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Thu, 03 Dec 2020
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Melting Of Greenland's Ice Sheet 'Is The Turning Point'

The world's target for stopping global warming should be based on the point at which the melting of the great Greenland ice sheet becomes irreversible, says the Government's chief scientific adviser, Sir David King.

The loss of Greenland's ice would be a global catastrophe, raising sea levels by more than 20ft, swamping vast regions of low-lying land from East Anglia to Bangladesh.

The international community must limit the atmospheric level of the principal greenhouse gas, carbon dioxide (C02), to below the point where the Greenland ice begins to melt in a runaway manner, Sir David said. This figure is not yet precisely known - but much scientific effort is being expended on finding it out.

Comment: It's the "tipping point" alright, but for entirely different reasons than the global warmists are telling you:

Fire and Ice: The Day After Tomorrow


Better Earth

No climate action may spark economic crisis: report

LONDON - Ignoring climate change could lead to economic upheaval on the scale of the 1930s Depression, underlining the need for urgent action to combat global warming, a British report on the costs of climate change said.

The report by chief British government economist Nicholas Stern, a 27-page summary of which was obtained by Reuters, says the benefits of determined worldwide steps to tackle climate change would greatly outweigh the costs.

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Troubling species extinctions studied

U.S. scientists say species are becoming extinct thousands of times faster than they have historically, and that is posing problems for humanity.

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Earthquake Swarms Not Just Clustered Around Volcanoes, Geothermal Regions

An earthquake swarm - a steady drumbeat of moderate, related seismic events - over hours or days, often can be observed near a volcano such as Mount St. Helens in Washington state or in a geothermal region such as Yellowstone National Park in Wyoming. New research led by a University of Washington seismologist shows, however, that such swarms can occur anywhere that is seismically active, not just near volcanoes or geothermal regions.

"In our research we saw swarms everywhere and we could see the broad characteristics of how they behaved," said John Vidale, a UW professor of Earth and space sciences and director of the Pacific Northwest Seismograph Network.

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Australian drought to hurt economic growth, reap worst wheat crop in 12 years

Australia's worst drought in recorded history will cut its wheat crop to its lowest level in 12 years and cut economic growth by around 0.7 percent, an official forecast said Friday.

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New research shows the growing threat posed by drought

Research from Met Office (UK) scientists shows that an additional quarter of the earth's land surface could be affected by drought by the end of this century.

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Hunger on the increase

NEW YORK -- A UN rights advocate said that millions more of the world's poor suffered malnutrition last year.

The advocated also charged that the trade practices of wealthy nations and desert encroachment aggravated the problem.

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Canoeist goes missing as hundreds flee homes in worst floods for 70 years

A MAN was missing last night after an open canoe capsized on a loch.

The horror unfolded as the worst storms in 70 years lashed northern Scotland. Hundreds fled their homes as flooding caused mayhem.

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Mystery 'explosion' damages homes

Reports of a loud explosion on the north Cornwall and Devon border are being investigated.

A number of residents reported hearing a loud bang between 1130 and 1200 BST around the Bude and Holsworthy area. Others said their homes were damaged.

Comment: Comment: There are a couple of reports of similar incidents in different locations here, and if interested in this topic there is the Signs Supplement: Sonic or "Mystery" Booms.


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Global warming could put New York City at hurricane, flood risk

NASA researchers are investigating the potential impact of climate change on New York City using computer models to simulate future climates and sea level rise. Their studies, to date, forecast a 15 to 19 inch-increase in sea levels by the 2050s that could put the city at higher risk of flooding during storm surges.