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Sun, 19 Jan 2020
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Lewiston residents unnerved by dead crows

LEWISTON - Residents unnerved by the unexplained deaths of dozens of crows in a neighborhood next to the Promenade Mall hope tests by the U.S. Department of Agriculture will provide some answers.

To residents, it seems almost as though dead crows were falling from the sky. Damien Perreault, 71, said he disposed of 10 dead crows he found on a walk Monday. That didn't count crows dead in the trees.

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Hundreds of seagulls killed mysteriously

Chinanews, Jinan, Dec. 19 - Hundreds of seagulls were found dead on the beach of Zhouge Village, eastern China's Shandong Province.

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Floods displace thousands in Malaysia

Six people have died and 60,000 homes have been evacuated in southern Malaysia in the worst flooding in living memory.

But unofficial reports suggest the number of dead may be much higher, the CBC's Jonathan Kent reported Friday.

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A shock To The Ancient Rhythms Of The Natural World

Animals that hibernate in winter abandoning hibernation: yet another signal that something momentous is happening to the rhythms of the natural world, in the way in which we have always understood them.

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NASA Provides New Perspectives On The Earth's Changing Ice Sheets

It's widely documented that climate change is causing the Greenland and Antarctic ice sheets to shrink. Air temperatures in many parts of the polar regions have increased and waters that surround parts of the ice sheets have warmed up. What most do not know is that until just six years ago, we had no real way of measuring whether the ice sheets were shrinking or growing, or at what rate.

Today, advances in remote sensing, the use of highly sensitive instruments aboard satellites and aircraft, have enabled scientists to examine the mass balance of the ice sheets and to determine just where and how quickly the ice is growing or shrinking. Of particular importance is the mass balance of the ice sheet, which is the difference between how much ice it has lost versus gained over a period of time, and is a direct measure of an ice sheet's contribution to sea level rise.

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Colorado reels under blizzard

A storm Wednesday dumped more than half a metre of snow on Colorado, bringing much of the state to a halt.

Schools, malls and offices were closed Thursday, the governor declared a state of emergency and 4,700 travellers spent the night at Denver International Airport after flights were cancelled.

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Geologists warn of tsunamis in Israel

When the massive tsunami hit the Indian Ocean two years ago and killed nearly a quarter of a million people, Israelis said that was one problem that wouldn't hit them.

But research conducted by Dr. Amos Salamon of the Geological Survey of Israel and colleagues in Italy and the US will report on Thursday that since before the Common Era, there have been two dozen tsunamis documented in the region and 11 on Israel's (illegal) coasts.

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Spate of quakes prompts El Salvador evacuation

Authorities in El Salvador said today they had evacuated 90 people near the Guatemalan border after 193 small earthquakes caused minor damage to homes and widespread panic.

The earthquakes ranged between magnitude 2.3 and 4.3, according to the National Service of Territorial Studies. At least 90 of the tremors were felt by the population.

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Shiveluch volcano on Kamchatka spews ash to 10 km height

A series of ash spews has been registered from the crater of the Shiveluch volcano on Russia's Kamchatka Peninsula.

One of the spews reached an altitude of 10 kilometres above the summit, the Kamchatka branch of the Geophysical Service of the Russian Academy of Sciences (RAN) told Itar-Tass on Tuesday.

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Climate change melting Kilimanjaro's snows

NARO MORU, Kenya -- Rivers of ice at the Equator -- foretold in the 2nd century, found in the 19th -- are now melting away in this new century, returning to the realm of lore and fading photographs.

From mile-high Naro Moru, villagers have watched year by year as the great glaciers of Mount Kenya, glinting in the equatorial sun high above them, have retreated into shrunken white stains on the rocky shoulders of the 16,897-foot peak.

Climbing up, "you can hear the water running down beneath Diamond and Darwin," mountain guide Paul Nditiru said, speaking of two of 10 surviving glaciers.