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Syringe

What Pfizer/BioNTech Isn't Telling us About The New mRNA COVID-19 Vaccine

vaccin pfizer BioNTech
© Joel Saget / AFP
Since I began my medical studies, I read everything I could read about my profession, but also about related topics. I still do that, if only because I really enjoy reading, and to this day I haven't finished learning and reading. Along the way, to my surprise at first, I learned that many of my colleagues don't, and limit themselves to compulsory training and (sometimes) guidelines. There are several reasons for this that I will not mention here.

However, it's also difficult to keep up with the medical literature, given the sheer number of articles that appear on a daily basis. It's a considerable task to separate the wheat from the chaff of this medical literature. Reading the reports of scientific research itself - compared to reading reviews and case reports - is quite a large task, as it takes a lot of time and effort to form at least an overall assessment of the methodology and statistics used, and to be able to assess whether the research was carried out properly.

And yet that's what I'll try to do here, again. This concerns, of course, data on the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine against the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which was published online on December 10th on the website of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Syringe

COVID Mass Vaccination Experiment: Prepare For The Worst With This Health Protocol

vaccines protest
I wrote First, Do No Harm: If Primary Healthcare Remains Shut Down, Toll on Elderly Will be Worse Than COVID-19 back in March 2020. My prediction turned out to be correct. During this time, the COVID-19 pseudo-reality has made Primary Health Care almost unrecognizable.

I became determined over the last year of my practice to prioritize anything life-threatening or related to Primary Health Care, leaving bureaucracy or follow-ups related to the 'pandemic' (which is really one of people with NO symptoms, at all) as my last priority (and got a hard time from administration for doing that). It made me realize not only the damage done to our society, but also the absurdity of everything today.

Now the vaccination campaign has begun in earnest, and so has the winter flu season. After a summer and autumn of no typical COVID-19 cases, doctors are starting to see some action again. Some are coming to me with symptoms of the COVID-19 pneumonia we saw back in springtime (and earlier). I suspect that the thousands of people who have already received the experimental vaccines - approved against common sense and precautions - have something to do with this uptick. Thus, I feel compelled to write again, out of concern for the millions who are considering getting vaccinated - either because they believe the COVID-19 vaccines will protect them, or because they feel they have no choice other than to take them.

Syringe

Canadian personal support worker suffers 'rare but severe' reaction to Pfizer COVID-19 vaccine

Deborah Tilli

Deborah Tilli, 27, is one of the rare people to have had a severe reaction to the vaccine, and a week later she's still not fully recovered.
When Deborah Tilli got the call last week telling her she'd be one of the first long-term-care workers in Hamilton vaccinated for COVID-19, she felt a mix of emotions.

A part of her was nervous, a part excited.

But what happened in the minutes after Tilli rolled up her sleeve for the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine on Christmas Eve has her cautioning those with allergies ahead of getting the jab.

Comment: See also:


Beaker

UK allows mixing COVID-19 vaccines as experts warn of risks

COVID vaccine
© ZUMAPRESS.com
The Pfizer/BioNtech COVID vaccine at a clinic in Buckinghamshire, England.
British health officials will now allow people to mix COVID-19 vaccines as the pandemic rages on — but experts warn it could be risky.

The tweak in vaccine advice, which comes as the country grapples with a new, highly contagious mutation of the virus, marks a surprising departure from previous guidance — and a starkly different approach to the vaccine rollout in the US, The New York Times reported.

The UK protocol now states that a person can receive their follow-up COVID-19 jab with a different vaccine candidate to their first dose, if necessary. Britain has approved two vaccines for the deadly bug, developed by AstraZeneca and Pfizer. The updated guidance states:
"For individuals who started the schedule and who attend for vaccination at a site where the same vaccine is not available, or if the first product received is unknown, it is reasonable to offer one dose of the locally available product to complete the schedule."
However, the protocol does reiterate that receiving a second dose of the same vaccination is preferable, noting that a different inoculation should only be used if the patient is at "immediate high risk" or is considered "unlikely to attend again." "In these circumstances, as both the vaccines are based on the spike protein, it is likely the second dose will help to boost the response to the first dose," it explained.

But the new advice has still raised eyebrows in the scientific community.

Comment: Vaccine wars across the pond? Jabs abound:
"The New York Times really does have it in for poor old Britain, doesn't it? Not content with portraying Brits as boiled mutton eating swamp dwellers..."




Biohazard

HUNDREDS of Israelis get infected with Covid-19 after receiving Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine

jew vaccine
© Reuters / Amir Cohen
An ultra-Orthodox Jewish man receives a vaccination against the coronavirus disease in Ashdod, Israel.
With the vaccine not providing immediate immunity to the coronavirus, over two hundred Israeli citizens have been diagnosed with the disease days after getting the Pfizer/BioNTech jabs, local media reported.

The number of those who got Covid-19 despite being vaccinated was at around 240 people, according to data from Channel 13 News.

The Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine, which the Israeli health authorities rely on, doesn't contain the coronavirus and can't infect the recipient. But time is needed for the genetic code in the drug to train the immune system to recognize and attack the disease.

The course of the US-made vaccine requires two shots. According to the studies, immunity to Covid-19 increases only eight to ten days after the first injection and eventually reaches 50 percent.

Comment: The Gateway Pundit reports that over in the US numerous people have contracted coronavirus after receiving the vaccine:
As the highly touted Covid vaccine makes its way into the arms of nurses, doctors, elderly, and others who are immuno-compromised, it appears as though it isn't as effective as we were led to believe. An ER nurse in San Diego received his Covid vaccination last week. Seven days later, he started feeling symptoms, and tested positive for the virus the next day.

Cue the experts, who tell us this isn't uncommon, it's what they expect, and this is only one of many cases where a vaccinated individual still contracted the virus.

UPDATE: We're being told that all along doctors and Pfizer have said this is a two dose vaccine, and that the first dose could be ineffective. A second dose is necessary about 30 days later to acquire actual immunity. In the meantime, those who got the first dose are still susceptible to the virus.
In a Facebook message posted on December 18, Matthew W., an ER nurse at two different local hospitals, talked about receiving the Pfizer vaccine that day. He told ABC 10News his arm was sore for a day but he suffered no other side effects.

Six days later on Christmas Eve — after working a shift in the COVID-19 unit — Matthew, 45, became sick. He got the chills and later came down with muscle aches and fatigue.

The day after Christmas, he went to a drive-up hospital testing site and tested positive for COVID-19.

"It's not unexpected at all. If you work through the numbers, this is exactly what we'd expect to happen if someone was exposed," said Dr. Christian Ramers, an infectious disease specialist with Family Health Centers of San Diego. He serves on the clinical advisory panel for the county's vaccine rollout.

Dr. Ramers says he knows of several other local cases where health care workers became infected around the time they received the vaccine. He says all the cases illustrate the fact that results aren't immediate. Even after you start receiving some protection, it won't be full protection.

"That first dose we think gives you somewhere around 50%, and you need that second dose to get up to 95%," said Dr. Ramers.
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Syringe

COVID 'vaccines' are a medical experiment on humanity

COVID Vaccines
© Harvard University
The person who tested positive for coronavirus in December had been vaccinated just hours before their Jan. 21, 2021 death.
How are the COVID vaccines different from other vaccines on the market?

The COVID vaccines are mRNA (messenger RNA) vaccines, which are completely new. No mRNA vaccine has ever been licensed for human use before. There are no other therapies or prophylactics on the market that use the same approach, despite a handful of efforts.

Traditional vaccines introduce pieces of a virus ("live" or inert), as well as adjuvants such as aluminum and mercury, to stimulate an immune reaction. The new mRNA vaccine is completely different. It actually injects (transfects) molecules of synthetic genetic material from non-human sources into our cells. Once in the cells, the genetic material interacts with our transfer RNA (tRNA) to make a foreign protein that supposedly teaches the body to destroy the virus being coded for. So the vaccine is hijacking the protein-makeup machinery.

Note that these newly created proteins are not regulated by our own DNA, and are thus completely foreign to our cells. What they are fully capable of doing is unknown.

The Moderna vaccine is given in two doses, 28 days apart. The Pfizer vaccine will require two shots, three weeks apart.

The Pfizer and Moderna vaccines also include the traditional toxic adjuvants.

Life Preserver

Actual science: University of Florida researchers find no asymptomatic or presymptomatic spread of Coronavirus

University of Florida Department of Biostatistics

University of Florida Department of Biostatistics
Four researchers from the University of Florida Department of Biostatistics co-authored a study published online by the Journal of the American Medical Association. They performed a meta-analysis of 54 studies looking at the household secondary attack rate of SARS-CoV-2. According to the CDC, the secondary attack rate is the number of new cases among contacts divided by the total number of contacts.

The researchers confirmed that SARS-CoV-2 is more contagious than other coronaviruses, with a secondary attack rate of 16.6% (95% CI 14.0%-19.3%) compared to 7.5% (95%CI 4.8%-10.7%) for SARS-CoV and 4.7% (95%CI, 0.9%-10.7%) for MERS-CoV.

Comment: See also:


Syringe

Scientists scramble to identify culprit behind covid vaccine allergic reactions

PEG chain polyethylene glycol

Polyethylene glycol
All is not going according to plan in the global rollout of what is arguably the most important vaccine in a century, and it is not just growing mistrust in the covid injection effort that was rolled out in record time: an unexpected spike in allergic reactions to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine may prove catastrophic to widespread acceptance unless scientists can figure out what is causing it after the FDA's rushed approval. So in a welcome development, the WSJ reports that according to scientists, the potential culprit causing the allergic reactions to the Pfizer/BioNTech vaccine is the compound polyethylene glycol, also known as PEG.

According to the CDC, at least six severe allergic reactions to the vaccine have been reported so far in the US out of 272,001 doses administered through Dec. 19, while at least two cases of anaphylaxis have also occurred in the UK.

Polyethylene glycol - a polyether compound derived from petroleum with many applications, from industrial manufacturing to medicine - is present in both the Moderna and Pfizer-BioNTech vaccines for SARS-CoV-2 as a PEGylated lipid, which is used as an excipient. Both RNA vaccines consist of Messenger RNA, or mRNA, encased in a bubble of oily molecules called lipids. Proprietary lipid technology is used for each. In both vaccines, the bubbles are coated with a stabilizing molecule of polyethylene glycol.

Comment: See also:


Syringe

Doctor reportedly has severe allergic reaction to Moderna COVID vaccine

moderna covid vaccine
© Getty Images
A Boston doctor suffered a serious allergic reaction to Moderna's coronavirus vaccine, the first of its kind documented, a report said Friday.

Dr. Hossein Sadrzadeh, a geriatric oncologist at Boston Medical Center, became dizzy and felt his heart racing minutes after receiving the vaccine on Thursday, he told The New York Times.

"It was the same anaphylactic reaction that I experience with shellfish," Dr. Sadrzadeh told the paper, noting that his tongue became numb, his blood pressure plummeted and he broke into a cold sweat.

Comment: See also:


Chalkboard

A brilliant analysis of vaccination, by Richard Moskowitz, MD and homeopath

Vaccines
© Harvard University
In the age of COVID, vaccination looms large. As in mandatory. And of course, toxic.

I've already covered two new vaccine technologies, one of which has already been pushed forward, to "protect" people from a virus that has never been properly proven to exist.

DNA vaccines, aka gene therapy, permanently alter recipients' genetic makeup in unknown ways. RNA vaccines (Pfizer's and Moderna's, just approved for COVID) can cause auto-immune reactions — which means the body attacks itself. [1] [2]

In this piece, I want to take a look at a few fundamentals about vaccination. In particular, the claim that vaccines have done a fantastic job of reducing case numbers of diseases, and therefore all criticisms of these injections are irrelevant.

From his bio [3]: "Richard Moskowitz was born in 1938, and educated at Harvard (B.A.) and New York University (M.D.). After medical school he did 3 years of graduate study in Philosophy at the University of Colorado in Boulder on a U. S. Steel Fellowship."