narcolepsy from a swine flu vaccine that was rushed into service without the usual testing when the disease spread across the globe in 2009. They say it has destroyed their careers and their health.

When nurse Meleney Gallagher was told to line up with her colleagues on the renal ward at Sunderland Royal Hospital, for her swine flu vaccination, she had no idea the injection she was about to have had not gone through the usual testing process.

It had been rushed into circulation after the swine flu virus had swept across the globe in 2009, prompting fears thousands of people could die. From the moment the needle broke Gallagher's skin, her life would never be the same.

"I remember vividly we were all lined up in the corridor and we were told we had to have it. It wasn't a choice," she claimed. "I was pressured into it. We were given no information."

The date was 23 November 2009 and Gallagher was one of thousands of NHS staff vaccinated with Pandemrix, a vaccine made by pharmaceutical giant GlaxoSmithKline (GSK).

Comment: Obviously, lessons were not learned:

Objective:Health - Operation 'Warped' Speed - These People Are Crazy!


Quenelle - Golden

'Vaccines-or-masks' policy of Canadian health authorities ruled 'unreasonable' in 2015 arbitration case

vaccinate masks policy

A 'vaccinations-or-masks' policy was legally ruled 'unreasonable' in Canada in 2018, following detailed cases investigating scientific efficacy of surgical masks
The Ontario arbitration fight about masks is really stunning. The background: several Ontario hospitals wanted to make all nurses get flu vaccinations. Legally they couldn't. So they required the nurses who wouldn't get vaccinated to wear masks.

The nurses filed a grievance saying that masks were useless and they should not be forced to wear them. Both sides took the arbitration very seriously.

A long fight ensued. Both sides called experts and offered evidence. And in two decisions - in 2015 and 2018 - separate arbitrators ruled for the nurses.
ontario nurses masks

Comment: For more on the Ontario nurses' successful defeat of a pseudo-scientific facemask policy back in 2015 (and again in 2018), read this:

Union says Ontario nurses can't be forced to wear masks in flu season
CBC, 10 September 2015


Beaker

Fact-Checking a 'Fact-Checker' on Covid-19: A Response to HealthFeedback.org

Fact Checking Covid-19
© Unknown
On July 12 an organization called Health Feedback posted a review of my and Patrick Corbett's July 2 OffGuardian article on the bombshell revelations of Bulgarian Pathology Association President Dr. Stoian Alexov. They stamped it "inaccurate."

This article is a refutation of Health Feedback's so-called fact-checking. I show why Dr. Alexov's statements, in fact, fit the evidence, and punch plenty of other holes in Health Feedback's claim that our article is "clearly wrong" and has "very little credibility."

Health Feedback's review is fatally faulty right off the top, when the review's unnamed author mistakes my co-author Patrick Corbett for James Corbett of The Corbett Report: the screencap at the top of the review is from James Corbett's June 16 interview with me.

The review also takes a swipe at outlets that reposted our article: it notes Media Bias/Fact Check dubs GlobalResearch.ca and Australian National Review "conspiracy websites."

Pills

Lithium-laced drinking water could be curbing suicide rates, scientists say

lithium
© Alamy Stock Photo
For communities with a low rate of depression and suicide, there may be something in the water, according to a new study.

A comprehensive analysis of findings from previous studies has revealed that regions where the public drinking water contains a high level of naturally occurring lithium — a mineral used most often for the treatment of depression and bipolar disorder — also boast a lower rate of suicide than other areas. The review included all prior research on the effects of lithium, as well as regional water samples and suicide data from 1,286 locales in Austria, Greece, Italy, Lithuania, the UK, Japan and the United States.

"Naturally occurring lithium in drinking water may have the potential to reduce the risk of suicide and may possibly help in mood stabilization, particularly in populations with relatively high suicide rates and geographical areas with a greater range of lithium concentration in the drinking water," the authors concluded in their report.

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