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Thu, 01 Dec 2022
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Tornado and flooding hits northeast Kuwait

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Weather conditions improved amid heavy rains and violent storms in northern Kuwait with the formation of a tornado, where instability continued to be strong today in northern and northeastern Saudi Arabia, the state of Kuwait and southern Iraq. The intensity of rain and hail continued until Floods hit the Al-Subiya area, northeast of the State of Kuwait, near the Iraq-Basra border after the passing of a giant supercell cloud on November 11, 2022.


Snowflake Cold

Eye popping snowfall totals after November blizzard slams North Dakota, NW Minnesota - 2 feet of snow recorded

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The National Weather Service is reporting some really big snowfall totals for central North Dakota into Northwestern Minnesota.

The first snowstorm of the season produced a Blizzard Warning for much of that area on Wednesday and Thursday.

The National Weather Service says Bismarck has had 24 inches of snow, Steel 22", Mandan 21", and Devils Lake 12.5". Grand Forks is at 9.1" and Roseau at 7.5".

A Winter Weather Advisory remains in place for the northern third of Minnesota until 9:00 a.m. Friday. Additional snow accumulations should be less than an inch. However, 40 mile an hour winds will blow the snow around that has already fallen.


Windsock

41% of climate scientists don't believe in catastrophic climate change, major new poll finds

sunrise
For years, the promoters of the spurious 'settled science' narrative have claimed that there is a 97-99% consensus among scientists about humans causing climate change. The claim is meaningless since it fails to address differences in the extent of human involvement and how harmful the warming is thought to be. A recently published survey of top-level climate scientists found that just over five in 10 attributed the human contribution to recent climate change to be 75% or above. Only around four in 10 scientists believed that the frequency and severity of extreme weather events had increased significantly in recent years.
graph climate humans

Comment: 41% of climate scientists aren't members of the climate cult and still have the capacity of independent thought. Who knew?


Seismograph

Major magnitude 7.0 earthquake - South Pacific Ocean, Fiji - 5th for the region in 3 days

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Major magnitude 7.0 earthquake at 587 km depth

Earthquake details

Date & time Nov 12, 2022 07:09:14 UTC
Local time at epicenter Saturday, Nov 12, 2022 at 8:09 pm (GMT +13)
Status Confirmed
Magnitude 7
Depth 587.2 km
Epicenter latitude / longitude 20.1155°S / 178.3627°W (South Pacific Ocean, Fiji)

Comment: The others:


Cow

'Large grazing mammals offset climate effects'

yak grazing
© Shauryankar Lingwal (CC BY-SA 4.0)
Large grazing animals can play a role in stabilising soil carbon and mitigating climate change effects.
A study conducted over a 16-year period in India's Himalayan region confirms what scientists have always believed — that large, grazing mammals play a vital role in stabilising soil carbon and mitigating the effects of climate change.

Soil organic carbon created by decomposing matter supports all life on Earth and provides the largest carbon sink after the oceans. Climate change and sustainable development can be affected by even the slightest change in the quantity and quality of soil carbon, says a paper by the UN Convention to Combat Desertification.

Researchers from the Indian Institute of Science, Bangalore, fenced-off grazing herbivores, such as yaks and ibex, in selected areas of Spiti in Himachal Pradesh state and found that it resulted in the increased stability of soil carbon in the grazed area while there were increased fluctuations in the excluded areas.

Comment: Keep this in mind when confronted with the tired 'cow-farts destroy the planet' trope. The popular climate change narrative is a complete fabrication from the ground up.

See also:


Seismograph

Pacific tsunami warning withdrawn after 7.3 magnitude earthquake east of Tonga - 4th major quake for the region in 2 days

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U.S. authorities have withdrawn the tsunami warning it had declared Friday for multiple Pacific Ocean territories for a 7.3 magnitude earthquake 211 kilometers northeast of Tonga, in the middle of the Pacific Ocean.

The earthquake was recorded at 11:48 a.m. (Spanish peninsular time) with a hypocenter at a depth of about 25 kilometers, according to the report of the Earthquake Emergency Program of the United States Geological Survey (USGS), for its acronym in English.

Comment: Two days earlier: 3 major earthquakes hit South Pacific in quick succession - magnitudes 6.8, 7.0 and 6.6


Snowflake

Alta Ski Area, Utah has already eclipsed 100 inches of snow (they're not open yet)

alta
There are many ski areas across the mid-Atlantic and Northeast that would be absolutely thrilled to hit 100 inches of snow throughout an entire season.

Then there's Alta Ski Area, UT, who hit the mark 8 days before they even open. Yeah, you read that correctly...

Alta has seen 100 inches of snow already this Fall, and they don't plan on welcoming skiers until Friday, November 18th. Crazy, right?

Alta has seen a flurry of winter storms dump double-digit storm totals over the last three weeks, with 32 inches falling over the last 48 hours.


Windsock

Hurricane Nicole makes landfall along Florida's East Coast - 5 killed, 300,000 without power (UPDATE)

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HURRICANE Nicole officially made landfall on the Florida coast early Thursday morning.

Nicole, a Category 1 Hurricane, hit the east coast of the Florida on North Hutchinson Island just south of Vero Beach around 3 am EST, according to the National Hurricane Centre.

The storm has brought intense rain and winds of up to 75 miles per hour, causing nearly 500 flight cancelations in Orlando and leaving tens of thousands without power.

Just before 4 am local time, more than 64,000 Floridians were without power, according to data obtained by Poweroutage.us.

Hurricane Nicole was highly anticipated, with Florida Gov. Ron DeSantis declaring a state of emergency in 34 counties on Monday.


Comment: Update November 11

FOX Weather reports:
5 deaths in Florida attributed to Tropical Storm Nicole, officials say

Tropical Storm Nicole has now been blamed for at least five deaths in Florida.

Officials at the Orange County Sheriff's Office said two people were electrocuted by a downed power line early Thursday in Orlando.

The power line fell as Nicole barreled across the Florida Peninsula after making landfall about 3 a.m. Thursday just south of Vero Beach, Florida as a Category 1 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson Hurricane Wind Scale.


More than 300,000 power outages have been reported across the Sunshine State as of early Thursday afternoon.

Two other people died in a crash on Florida's Turnpike in the county Thursday morning, according to Orange County Mayor Jerry Demings at a news conference Thursday.

Beach erosion caused by Tropical Storm Nicole
© New Smyrna Beach
Beach erosion caused by Tropical Storm Nicole at Chases on the Beach in New Smyrna Beach, Florida on Nov. 10, 2022.
A central Florida man died during Hurricane Nicole early Thursday morning, according to the Cocoa Police Department. Thomas Whittle, 68, of Port Canaveral was unresponsive when police found him and his wife on their yacht that was docked at Lee Wenner Park in the town of Cocoa.

First responders tried to perform CPR on Whittle, while waves battered the yacht and caused it to float away from the dock. Responders were able to rope the boat in and then bring Whittle to the hospital, where he later died. Cocoa police state the cause of death is still under investigation.

Relentless waves caused by Nicole have pounded Florida beaches. The erosion led to the evacuation of several condominiums and houses, which were deemed to be structurally unsound. Parts of homes and other buildings have also washed into the sea as the ground they were built on is eaten away by the high surf.



While Nicole has now weakened into a tropical storm, impacts such as coastal flooding, beach erosion, heavy rain, gusty winds and tornadoes will continue to spread across Florida, the Southeast and up the Eastern Seaboard through Friday.

A Tornado Watch was in effect Thursday for areas of northeast Florida, coastal Georgia and southeast South Carolina.



Boat

Bahamas - Hurricane Nicole triggers coastal flooding

Hurricane Nicole caused coastal flooding in the Bahamas, 09 November 2022.
© NEMA
Hurricane Nicole caused coastal flooding in the Bahamas, 09 November 2022.
Tropical Storm Nicole made landfall in the Abaco Islands of the Bahamas on 09 November 2022, strengthening into a hurricane.

On 10 November, Hurricane Nicole made landfall along the east coast of Florida just south of Vero Beach. The storm weakened as it moved over central east Florida.

Twenty-seven shelters were made available in Abaco, Grand Bahama, Bimini and the Berry Islands of the Bahamas in advance of the storm. Residents uncertain of the reliability of their living structure were urged to go immediately to the nearest one. As of 09 November, the Red Cross reported around 170 people had moved to the shelters, mostly in Abaco.

Storm surge was expected to raise water levels around 4 feet (1.2 metres) to 6 feet (1.8 metres) above normal tide, and large swells were forecasted to affect the northern Bahamas.


Cloud Precipitation

Massive flooding in Sangre Grande,Trinidad

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RISING water levels interrupted the slumber of hundreds of people in Sangre Grande early Wednesday morning, after a tropical wave brought intense rainfall for almost ten hours.

An alarm was raised around 5am as residents in low-lying areas along Picton Road, Railway Road, Ramdass Street, Adventist Street, Good Hope Street, Coalmine and Fishing Pond woke up to flooded streets and homes.

Some residents had to race for higher ground while trying to save whatever appliances and valuables they could.

Residents of Picton Road were heard appealing to Toco/Sangre Grande MP Roger Monroe to block the road, as vehicles driving through the flood were causing more damage by pushing the water further into their homes.