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Sun, 27 Nov 2022
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Ladybug

UK: Mass bee invasion closes school

A school has been forced to close after being infested by a swarm of bees.

Almost 300 pupils of Larkman Primary School in Norwich were sent home after thousands of the insects buzzed into the music department.

A spokeswoman for Norfolk County Council said no pupils had been stung and that pest controllers had sprayed a chemical to destroy the bees.

"The bees were found in a wall cavity of the school by pest control officers," the spokeswoman said.

Phoenix

US: Lightning May Have Triggered Fire At St. Patrick's Church in Tampa, Florida

A fire in the social hall attic of St. Patrick's Catholic Church forced the congregation outside just before 9 a.m. Mass on Sunday. A lightning strike on the roof overnight may have ignited a small fire, which smoldered until church member Paul Mumford saw flames about 8:45 a.m.

"I smelled smoke. When I first started looking I couldn't see it. Later I could see flames," Mumford said.

Those attending the Mass were moved outside and an abbreviated service was said as about 50 members stood or sat in folding chairs.

Cloud Lightning

US: Lightning Strike At Hammonassett Beach Kills 1, Injures 4

Connecticut, US - The pavilion must have seemed safe to Mauricio Bugatti when a thunderstorm suddenly raced over Hammonasset beach last weekend. But he stood too close to a wooden pillar, and that's most likely what killed him.

Bugatti, 23, of West Haven, died when lightning struck the pavilion Sunday at West Beach in Hammonasset Beach State Park. Four others who stood near the same pillar - including a 12-year-old - were injured. Those seeking shelter from the storm probably did not realize it, but the pavilion was one of the worst places to be, according to Richard Kithil, founder and chief executive officer of the nonprofit Lightning Safety Institute in Denver. When a lightning bolt hits, it jumps from one object to the next on its way to the ground, and it is drawn to human bodies because of their high saltwater content, experts said.

Cloud Lightning

Tropical storm affects more than 211,000 people in Mexico

At least 211,358 inhabitants in 44 municipalities of the Mexican state of Veracruz were affected by tropical storm "Arthur", Veracruz Civil Protection Ministry said Friday.

Rains will continue on Saturday and Sunday and more people are predicted to be left homeless, the Hydrometeorology Bureau of the Water National Commission said.

The Civil Protection Ministry suggested Friday the Mexican government declare a state of emergency in the 44 municipalities.

Bizarro Earth

'Mud volcano' growing off Trinidad?

The Roiling waters five miles off Trinidad's east coast might be a sign of a mud volcano growing on the ocean floor, belching out methane gas along with a slurry of mud and sediment, experts believe.

©Trinidad Express
A pirogue (small boat), bottom right, moves past what appears to be the activities of a "mud volcano" off Radix Point, Mayaro yesterday.

©Unk

Target

Magnitude 5.8 Earthquake Near Trinidad

Magnitude 5.8 - TRINIDAD REGION, TRINIDAD AND TOBAGO

2008 July 03 06:34:53 UTC

Attention

Plasma, LCDs blamed for accelerating global warming - even on Pluto?

A gas used in the making of flat screen televisions, nitrogen trifluoride (NF3), is being blamed for damaging the atmosphere and accelerating global warming.

Comment: This is a logical fallacy. Yes, warming is a fact - well, until recently. Yes, NF3 is a greenhouse gas. If you dump NF3 into the atmosphere will it warm it? In a closed system, yes. In an open, nonlinear system the answer is, maybe. In a nonlinear system it could just as likely cool it, perhaps by increasing low level cloud cover. Meanwhile, last time we checked, flat screen sales were down on Pluto.


Magnet

Earth's Core, Magnetic Field Changing Fast, Study Says



Image
©Unknown

Rapid changes in the churning movement of Earth's liquid outer core are weakening the magnetic field in some regions of the planet's surface, a new study says.

"What is so surprising is that rapid, almost sudden, changes take place in the Earth's magnetic field," said study co-author Nils Olsen, a geophysicist at the Danish National Space Center in Copenhagen.

The findings suggest similarly quick changes are simultaneously occurring in the liquid metal, 1,900 miles (3,000 kilometers) below the surface, he said.

The swirling flow of molten iron and nickel around Earth's solid center triggers an electrical current, which generates the planet's magnetic field.

The study, published recently in Nature Geoscience, modeled Earth's magnetic field using nine years of highly accurate satellite data.

Cloud Lightning

China: Situation 'critical' as flood season approaches earthquake struck Sichuan

Areas affected by the May 12 earthquake are facing a "critical situation", as the annual flood approaches, a senior official from the Ministry of Water Resources said on Wednesday in Beijing.

Jiao Yong, deputy water minister, said at a press briefing that some parts of China have experienced up to 50 percent more rain this year than usual.

Sichuan is also due to get a lot wetter during its flood season, which is expected to run through this month and next, he said.

The problem is that the earthquake did considerable damage to the province's reservoirs and dams, which will reduce its ability to prevent floods, he said.

People

Despite widespead propaganda, less than half Americans believe man-made global warming

Is the earth warming? Is human activity the cause? Is there anything we can do about it?

While many believe there is a consensus in the scientific community that humans are causing the earth to heat and that serious action must be taken immediately, that's not what most Americans believe, according to a Pew Poll taken May 8.

The poll did find that 71 percent of Americans say there is solid evidence that the earth is warming. But only 47 percent said they believed the earth was warming because of human activities, such as burning fossil fuels.