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6.4-magnitude earthquake hits Campo Gallo, Argentina - 2nd major quake in area in 4 days

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An earthquake with a magnitude of 6.4 jolted 33 km WSW of Campo Gallo, Argentina, at 18:37:00 GMT on Tuesday, the U.S. Geological Survey said.

The epicenter, with a depth of 601.024 km, was initially determined to be at 26.6892 degrees south latitude and 63.165 degrees west longitude.

Comment: Details of the earlier quake: Powerful magnitude 6.8 earthquake hits north Argentina


Igloo

Temperatures in northern hemisphere due to fall over next 25 years, according to six top international scientists

Winter is Coming
© The Daily Sceptic
Whisper it quietly - and don't tell Al 'Boiling Oceans' Gore - but the Northern hemisphere may be entering a temperature cooling phase until the 2050s with a decline up to 0.3°C. By extension, the rest of the globe will also be cooled. These sensational findings, ignored by the mainstream media, were released last year and are the work of six top international scientists led by Nour-Eddine Omrani of the Norwegian Bjerknes Centre for Climate Research. Published in the Nature journal Climate and Atmospheric Science, the scientists say that the North Atlantic Multidecadal Oscillation, an important sea current that has been pumping warmer water into the Arctic, is weakening and that's leading to a cooler North Atlantic area and lower temperatures, as was observed in the period 1950-1970.

Certainly, current observations back up these suggestions. As we reported recently, Arctic summer sea ice stopped declining about a decade ago and has shown recent growth. The Greenland surface ice sheet grew by almost 500 billion tonnes in the year to August 2022, and this was nearly equivalent to its estimated annual loss. Of course, climate alarmists have not quite caught up with these recent trends, with Sir David Attenborough telling his BBC Frozen Planet II audience that the summer sea ice could all be gone within 12 years.

Interestingly, the six scientists, whose work has helped debunk the 'settled' science myth, still attribute some global warming to human causes. The Northern hemisphere is characterised by "several multidecadal climate trends that have been attributed to anthropogenic climate change". But producing work that predicts 30 years of global cooling puts them outside the 'settled' narrative that claims human-produced carbon dioxide is the main - possibly the only - determinant of global and local temperatures. At the very least, it dials down the hysteria pushing for almost immediate punitive net-Zero measures. Lead author Omrani is reported to have said that the expected warming pause "gives us time to work out technical, political and economic solutions before the next warming phase, which will take over again from 2050".

Needless to say, such thinking was absent at last week's Davos climate freak show, with elite delegates ramping up the fearmongering to record heights. Former U.S. Vice-President Al Gore went into full meltdown, ranting about "rain bombs" and "boiling oceans". Current U.S. climate envoy, and private jet owner, John Kerry described the gathering as a "select" group of people trying to "save the planet", while chief UN carnival barker Antonio Guterres claimed we were flirting with climate disaster and every week brought a new horror story. Of course, some might suggest that in the circumstances this was an all-round excellent effort to whip up more money - ahem, I mean more genuine climate concern - at a time when corals, Arctic sea ice, the Greenland ice sheet, polar bears and now global warming are having to be retired from the poster-alarm portfolio.

Snowflake Cold

Polar freeze in Spain brings temperatures of -15°C and snow in Ibiza

Snow on the beach in Ibiza.
© Majorca Daily Bulletin
Snow on the beach in Ibiza.
Temperatures of -15°C were recorded in one part of Spain during the current polar freeze and it even snowed on the Balearic island of Ibiza.

As confirmed by AEMET, the State Meteorological Agency, the Balearic island of Ibiza has met with unusual weather conditions thanks to the polar freeze currently affecting Spain.

This morning, Monday, January 23, residents of the town of Talaia de Sant Josep - located 475 metres above sea level - woke up to a blanket covering of snow. The town of Sant Joan de Labritja recorded -1.8°C overnight.


Snowflake Cold

Heavy snow causes disruption in Italy, Austria, Slovenia, Croatia and Mallorca

Snowfall
© AP
Mallorca was hit by its largest snowfall in more than five years on Monday, with 7 centimetres settling in Fornalutx and a temperature of -2.4 degrees Celsius registered in the Sierra de Tramuntana mountain range.

The Palma Met Office said on Monday that even heavier snow is expected on Wednesday, with as much as 10 centimetres falling in some areas.


Doberman

7-year-old boy dies after being attacked by dogs in Fort Hall, Idaho

dog attack
A seven-year-old boy was attacked and killed by a pack of four dogs in Fort Hall on Saturday.

The Bannock County Coroner Torey Danner confirms the boy was attacked at his home. Danner said the boy's mother tried to fend off the dogs, but she also was mauled.

They both were taken to Portneuf Medical Center in Pocatello where the seven-year-old was pronounced dead.

His mother did survive after emergency surgery and remains in the hospital.

Police report the dogs were Rottweiller and mixed breeds that lived in another house on the property.


Cloud Precipitation

Two die, seven missing after flash flood hits holidaymakers on China's Yellow River

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People cling to rocks Sunday, Jan. 22, 2023, amid the rushing water of the Yellow River downstream from China’s Sanmenxia Hydropower Station.
At least two people are dead and seven remained missing on Monday after families celebrating Lunar New Year were swept away in a sudden flood from China's Yellow River, state media reported.

Video of the tragedy circulated widely on social media as rescue workers kept looking for survivors after 10 people were saved by the quick-witted response of those around them as torrents of water hit a group of people in what appeared to be a flash flood.

The Sanmenxia emergency response bureau warned people to "pay attention to personal safety over the holiday period," issuing a video of safety guidelines for people drawn to water at picturesque tourism spots.


Better Earth

Earth's inner core seems to have stopped spinning, and may be in the process of changing direction, new study reveals

core
© Constantine Johnny/Getty Images
Few of us give much thought to Earth's swirling, spinning contents until some sudden movement, an earthquake or a volcanic eruption, jolts us to our senses.

Geoscientists, though, are a little more clued into the dynamics of Earth's guts, and have just discovered that Earth's solid inner iron core - which usually spins within a near-frictionless molten outer envelope - appears to have slowed to a grinding halt.

Before anybody panics and searches for a copy of a terrible 20-year-old science fiction movie predicting such an event in hopes of inspiring a solution, it's not the first time record of such an event. It's not even the first in recent history.

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Bizarro Earth

Coldest December for 50 years in Iceland

Cold Iceland
© mbl.is/Eggert Jóhannesson
December brought some record cold weather all over the country, but especially in the capital region which has not seen such cool numbers for over a century.
Last December was the coldest December in the country since 1973, or for almost half a century ago, with an average temperature in the country -4.0 degrees Celsius or 24.8 degrees Fahrenheit.

December has not been as cold in over 100 years in Reykjavík, but the last time it was this cold in the capital was in December 1916, according to the Met Office.

The month was the eighth-coldest December on record nationwide since the start of recording temperatures.

The country was dry for most of the year, and in many parts of the country, December rainfall was the lowest recorded in decades.

Average temperatures only three times lower in Reykjavík

In Reykjavík, the average temperature in December was -3.9 degrees Celcius, which is 4.7 degrees below the average for 1991 to 2020, and 4.9 degrees below the average for the last ten years.

The average temperature in the month of December in Reykjavík has only been lower three times before, which was the December of 1878, 1886 and 1880, when it was much colder.

In Akureyri, the average temperature was -5.3 degrees Celcius, 4.7 degrees below average for 1991 to 2020, and 4.6 degrees below average for the last ten years. This was the seventh coldest December since the start of recorded temperatures in Akureyri, and the coldest since 1973.

Boat

Heavy rainfall causes widespread floods across Europe

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Days of heavy rainfall across Europe have led to severe flooding in parts of Hungary, Serbia, Spain and Kosovo. Footage from these locations showed streets and fields totally submerged. Hungarians said the rain was unexpectedly high for this time of year, with one resident saying: 'Floods have become a new tradition'

Source: As credited/Reuters


Boat

At least 30 dead due to heavy rains, flooding in the Philippines (UPDATE)

SWAMPED. A house is almost completely submerged in floodwaters in Can-avid town, Eastern Samar.
© Can-avid LGU
SWAMPED. A house is almost completely submerged in floodwaters in Can-avid town, Eastern Samar.
At least 10 people were killed in the country due to recent floods and heavy rains, the National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council said Thursday.

Five people died in Bicol, 4 in Northern Mindanao and 1 in Davao Region, Office of Civil Defense Joint Information Office head Diego Agustin Mariano told ANC's "Rundown".

Two people remain missing while 4 were reported injured, he added.

In an earlier ANC interview, the Northern Samar Provincial Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office reported 2 fatalities in the towns of Laoang and San Isidro.


Comment: Update January 18
Death toll from Massive flooding in Philippines rises to 30 (18.01.2023)

Floods in the Philippines have claimed the lives of 30 people, the country's National Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Council (NDRRMC) said on Wednesday, adding that five people were missing and 13 others were injured.

According to the agency, 1,576,069 people are affected by the floods, while 200,687 of them are temporarily displaced.

The statement noted that 1,292 houses were damaged, with 383 of them completely destroyed. In addition, the natural disaster damaged 56 #bridges and 242 #roads, and disrupted the work of 26 #seaports.

The power and water supplies were affected in 63 and 17 cities respectively.

(@Manila News)