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Cloud Precipitation

Floods and landslides hit Turkey's Black Sea region for second week in a row

flood
A week after Rize was hit by heavy rainfall, floods and landslides, which claimed the lives of six people and caused two people to go missing, the province has been hit by heavy rainfall, floods and landslides again.

Artvin, another Black Sea province on Turkey, has also been faced with floods and landslides as a result of heavy rainfall.

One week has passed in Güneysu

On July 14, Büyükköy town in Rize's Çayeli district, its Güneysu district and Muradiye town in city center were flooded due to rainfall.

As reported by the state-run Anadolu Agency (AA), Ardeşen and Fındıklı were especially affected by the rainfall last evening (July 21).

The mass flow rate of the Arılı Stream in Fındıklı increased due to the heavy rainfall. While the rain has caused some small-scale landslides in Tunca town of Ardeşen, the Dereağızı Community Facilities of Tunca Municipality have been flooded. The mass flow rate of the stream flowing through the açkar village of Areşen district has also increased as a result of the rain.


Comment: A week ago: At least 6 killed due to floods, landslides in Turkey's Black Sea region


Fire

Russia using 'climate engineering' to fight forest fires by seeding clouds with silver iodine to make it rain over blaze

Plane
© Sputnik / Vitaliy Ankov
Emergency workers responding to vast forest fires in a remote region of Russia have revealed they've been using climate engineering technology to trigger rainclouds and help fight the inferno spreading over thousands of hectares.

The regional emergency services headquarters in Yakutia, a Far Eastern region larger in size than countries like Argentina or Mexico, said on Wednesday that they were doing everything possible to tackle the blazes from the air.
"For almost a month, 800 rescuers equipped with parachutes... have been providing assistance in extinguishing the fires," officials said.

Comment: So-called "global warming" as a manmade problem is not, is not supported by the real data from the ground. Other planets in our solar system are also heating up. It is a natural cycle and humans can't influence it much. But they are right about one thing.

The Earth is warming from inside, and the upper atmosphere is rapidly cooling. At the same time, earth rotation is slowing down which means that the Earth's magnetic field is weakening. All these conditions are causing a lot of extreme weather conditions all around the world.

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Cloud Lightning

Lightning strike kills 2 in Cagayan, Philippines

lightning
Police authorities here reported that two people died after being struck by lightning at a rest house within the compound of St. Francis De Assissi Parish Church, Brgy. Mauanan Monday, July 19.

Virginia Acosta, 64, chapel assistant, and Samuel Cruz, 42, and both residents of the said place were rushed to Tuao District Hospital where they were eventually pronounced dead.

The police said the victims, who were securing their carabaos in front of the convent, decided take shelter at the said rest house during a heavy downpour.

However, Rogie Perez, 21, was sitting at the convent at that time when he heard a loud lightning burst.

Perez, who stays inside the convent later on saw the two victims badly injured due to the incident.

Fire

Wildfire smoke now covers much of the United States

The AirNow fire and smoke map shows a film of gray wildfire smoke across most of the US on July 20, 2021.
© AirNow
The AirNow fire and smoke map shows a film of gray wildfire smoke across most of the US on July 20, 2021.
The lower 48 is largely blanketed by hazy, smoke-filled skies as wildfires rage on.

I've been noticing strange sunsets lately in New Mexico where the sun looks like a molten ball of red as it sinks into the west. It's one symptom of wildfire smoke in the sky and a sign of another brutal wildfire season in the US.

The National Weather Service office in Aberdeen, South Dakota, tweeted on Tuesday: "You've probably noticed the persistent hazy skies as of late. Turns out we're not the only ones seeing this -- smoke from wildfires is covering much of the lower 48."

Besides apocalyptic-looking sunsets and orange skies, wildfire smoke can impact air quality far from where a fire is actually located. The wildfires, many of which are burning in the western US, have been fed by severe drought conditions and heat waves. These events have been exacerbated by the climate crisis and the extreme weather it brings with it.

The National Weather Service shared a fire and smoke map from the AirNow air quality monitoring site. What's notable are the wide swaths of gray indicating smoke coverage over the US and Canada, as well as the many marked wildfire locations, denoted by the orange fire icons.


Cloud Precipitation

Heavy rainfall causes severe flooding in Odessa, Ukraine

floods
According to the Hydrometeorological Center, 31 mm of precipitation fell in the city per hour.

A number of city streets were flooded. As noted, the Genoese, French Boulevard and Deribasovskaya, the central alley of Arcadia, turned into flooded rivers.

There is no light in a number of districts of the city. Dozens of trees fell.


Black Cat

Leopard kills 2nd village woman in 3 days in Uttarakhand, India

Stock image of leopard
© Getty
Another woman was killed by a leopard in Durogi village of Tehri district in Uttarakhand on Tuesday in the second such incident in the area in less than a week, officials said.

Gundri Devi (50) was attacked by the leopard while working in a field, forest ranger Devendra Singh Pundir said.

The woman''s body bearing deep wounds on the neck was found a few hours later in a gorge, he said.

This is the second leopard attack casualty in the village in just three days.

The big cat had lifted a woman from her courtyard last Saturday and left her half-eaten body in the fields.

Attention

Man killed in bear attack in Madhya Pradesh, India

bear print
A 55-year-old man was mauled to death by a wild bear in the Panna Tiger Reserve in Madhya Pradesh, a senior official said on Wednesday.

The incident took place on Tuesday evening in the forest near Bagoha village, said the reserve's field director Uttam Kumar Sharma.

The deceased, resident of the same village, had ventured into the forest in search of his buffalo.

While his family suspected that a tiger could have killed him, Sharma said a bear was found to be roaming in the area when the incident took place and inspection of the spot also indicated attack by a bear.

Cloud Lightning

4 hikers injured during lightning strike in Grand Canyon

LIGHTNING
At least four hikers were injured after being struck by lightning while hiking in the Grand Canyon on Tuesday.

Around 2:50 p.m., the Grand Canyon Communications Center received a call that multiple people were struck by lightning at the Bright Angel Trailhead during a monsoonal thunderstorm, according to a press release.

Upon arrival, officials found a 30-year-old male and a 28-year-old female unresponsive. The woman received life-saving measures before regaining a pulse. The male regained consciousness without assistance, officials said.

Both victims were taken to the Flagstaff Medical Center as storm activity prevented air transport, officials said.

Tornado2

Large waterspout spotted in Tampa Bay, Florida

waterspout
As a line of storms swept across Tampa Bay this morning, commuters spotted a large waterspout swirling over the water near the Howard Frankland Bridge.

It was just before 9 a.m. when the waterspout formed. Video from driver Chris Watson showed the funnel just south of Interstate 275 on the Tampa side of the span.

"That thing is huge! Hope I get across this bridge," Watson can be heard chuckling in video shared with FOX 13.

No damage was reported after the funnel was sighted, and no warnings were issued.


Fire

'Climate change is happening': As wildfires destroy hectares of Siberian forest, local politician points finger at global warming

wildfire Russia's Yakutia region
The wildfires in Russia's Yakutia region are caused by climate change, which has led to abnormally hot weather and 'dry thunderstorms.' That's according to Aysen Nikolayev, the head of the vast republic located in eastern Siberia.

Speaking to the local TV Channel Yakutia-24, Nikolayev noted that the region's average temperature in June was 20C - far higher than it should be. His statement comes as many Russian politicians, including President Vladimir Putin, have upped their rhetoric on fighting global warming in recent months.

"Global climate change is happening," the head explained. "This year is the driest and hottest summer that Yakutia has had in the history of meteorological observations since the end of the 19th century. This is the data of the meteorological service, which can't be refuted."

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