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Mon, 24 Apr 2017
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Health

The risks of calcium overload

© sasimoto / Fotolia
You've probably heard you that need lots of calcium in your diet to have strong bones and a healthy body. But do you know the risks of taking too much calcium?

You can actually overdose on this mineral, and there are side effects.

Your body needs calcium, but it's important to take the right amount of this important mineral.

HYPERCALCEMIA

Hypercalcemia is the medical term for a high calcium (Ca2+) level in the blood serum. People with a mild increase that has developed slowly usually have no symptoms.

But in those with greater levels or rapid onset, symptoms may include abdominal pain, bone pain, confusion, depression, weakness, kidney stones, or an abnormal heart rhythm including cardiac arrest. Most cases are due to primary hyperparathyroidism or cancer.

Too much calcium in your diet is typically not related to hypercalcemia, which is a serious medical condition. Excess dietary calcium can cause constipation, and may increase your risk of kidney stones.

Comment: See also:


Eye 1

Google wants to map human health, seeks 10,000 volunteers for invasive screening

Predictive medicine - or "precision health" as it is sometimes known - is a trend in healthcare that is growing exponentially. Perhaps the greatest indication to date that this is slated to be the future of disease prevention and patient care is a massive new investment by tech behemoth and king of the algorithm, Google.

However, in order to continue along the path toward true predictive modeling, there will need to be a group of people willing to be tracked and monitored to a never-before-seen degree. And herein also lies some concern about what the future will look like if all of our most intimate functions are logged and analyzed for inspection by the central computers of Google and the healthcare State.

People might not know, but Google is not only synonymous with online browsing and search engines; it has a health division called Verily. It is the result of an undertaking that began in 2014 as Google Life Sciences and has become one of the company's most intricate and far-reaching endeavors. None more so than the specific mission to predict future illness. Verily's bold mission has now been given a name: Project Baseline. Preliminary estimates put the price tag near $100 million.

The ramp-up in predictive medicine initiatives is demonstrable in everything from consumer wearable electronics with simple monitoring capabilities right up to smartphone apps that have been developed to connect doctors to patients with a history of depression.

Comment: Lord, help us all.


Health

Sunflower seeds frequently contaminated with aflatoxin

Michigan State University researchers have shown that sunflower seeds are frequently contaminated with a toxin produced by molds and pose an increased health risk in many low-income countries worldwide.

In the current issue of PLoS ONE, the team of scientists documented frequent occurrence of aflatoxin - a toxin produced by Aspergillus molds that commonly infect corn, peanuts, pistachios and almonds - in sunflower seeds and their products. This is one of the first studies to associate aflatoxin contamination with sunflower seeds.

The study was conducted in Tanzania, but the problem is by no means isolated there. Chronic exposure to aflatoxin causes an estimated 25,000-155,000 deaths worldwide each year, from corn and peanuts alone. Since it is one of the most potent liver carcinogens known, the research to detect and limit its presence in sunflower seeds and their products could help save lives and reduce liver disease in areas where sunflowers and their byproducts are consumed, said Gale Strasburg, MSU food science and human nutrition professor and one of the study's co-authors.

"These high aflatoxin levels, in a commodity frequently consumed by the Tanzanian population, indicate that local authorities must implement interventions to prevent and control aflatoxin contamination along the sunflower commodity value chain, to enhance food and feed safety in Tanzania," he said. "Follow-up research is needed to determine intake rates of sunflower seed products in humans and animals, to inform exposure assessments and to better understand the role of sunflower seeds and cakes as a dietary aflatoxin source."

Comment: Even when not contaminated, sunflower and other PUFA-heavy seed oils release cancer-causing chemicals and should never be used.


Sheeple

Eating clean, unprocessed foods is now a dangerous "cult," declares idiotic mainstream media (with a little help from the dirty dairy industry)

As more people are turning their back to dairy and other processed foods, the National Osteoporosis Society, subsidized by the milk industry, has now declared clean eating to be a dangerous "cult" and "ticking time bomb" that could leave young people with weak bones.

For decades, the milk industry has made us believe that milk is crucial for our health. Most of us have been brought up with the idea our teeth and bones will crumble if we don't drink three big glasses of calcium-rich milk every day.

Though scientific research has linked milk consumption to cancer, diabetes, osteoporosis, multiple sclerosis, heart diseases, allergies, and a host of other diseases, governments and celebrity shills with thick milk mustaches keep telling us that milk is essential to our health. These celebrities, however, forget to tell you that they were paid to make these statements, hiding the dangers lurking behind these hip milk mustaches.

In their latest attempt to push antibiotic- and hormone-rich dairy products onto the people, the mainstream media is spreading fears to spook people into believing healthy dietary choices that reject processed foods are dangerous.

Of all the rumors the fake media, which depends on the advertising money of the dairy industry, has spit into the world, this one breaks all the records. Trying to convince people that eating fresh, whole foods is dangerous is just insane.

Pills

The evolution of Big Pharma's profit machine


Thanks to drug safety scandals and new methods of marketing, the bloom had fallen off the Pharma reps' roses.


More than a decade ago, the job of pharmaceutical rep was enviable. Direct-to-consumer advertising pre-sold many drugs so doctors already knew about them. Medical offices welcomed the reps who were usually physically attractive and brought lunch. In fact, reps sometimes had their own reception rooms in medical offices and seemed to see doctors before waiting patients.

By 2011 thanks to drug safety scandals and new methods of marketing, the bloom had fallen off the Pharma reps' roses. The number of prescribers willing to see most reps fell almost 20 percent, the number refusing to see all reps increased by half, and eight million sales calls "could not be completed" at all, reported ZS Associates.

Some doctors did not hide their antipathy. Salt Lake City family doctor Ross Brunetti estimated six reps called on his office every morning and six more in the afternoon. "In a week, I might see three people trying to sell me the same thing," he complained. "There are more drug reps than patients. It's like a minefield."

Bullseye

Medical freedom & informed consent under attack: Federal grants come with vaccine mandates

Medical Freedom is at risk in every state of the nation under vaccine mandates.

Since the removal of religious and personal belief vaccine exemptions by the State of California under law SB277, the federal government is widening the net to go after states by region through block grants for early childcare programs.

The government's message? If you want federal assistance, ante up and remove the religious and philosophical exemptions for vaccines.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) set a trap under The Child Care Development Fund when it sent Conditional Approval letters to states for fiscal year 2016-2018 that conditionally approve early childcare programs until all new requirements are fully implemented, including the removal of vaccine exemptions.

TV

Chasing the Dragon: Documentary provides raw look at opioid crisis

If you or someone you know is hooked on prescription drugs such as Oxycontin and Vicodin, or street drugs like heroin, you'll connect with "Chasing the Dragon," a raw 2016 documentary about the horrors of drug addiction.

Produced by the U.S. Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI), the film features ordinary Americans sharing personal stories of danger and destruction that characterized their lives prior to recovery from hard-core drug addiction.

Because the documentary is filled with harsh language and disturbing images, parental discretion is advised.

In 2015, 52,404 Americans died from drug overdoses; 33,091 of them involved an opioid and nearly one third of them, 15,281, were by prescription.1,2,3 Meanwhile, kidney disease, listed as the 9th leading cause of death on the CDC's top 10 list, killed 48,146.4

The CDC does not include drug overdoses on this list, but if you did, drug overdoses (63 percent of which are opioids), would replace kidney disease as the 9th leading cause of death as of 2015.

Many of those featured in "Chasing the Dragon" are regular people from good homes and loving families. The one characteristic they had in common while using was a feeling of powerlessness to escape the spiraling cycle of drug use and abuse that dominated every moment of their lives.

One recovering addict, a woman named Melissa, had this to say about her drug use: "It became my full-time job. The needle was my boss — a very demanding boss."

To prevent you or someone you love from becoming addicted to prescription painkillers, I'd like to take a closer look at opioid abuse and offer several healthy alternatives to help you manage pain.

SOTT Logo Radio

The Health & Wellness Show: Yoga Demystified

What is yoga and why has it become so popular in today's world? Does it really help relieve stress, increase stamina, improve mental health and lead to 'enlightenment'? In 2016 more than 36 million people in the U.S. were practicing some form of Yoga. Has this ancient practice been watered down, and sold out? Is there a dark side that practitioners and teachers alike experience? On this episode of the Health and Wellness show we will discuss the science and research that draws many to the practice. Yoga is not just about flexibility or the ability to do difficult postures, but rather it is about developing awareness of the body, mind and spirit. Join us as we demystify the practice and touch on many misconceptions about what it really means to 'do yoga'.

And stay tuned for Zoya's Pet Health Segment!

Running Time: 01:36:43

Download: OGG, MP3


Listen live, chat, and call in to future shows on the SOTT Radio Network!


Black Magic

Diet soft drinks triples stroke & dementia risk compared to normal daily cola habit - study

© Shannon Stapleton / Reuters
Diet soft drinks might not actually be better for you, as a recent study finds drinkers face a higher risk of stroke and dementia just for the taste of the real thing.

A team of scientists from Boston University School of Medicine studied nearly 4,400 adults and found those who consume one artificially-sweetened beverage (ASB) a day have three times the risk of stroke and dementia than those who consume sugar sweetened beverages (SSB), according to a study published Thursday in the American Heart Association's journal Stroke.


Comment: Those numbers appear frightening but for context, what we really need to know is what the risks are for people consuming cane sugar sweetened drinks and what the risks are for people not consuming sweetened drinks. Without that data, the results are virtually meaningless. For example if the base risk is 1 in a million, then a 3 fold increase in risk moves it to 1 in 333,333, not nearly so scary.


The study used data provided by the Framingham Heart Study, which had the participants fill out a detailed questionnaire on their food and drink intake in the 1990s. Ten years later, scientists found that the adults who had one more diet drink a day were 2.9 times more likely to develop dementia and three times more at risk of strokes compared to those who consumed less than one a week.

Comment: See also:


Pills

Epilepsy drug valproate 'responsible for up to 4,100 severe birth defects', French study

© Robert Pratta / Reuters
A drug designed to treat epilepsy and bipolar disorder may be responsible for 4,100 severe birth defects in babies, French health authorities have said.

A preliminary study published by the French National Agency for the Safety of Medicines (ANSM), in conjunction with the country's health insurance administration, found that women whose epilepsy was treated with the drug valproate were four times more likely have babies with major congenital malformations.

Women who took the same medication for bipolar disorder were twice as likely, the report said.

"The study confirms the highly teratogenic [capability of causing birth defects] nature of valproate," said Mahmoud Zureik, scientific director of ANSM and the study's co-author.