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Sat, 01 Oct 2022
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Cloud Lightning

3 killed in lightning strike in Chhattisgarh, India

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A 60-year-old woman, her daughter and a man were killed after being struck by lightning in Raigarh district of Chhattisgarh, police said on Saturday.

The incident took place at Kesla village under Lailunga police station limits late Friday evening, a police official said.

The deceased were identified as Khulaso Sarthi (60), her daughter Kamla (30) and Sukhiram Banjara (34), all residents of Lailunga, he said.

"The victims were hit by lightning when they were trying to find shelter from rain," he said, adding that before the incident, they had gone to a nearby temple.

On being informed, police rushed to the village and sent their bodies to the Community Health Centre in Lailunga for autopsy, the official said.

Seismograph

Shallow magnitude 6 earthquake in the North Atlantic Ocean

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Very strong magnitude 6.0 earthquake at 10 km depth

Date & time Oct 1, 2022 01:18:53 UTC
Local time at epicenter Friday, Sep 30, 2022 at 11:18 pm (GMT -2)
Status Confirmed
Magnitude 6
Depth 10.0 km
Epicenter latitude / longitude 53.7113°N / 35.5271°W

Cloud Precipitation

Heavy rains in Barquisimeto, Venezuela causes flooding and power failures

flood
Civil Protection in Barquisimeto, Lara state, reported that the rains recorded during the afternoon of Tuesday, September 27, caused flooded roads, power failures and fallen trees to be recorded in several areas of the region.

The governor of the entity, Adolfo Pereira, offered on Tuesday a first report on the effects of the rains in the region.

The authority pointed out that the rain caused at least six trees to collapse on Rotary Avenue. In total, at least 25 fallen trees are counted in various sectors. He explained that crews from the Iribarren fire department are attending to the situation.


Windsock

Hurricane Ian knocks out power to 2 million on destructive path across Florida - at least 21 dead (UPDATE)

A flooded street in Fort Myers, Florida
© REUTERS
A flooded street in Fort Myers, Florida
Ian was expected to dump 12 to 18 inches of rain on much of central and northeast Florida, with some locations being hit with as much as 2 feet of rain.

Hurricane Ian made landfall on Florida's Gulf Coast on Wednesday, lashing the region with torrential rain and winds of 150 mph and knocking out power to more than 2 million homes and businesses.

The "catastrophic" system, one of the most powerful hurricanes to strike the U.S. in decades, came ashore near Cayo Costa, just west of Fort Myers, around 3 p.m. after strengthening to a powerful Category 4 storm, the National Hurricane Center said.

Hours after landfall, top sustained winds had dropped to 105 mph, making it a Category 2 hurricane. Still, storm surges as high as 6 feet were expected on the opposite side of the state, in northeast Florida.

"Our streets are pretty much underwater," said Mike McNees, the city manager on Marco Island. "The streets, at this point, are indistinguishable from the canals."


Comment: Update September 30

CNN reports:
Hurricane Ian starts lashing South Carolina after leaving at least 21 reported dead and millions without power across Florida

Damaged homes and debris are shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, FL.
© Wilfredo Lee/AP
Damaged homes and debris are shown in the aftermath of Hurricane Ian in Fort Myers, FL.
As much of Florida takes stock Friday of apocalyptic damage - with searchers still checking for people in need and millions without power - deadly Hurricane Ian has begun lashing South Carolina, where an expected afternoon landfall threatens more lethal flooding and enough force to alter the coastal landscape.

With at least 21 deaths reported in Florida, Ian restrengthened to a Category 1 storm in the Atlantic and was barreling toward South Carolina with sustained core winds of 85 mph as of 8 a.m. ET Friday. Its center was due to move onto land between Charleston and Myrtle Beach, forecasters said, with winds up to 73 mph already hitting much of the Carolinas' coast and life-threatening storm surge and hurricane conditions expected within hours.

"This is a dangerous storm that will bring high winds and a lot of water," South Carolina Gov. Henry McMaster tweeted. "Be smart, make good decisions, check on your loved ones, and stay safe."

Meanwhile, Florida confronts the dizzying destruction Ian wrought through much of the peninsula Wednesday and Thursday after it smashed into the southwest coast as a Category 4 storm and plowed through central and northeastern areas. Homes on the coast were washed out to sea, buildings were smashed throughout the state, and floodwater ruined homes and businesses and trapped residents, even inland in places like the Orlando area.

Hundreds of rescues have taken place by land, air and sea, with residents stuck in homes or stranded on rooftops, and searchers have made many wellness checks, especially in the Fort Myers and Naples areas, where feet of storm surge inundated streets and homes.


And now, the storm's aftermath poses new, deadly dangers of its own. Some standing water is electrified, officials warned, while maneuvering through debris-strewn buildings and streets - many without working traffic signals - risks injury. Lack of air conditioning can lead to heat illness, and improper generator use can cause carbon monoxide poisoning.

In North Port between Fort Myers and Sarasota, Rosanna Walker stood Thursday in the flood-damaged home where she rode out the storm. Part of her drywall ceiling was hanging down.

"And all of a sudden, the water was coming in through the doors - the top, the bottom, the windows over here," she told CNN's John Berman. "It's all in my closets; I've got to empty out my closets."

"Everything got ruined."



Arrow Down

Indonesia - 6 killed in South Kalimantan landslide triggered by heavy rain

The location of the community gold mine in the Kukur area, Buluh Kuning Village, Sungai Durian District, Kotabaru Regency, South Kalimantan Province experienced a landslide, Tuesday

The location of the community gold mine in the Kukur area, Buluh Kuning Village, Sungai Durian District, Kotabaru Regency, South Kalimantan Province experienced a landslide, Tuesday.
At least 6 people died after heavy rain triggered a landslide in South Kalimantan Province in Indonesia on 26 September 2022.

Heavy rain falling on unstable ground near the site of a gold mine led to a massive landslide in Buluh Kuning village, Sei Durian District of Kotabaru Regency, South Kalimantan Province, late on 26 September 2022.

Indonesia's disaster management agency BNPB reported 6 people lost their lives in the landslide and emergency teams are searching for a further 5 people thought to be still missing. Six other were injured.

Heavy digging equipment is expected at the site to aid the search operation.


Windsock

Tropical Cyclone Noru leaves 4 dead, thousands displaced in Vietnam and Thailand - 18 inches of rain in 35 hours

Floods in Thailand after Typhoon Noru, 29 Septe
© DDPM Thailand
Floods in Thailand after Typhoon Noru, 29 September 2022.
Disaster authorities in South East Asia report that heavy rain from Tropical Cyclone Noru has caused severe flooding and landslides across parts of Vietnam and Thailand after previously causing widespread damage and flooding in the Philippines.

Vietnam

Before the storm struck in Vietnam as many as 327,937 people had been pre-emptively evacuated across the provinces of Thua Thien Hue, Danang, Quang Nam, Quang Ngai and Bình Định.

Vietnam's Disaster Management Authority (VDMA) reported wind damage in the provinces and cities of Thua Thien Hue, Da Nang, Quang Nam, Quang Ngai, Binh Dinh, Kon Tum and Gia Lai from 28 September. Roofs were ripped from houses and areas were left without electricity.


Comment: Hundreds of thousands evacuated as Typhoon Noru makes landfall in Vietnam's Da Nang


Doberman

Lubbock police investigating death, 3 dogs believed to be involved captured

dog attack
On Wednesday, the Lubbock Police Department posted an update regarding an investigation following a death and dog attack in the city.

"A death investigation is underway by the Metropolitan Special Crimes Unit, following a dog attack in North Lubbock Tuesday morning," reads a portion of the tweet with a link to more information about the investigation.
A death investigation is underway by the Metropolitan Special Crimes Unit, following a dog attack in North Lubbock Tuesday morning. Click here for more information: https://t.co/epcDvo4rJf pic.twitter.com/DVjRUFib4d

— Lubbock Police Dept. (@LubbockPolice) September 28, 2022
The Metropolitan Special Crimes Unit is conducting a death investigation following a Tuesday morning North Lubbock dog attack, the release states.

Snowflake Cold

The Netherlands: Unusually cold in late September

rainy and cold netherlands

Rainy and cold in late September.
A couple of weeks ago, with a temperature of 13.3 degrees Celsius, it was the coldest September 18th since the start of measurements. In addition, September 27th was one of the coldest ever recorded, with the lowest temperature at 9 degrees Celsius. The previous record dates from 1926, when 10.4 degrees Celsius was recorded in the Dutch municipality of De Bilt.

Meteorologist Wouter van Bernebeek told Dutch news site NU.nl:
Around this time of year it's normal when it's 18 to 19 degrees Celsius. This week, some places will not even reach 10 degrees Celsius.

We have had years with 25 degrees Celsius or more, even in October. In the coming days we will go to 15 to 16 degrees Celsius with fairly cold nights and possibly fog. You really can't call that a late summer.

Light Saber

Top climate scientist slams "Goebellian" climate alarm and "ridiculous" attempts to demonize "fertiliser" carbon dioxide

Richard Lindzen
Warming by carbon dioxide is logarithmic due to 'saturation' within the infrared spectrum, and any future doubling of the gas in the atmosphere will be associated with the same warming of around 1°C. This result is not considered controversial, argues atmospheric scientist and Emeritus Professor Richard Lindzen of MIT - although it might be noted that it is, since it fatally undermines the political 'settled' science concept of catastrophic anthropogenic global warming. Professor Lindzen notes that the present "absurd 'scientific' narrative" leaves us with a quasi-religious movement - atop of all this has been the "constant Goebellian repetition by the media of climate alarm".

In a paper published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation (GWPF), Lindzen warns that unless we wake up to the absurdity of the motivating narrative, "this is only likely to be the beginning of the disasters that will follow from the current irrational demonization of CO2". These disasters, of course, include the "hobbling" of Western energy systems, leading to a reduced ability to oppose Russian aggression.

Lindzen has been a long time critic of the political global warming narrative. In his GWPF paper, he notes the 1961 words of the late U.S. President Eisenhower:
The prospect of domination of the nation's scholars by Federal employment, project allocations, and the power of money is ever present and is gravely to be regarded. Yet, in holding scientific research and discovery in respect, as we should, we must also be alert to the equal and opposite danger that public policy could itself become the captive of a scientific-technological elite.

Comment: See also:


Cloud Precipitation

Deadly flash floods in Rijeka, Croatia - 11 inches of rain in 24 hours

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Police in Croatia report one person died in flash floods in the port city of Rijeka after torrential rain on 28 September 2022.

Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service (DHMZ) said 287.5 mm of rain fell in 24 hours in Rijeka. This is thought to be a record, beating the previous daily high of 249 mm set in 2013. Local media said unofficial figures showed the city recorded 140 mm of rain in just 2 hours.

Streets of the city were swamped and traffic brought to a standstill. Homes and public buildings including a school and a police headquarters were damaged. Emergency services received around 200 calls for assistance.